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There are so many trends online it might be difficult to keep up. But if you’ve spent at least some time on social media lately, you might have seen a woman or two making something from scratch in the kitchen dressed as someone straight from the 1950s.

If you were wondering if time travel has suddenly become a thing, you’re mistaken. It’s not that. It’s the so-called ‘tradwives’ taking the internet by storm, shedding light on a lifestyle based on traditional gender roles, and, well… cooking stuff from scratch.

With the woman in the family being dependent on the man—the sole breadwinner in the household—it resembles (to some extent, at least) women’s lives back in the '50s, but the two are not entirely the same. If you’re wondering what some of the differences are or what actual traditional housewives from the 1950s would like to say to their 21st-century counterparts, scroll down to find their messages, as shared on Reddit, and see for yourself what they want the younger generation to know about such a lifestyle.

If you scroll down, you will also find Bored Panda’s interviews with the incoming assistant professor at Purchase College in New York, author of ‘What ‘Real’ Women Want: Alt-Right Femininity Vlogs as an Anti-Feminist Populist Aesthetic’, Dr. Megan L. Zahay, and the award-winning journalist and author, creator of the podcast ‘Under the Influence’, Jo Piazza, who were kind enough to share their thoughts on the tradwife lifestyle and the influencers who endorse it.

#1

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences My grandmother raised 5 kids on the prairies in the 40s. She worked from before dawn until midnight.

She almost died from one homebirth and had to get up with a broken pelvis 2 days later to help with the farm.

She wasn't allowed to wear pants or cut her hair and slaved her entire life. She had little or no agency in anything. Don't be like that.

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Lauren Caswell
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

This needs to be a caveat to cut through the rosy tint so many naive young people are viewing the past with.

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#2

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences I’m not a woman, so this will rightly languish down the bottom of the page, but the tradwife resurgence amongst young women, especially as it’s emerging from the right, is not yet old enough to have experienced that the next step after trad-wife is trad-betrayed-wife-in-an-anti-divorce-culture

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#3

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences Not me. I got married in the 90s. But all the women in my grandmother’s and mother’s generations fit that bill, and they were miserable and trapped and dehumanized and left with no options and it made them mean. They didn’t choose that lifestyle, and they barely chose their husbands. They were forced into it by a lack of other viable options and the pressure of their families. Most were just grateful to have found someone to support them, without much regard for whether they liked them or not.

It’s the choice that matters. As long as you choose that lifestyle and choose your partner and it makes you happy? Terrific. But there are still people alive who would gladly force women back into having no choice and no options because that was easier for men. Be careful that you are not on a slippery slope back to that hell scape because I’m here to tell you, I didn’t know one happy woman in those generations.

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Poison Ivy/Boo
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Reminds me of my grandma on my dad's side and my mother. Neither of them were happy. It broke my heart to watch how the men treated them. Common denominator....my dad's side. They were horrible to women!

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According to the award-winning journalist, author of The Sicilian Inheritance and other bestsellers, and creator of the Under the Influence podcast, Jo Piazza, the whole point of the original tradwife movement was that they don’t work, don’t make their own money, and don’t have ambitions outside the home and are submissive to their husbands.

“It was originally a niche on social media that grew because it caused dissent—and social media loves dissent—and because much of the content was visually attractive and aspirational in its simplicity,” Jo told Bored Panda. “It has since grown to encompass a number of women who are cosplaying at domesticity to gain traction on social media.”

#4

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences My mom was a tradwife.

Based on conversations with her over the years, she'd probably tell those young women: "There's nothing wrong with learning and mastering the domestic arts. You should always be proud of yourself for learning new skills and keeping a nice home.

But 'don't put all your eggs in one basket' also applies here. In this modern age, things change so quickly. Relationships, geographic location, even family. You need to be comfortable having the skills to take care of yourself too -- not just your house and your husband.

It's much better to view homemaking as a hobby rather than your raison d'être.

We did lived that way because we had to. But people also used to drink wine because the water wasn't safe to consume. Just because it's traditional, doesn't make it good."

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#5

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences My friend is a tiny bit older than I am but was mother, home-maker, hostess for business dinners-seriously! Gave up her STEM job for the whole mom/wife thing. Husband traded her in for a younger model after 27 years. I would never suggest anyone do this without a viable income.

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Howl's sleeping castle
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

My mum wasnt a typical trad wife. She used to work but it wasn't enough to run a family of 5. She always told us to keep working no matter how rich our husbands would be so that for little things you don't have to ask someone else for money.

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“The actual percentage of women in the fifties who were living the way these tradwives claim to live now is incredibly low. And those women had no choice or agency in the matter,” Jo continued. “They couldn't apply for credit cards on their own or get a well-paying job that would support them to live well without a husband.”

#6

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences My grandma didn't really want to get married, and had desperately wanted to become a doctor.

She was married after the partition(India Pakistan)in 1948, it was arranged. Before then she had been quite politically active, having been arrested among others protesting the British occupation.

She ended up going for her masters in the 60s, when her kids were older, but I think she always felt unfulfilled. The great irony is her younger sister(grandma was 20 years older) ended up going to med school and becoming a doctor.

My grandmother was adamant about all of us finishing our education and got mad at my mom when she heard i was taking sewing classes at the community center one summer. She didn't want me stuck doing that type of work.

My grandma taught me how important it was to have your own money, she used to hide and give me cash to get her things, or give me more birthday money or Eid money than my grandpa. She would ask how much he gave and then secretly hand me double.

She taught me that having a career and education is very important for women. I think if she'd had the option she wouldn't have gotten married and probably been child free.

Her MiL and maiden SiL lived with them and caused problems and fights their whole marriage. She never learned to drive bc grandpa wanted SiL to learn also, and my great aunt some how would interfere with every attempt at her being independent. Often being so cruel to my grandmother. And her and grandpa fought most of their lives, even in old age.

She was a very strong woman who taught me strength and to go after my dreams since she didn't get the opportunity to do so.

Sorry for the rant, but she definitely did not want us to become housewives, and tried her best to have her own secret money always.

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robin aldrich
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Bless that woman who remained strong and tried to help Generations who came after her

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#7

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences My mother was the typical trapped Christian Trad wife. She had three daughters and told us constantly that we needed to be self-sufficient and never rely on a man. When she was first married as a woman, she could not get her own bank account or credit card without my father's permission. She had no identity other than Mrs. "Dad's first name/Last name". My father kept an iron grip on her and she was very depressed. I made sure that I could always fully support myself. I would never put myself in that position because I grew up seeing the abuse perpetuated on so many women by their husbands. Never, ever, ever give away your power and identity to another. I believe in equal partnership in a relationship.

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keyboardtek
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I would think having a trad marriage is tremendously stressful on the husband too. He has to work his butt off to have an income to support a non working wife and family. He insists on making all the important decisions about the wife and family which would be an added level of stress no man needs. Probably why men in those relationships often died in their 50's & 60's. Who needs that extra responsibility?

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#8

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences Personally I was too young, but lots of women in our family's social circle were Ye Olde Wyfe. Overall, they seemed content enough, but once you really listened to them talking amongst themselves, you could hear faint tendrils of Unhappy.


This one dropped out of Juilliard (although her husband finished his education, naturally), that one left her job at the courthouse as a judge's assistant (although of her husband hadn't left his job, naturally), that one wanted to travel and of course could not (although her husband made frequent business trips, naturally), this one loved sports but certainly couldn't indulge, as a wife and mother, in playing games, (although her husband never missed his days at the golf course, naturally) etc. All of them - every last one of them - had given up Some Thing they had loved or wanted in order to marry and have children, as society dictated they were supposed to do.


The men had not sacrificed anything that I ever heard them mourning over. The men could happily go off to deer camp for a week, the women might go to a 2 hour long Tupperware party presentation.


The wives took refuge in the spotless house and soap operas, mostly. There was a s***ide, a m*rder of a philandering husband, a few had to take pills "for their nerves", some of them were completely flummoxed when their husband died and they were faced with mysteries like writing a check or driving a car.


I always felt faintly sorry for these women. Now I look back and am horrified at all the lost potential, the wasted earning power, the abandoned ambitions, the thwarted dreams, the abnegation of Self that these women embraced because that's just How Things Are, my dear.


"Trad wife" of today does not seem anywhere close to all of that. They can bake their own bread and dress like Beaver Cleaver's mom, but no, it's not quite the same now as it was then.

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Kari Panda
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

"The men had not sacrificed anything" That is the important part here I think. Yes, you make sacrifices - in a relationship but much much more with children. What matters is that a) it’s your choice and not forced (I happily sacrifice a lot for my daughter and don’t mourn it at all) and b) that both partners/parents make sacrifices.

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According to the host of ‘Under the Influence’, the world is a disaster right now in every possible way, which is why there seems to be a trend based on a false nostalgia – a nostalgia for a faux version of America in the 1950s that never existed outside of sitcoms because people often find it comforting. “If we cling to this false nostalgia where women did not have agency or autonomy, we could roll back the laws that gave women that independence without even realizing what we're doing.

“My biggest fear is broadcasting these images to a generation of young women who I hope will find meaning outside of serving a partner and painting their faces to resemble a sitcom character,” Jo shared. “The majority of these women on social media are performing the idea of being a tradwife to make money. It’s all a scam.”

#9

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences An English woman I know told me a great story that I think fits here:
She came to America in the 50’s after marrying a G.I. By the 1960’s she had two children. Right after she gave birth to her second child, she developed a really terrible pelvic infection. Like fever, sharp pains, hurt to pee, the whole nine yards.
Her husband was deployed so a neighbor friend drove her and all their children to the hospital. The friend waited in the car with the kids and she walked in alone. She explained at the reception area that she had just given birth and was in terrible pain.

They refused to treat her because she was wearing pants.

They said if she came back in a skirt she could be seen. She frantically made her way back to the car and told her friend what happened. Friend immediately takes off her own skirt in the car and they try to trade bottoms so the English woman could go back in. She couldn’t get the skirt zipped up because she had just had a baby. So they left.
The friend took her to own gynecologist who, after examining her, said that her pelvis was so infected he thought he was going to have to give her a full hysterectomy. She did end up having surgery but he was able to leave all her bits intact. Took her ages to recover and I nearly fell out of my chair listening to this story. We will never know, truly, how bad it was for so many women then. Stories like these don’t often get told and it’s a shame because these women were hard! The s**t they put up with is unreal.

Oh and all this took place in California which surprised me to no end because I thought they’d have been one of the most progressive states for women.

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#10

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences My father was visiting family after his mother passed away in her late 80s. As he tells it, the scene was himself, my stepmother, a number of my grandmother’s sisters, and assorted friends of my grandmother and great-aunts, mostly women.

My father was talking to a woman whose husband had recently died. She, like pretty much every woman there, had been married her entire life and had lived as a “tradwife”. At one point, she looked at my father and said, “I had forgotten that men could be kind.”

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#11

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences It's terribly risky. You are staking the survival of your self and your children on a man. So many women have been dumped for a trophy girlfriend after twenty years of loyal service to a husband, and left penniless, with no job skills.

Even if your husband doesn't leave you, he may still become disabled and unable to work, or he may die.

If you're gonna be to do this, make sure you have a huge multi million life insurance policy on your husband. Make sure you are funding a retirement plan for yourself out of the family income. In your name only, not your husband's name. Make sure you keep up some sort of resume with a part time job.

Don't let your husband take the attitude that he controls the money because he's the one who earns the paycheck. Remember that the services you provide for free would cost him a lot of money if he has to pay fair market wages for the work you do.

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Beak Hookage
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

When I was a kid we were taught a song whose lyrics were, in part: "Supermum, you're wonderful, but very underpaid. Supermum, you're cook and cleaner, handyman and maid! If you put in a bill for all the work you do, there'd be an awful lot of wages due!"

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Unfortunately, according to Piazza, most people don’t realize that it’s all a scam. “Most young women don’t realize that it is all for show. Most young women will see these beautiful and idealized accounts and think that these women are truly submissive to their husbands or boyfriends, that they have given up their agency and ambition and their power.

“Many young women will internalize that message because there is no disclaimer on Instagram or TikTok saying, ‘This is just a performance for the algorithm so I can make money and get famous’. And that is why this #tradwife life is so dangerous.”

#12

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences My mother was one. Watching her life is why, at the age of 8, I swore never to have kids. And now, safely post menopausal I can confirm I never did. You will lose yourself completely, everything you think of as you. Will be consumed by the lifestyle. Your bodily autonomy is taken not only by your husband and pregnancy, but taken by your children, your privacy, your time, your thoughts, and your ability to make a decision for yourself. Every decision you make will have to put someone else first because hubby isn't picking up the slack.

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General Anaesthesia
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1 week ago (edited) DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

There is no slack for a husband to pick up if you're a 'tradwife'. He man you trad, you property.

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#14

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences Being a "tradwife" is an idealized version of what the reality was and they are "playing" house. My mother couldn't open a bank account or have credit card or get a prescription for birth control without his permission. For many, many years, she signed her name, Mrs (his name). Her identity WAS his identity. Being a feminist, this all angered her. Yes, you can be feminist and still love men and participate in traditional activities. She enjoyed cooking and baking, took great care of the house, was President of the women's club, etc but as soon as she could, legally, she made sure she had what she needed to take care of herself if she ever needed to. Including birth control, signing HER name, getting her own bank account with money she made, and buying with her own credit.

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Susie Elle
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

It's not the cooking and baking and child rearing and homemaking that's the potential issue, it's making yourself completely dependent on another person. If this is a temporary situation, then sure, that happens, but if it's how you set up your life long-term, you're taking a huge risk.

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According to the incoming assistant professor at Purchase College, Dr. Megan L. Zahay, the phenomenon of tradwives is a confluence of ‘girlie’ social media aesthetics and the alt-right. “In fact, some tradwife influencers have both real-life and online connections to known alt-right figures,” she pointed out. “One problematic aspect of the phenomenon is that tradwife content is rarely identified as such by its creators. Social media users looking for content about, for example, baking, femininity, or relationship advice may inadvertently begin consuming tradwife content which covers these topics but also has certain political goals.

“So while users may indeed enjoy an aesthetic baking video, they may also be exposed to messaging that defines ‘real’ womanhood according to an imagined and romanticized version of the mid-20th century housewife. This is problematic because tradwife influencers’ politics and connections to alt-right figures often go on behind the scenes rather than in the content that viewers see, despite the two being intimately connected.”

#15

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences My mom was born in the 20s. She had more kids (6) than planned and had a lot of housewife pressures. The hard part for her was that her narcissistic husband (my Dad, whom I adored) cut her out of all major decisions. He was successful (Ivy League prof), but very self absorbed, beyond the social norms of the day and more due to his narcissism. She would purposefully set up boundaries to avoid full martyrdom, which I always thought was healthy. She would sleep in until we left the house to go to school, and she’d give herself a nap every afternoon after lunch.

Safe to say she felt very constrained by this role and would have had an interesting career if she been born much later. She was widowed at age 68 and lived another 29 years. In her old age she was very socially involved and LOVED making her own decisions. Sharp to the end, as she outlived her friends, she immersed herself in progressive politics, college and NBA basketball and comedy shows like The Office and 30 Rock. She was lonely as her friends passed, but also loved her solitude.

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Susie Elle
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Your mom sounds like a powerhouse though in spite of all her hardships!

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#16

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences I was the wife of a minister. But I chose to stay home and raise the kids. I also worked at the church and just took my kids with me everywhere I went. This was my decision and was extremely important to me. I am now a grandmother and I am supporting whatever my kids decide to do. I do believe that being home is important to the growth of a child and the relationship but I made my own decisions with my children and I believe that every other parent has the right to do what they feel is best for their family.

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Lil Miss Hobbit
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

My mom would say the same. It worked very well for her and Dad, but they would never push it on their children.

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#17

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences I mean, even for “old people“, on Reddit, you’re still talking about our grandmothers, or at best, mothers.

But from what I witnessed of it, it’s thankless and miserable. Financially trapped and controlled. And that’s the GOOD ones.

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Bartlet for World Domination
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1 week ago (edited) DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

My grandmother was born around 1915, finished university before the war, had six children who all have higher education, and worked in her profession until retirement. Obviously all 12 grandchildren are feminists.

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Dr. Zahay added that it’s important to remember that much of what we see on social media is idealized, regardless of the creator’s political beliefs. “However, this becomes an issue when users are unknowingly exposed to persuasive political messaging. Hiding such ideas behind popular social media aesthetics can be dangerous, particularly to younger viewers who may be using these platforms to explore their identity and relationships.”

#18

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences Not me, but my mother who is now in her mid-late 60's. My mother is a tradwife (she had her first child in the mid 80's). Her marriage with my Dad is not a particularly happy one and she drinks quite a bit now all the kids are out of home. She is happiest when he travels for work or she is looking after her grandchildren. I've noticed she can fixate on relationship issues between her and my siblings because she never had much of an education or career (she left school at 15 to become receptionist/secretary) or any sort of life outside of the home.

She only had one friend outside of the women she met through her kids at playgroup, school etc. Menopause was hard as she went through it cold turkey and was married to a man who made it all about how he suffered through her mood swings and completely untreated mental health struggles. She was a wonderful mother - she devoted herself completely to her kids. But I've watched her struggle since we all moved out. I try to take her out, buy her nice gifts and call her regularly (I live in another state). I worry about what will happen when my Dad retires. She has no financial independence at all. I suspect one's experience of the 'tradwife' life is entirely dependent on the man you marry.

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robin aldrich
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Just breaks my heart and I'm so happy at least one of the children looks after her and it's typical of many men who would take something a woman's going through as an inconvenience to him

#19

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences It is ripe for abuse. It didn't end well for me and now I am disabled. PTSD & a more severe case of EDS than I should've had. Got diagnosed during the divorce process thankfully.

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Lil Miss Hobbit
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I think THIS is the proper mindset. For some families, it works within healthy boundaries (she CHOOSES to stay home, etc.) but the whole thing is 'ripe for abuse' as OP said.

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#20

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences My mom was a trad wife and stay-at-home mom. She was extremely miserable. She barely graduated high school and then worked low-paying jobs and lived at home for a few years until she met my dad and got married at age 20. She moved directly from her parents' house to my dad's house. She never went to college. Never traveled. My dad was a Vietnam vet with PTSD who drank a lot. Did not go to college. Worked low-paying, blue-collar jobs.

I ended up being a stay-at-home mom for awhile but had a couple of college degrees and +10 years of work experience. I also traveled a bit by myself and with friends to see the world. I loved staying home and leaned into the DIY homemaker role. I love to garden, cook, bake, being a mom, etc. I home-schooled my child for awhile. I re-joined the workforce when my kid started public middle school.

For women considering doing a "trad wifeish" stint:

* Have a backup plan in case your husband drops dead or leaves.
* Have some job skills. Try to maintain them. Take a class or workshop now and then.
* Make sure your name is on EVERYTHING that is shared with your husband: The bank accounts, the house, the car, the bills, etc.
* Husband should do some tasks, mine has always been in charge of meals on weekends.
* Communicate clearly with your partner about your emotional needs. If you are feeling unappreciated, talk it out before it spirals into a bigger problem.

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Goe
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Great advice! Being a SAHM is a great lifestyle if 1) you choose it, and 2) you have a backup plan. At any moment your spouse can spontaneously die, cheat, leave, etc., and it's important to be prepared. In this economy it's very tough to be left destitute, and you may not recover financially if a spouse decides to leave you

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“So many of us are hungry for an identity these days; and many of us find that identity through our digital brands and through the likes and affirmations we get online,” Jo Piazza pointed out in an interview with Bored Panda. “The women in the #tradwife community just seem desperate to be a part of something, to be recognized for their efforts in the home and the domestic space. In a lot of ways this is a costume they are putting on. This is a performance. This is a way of saying ‘Hey, pay attention to me, I am doing something that has meaning’.”

#21

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences My mom kept house and churned out five kids between 19 and 26. Five kids under 7. 


I think she loved being a mom and was ok with keeping a large house. My grandmother lived with us, so there were two people to keep up with chores. My parents got divorced though as soon as we were all grown. My mom went back to school at that point and got a doctorate. 


I think she liked having the best of all worlds when she had them, but her advice to my sister and I was to have our own money. 

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Lil Miss Hobbit
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I really like this one. Straight-forward and not "all is doom" but also realistic.

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#22

My mom was a SAHM in the 90s. She had a degree but my father forced her to SAH. He refused that she worked because ''children need their mom''. My mom chose to open a daycare in the house. My father said it was ''her choice'' so he still expected her to do all the chores, cooking, and tending to me and my 2 siblings. Mom was young at the time (early-mid 20s) so she was not really aware that she was being abused.

They split in 2000 and mom had almost full custody (every other weekend at father's). She worked full-time, and at some point even needed 2 jobs because my father refused to pay child support.

A decade after that mom had a new partner. They were both working and us children had left the house. In the beginning the partner would do half the chores, but gradually he stopped. Then he retired. So he spent his whole days doing nothing, staying home and watching tv, doing only like 5% of the chores. Mom was still working and doing 95% of chores.

They split 2 years ago, mostly due to that. Now I am well into adulthood but currently living with mom because I got severe health issues. The little energy I have I spend it on helping with the chores. My mom gladly says she never has so much help in her life! And I find it astonishing, because I am very disabled at the moment...

If my mom had been in relationships where she was respected I am sure she would have loved being a SAHM and homemaker. She loves being at home, doing canned food, home-made bread, etc. Actually she can't wait to retire to stay home and do those things. But the contexts in which she SAHMed and homemaked were awful and abusive.

So I'd say to young tradwives...1. Is it really your choice? 2. Do you feel fulfilled in your role? 3. Are you respected by your partner, and is your role acknowledged? What would your partner say if you suddenly wanted a job?

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robin aldrich
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

First of all how can a man refuse to pay child support? What kind of POS wouldn't want to make sure their kids are cared for???

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#23

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences It was so lonely

naliedel , Darina Belonogova / pexels Report

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Dragon mama
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

This. Not like "why don't I have anyone to hang out with?" but an inability to genuinely connect with people because you've lost your identity. When I would ask the women i knew what they liked, or what they wanted, I would get blank stares. Sometimes they would seem lost in their thoughts for a min but then I'd get a forced smile and a change of subject. It made me sad.

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#24

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences I highly recommend the book "Feminine Mistake" by Leslie Bennetts. Making yourself completely dependent on someone else is a mistake. Things happen in life. Maybe your marriage really is happy and secure, but people get sick, lose their jobs...things happen. And the women left behind with children and a huge gap in their work history have a rough time.


If you go that route, have a backup plan. Have some money of your own. Keep up your skills, even if it's just part time or occasional consulting. 

Snarffalita , Yan Krukau / pexels Report

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Lil Miss Hobbit
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

THIS. And even if you and your man stay together...there is always the possibility of sudden death or illness.

#25

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences Make sure you're left with a way to support yourself and all of your children should you be left alone with them when you get a little older.

Chances are pretty good you will be. Forty-three percent of first marriages break-up within 15 years

thenletskeepdancing , Karolina Kaboompics / pexels Report

#26

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences Isolating and frustrating as the work is never done. I tended to obsess over cleaning type things (mopping daily) and did not like not having my own money.

kateinoly , Andrea Piacquadio / pexels Report

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Ambry Petersen
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

This is a life thing, not a traditional wife thing. Life takes maintenance. You must eat, sleep, and other things to survive. To eat you have to cook, if you cook, you will need to wash dishes. If you order out you must pay more, so you must work to earn more, (you still have to clean up your trash though). If you sleep in a bed and wear clothes you must wash them when they get dirty. If you have pets you must take care of them. It doesn't matter if you have kids or not. Chores and maintenance are a fact of life

#27

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences I was never a tradwife, but my mother was before she decided f**k this and put herself through college, going all the way to a master’s degree.

My mother in law was a tradwife her whole life, starting in the mid-60s. She regretted it as she got older and tried to enter the workforce. It was pretty much impossible.

AnastasiaNo70 , Polina Tankilevitch / pexels Report

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Ambry Petersen
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Actually considering the internet it's easier than ever. If you have any kind of saleable skill you can find a way to sell it. It requires effort but you can do it. I know quite a few women who have managed it.

#28

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences It was fulfilling joy in my life. I loved it. There were frustrations (as with any job) and fears (all lives get that), but I was glad to be a SAHM.

I didn't ever like that I wa treated by society as a lesser person for it. I wish we women would stop attacking each other, and start appreciating our joyous diversity.

C-Nor , Sergey Makashin / pexels Report

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LB
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Being a SAHM isn't the same as being a tradwife, though. Did this person have their own bank account? A say in major decisions? Etc etc

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#29

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences Whether or not you choose to be home with your children while they're young, prepare yourself to be able to work and make a living. You never know what is going to happen. Be prepared to not have much money beyond essentials. Be prepared to be somewhat isolated, as most women work now. It's not like my parents' generation, when most married women were home with kids and there were lots of opportunities to socialize.

Separate_Farm7131 , Ketut Subiyanto / pexels Report

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Ambry Petersen
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1 week ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

With the internet and social media socializing is not only easier it's almost impossible to avoid.

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#30

“The Work Is Never Done”: 30 Traditional Wives From the 20th Century Share Their Real Experiences I did both, stayed at home until kids were in school, worked as a teacher before and after. I recommend women that want families to find a job that works with kids schedule or work part time when they are young.

Happygar , Tima Miroshnichenko / pexels Report

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Judes
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1 week ago (edited) DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I recommend PARENTS that want families to NEGOTIATE jobS that works with kids schedule or ONE OR BOTH OF THEM work part time when they are young.

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