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Parents are our real-life superheroes. They love us, feed us, care for us, and, oftentimes, their efforts go unappreciated. Especially when we're still little. So it's natural that they have to let out all that pent-up frustration somewhere. Social media is a wonderful place for that. And you can even collect followers while recounting your everyday struggles as a parent.

We have a tradition here at Bored Panda to feature the best posts from parents each month – and March is no exception. Kids just never stop saying and doing the darndest things, do they? So let's celebrate that by checking out what these social media-savvy parents have to say, shall we?

Joking around and venting about parenting online is one thing. But using it to get some advice on parenting is another. A survey by C.S. Mott Children's Hospital found in 2023 that most parents think social media is a great place for getting parenting advice. 80% of the respondents said they use social media to discuss parenting topics. 

The most popular topics that parents seek advice about are toilet training, kids' sleep schedules, nutrition, discipline, behavior problems, vaccinations, daycare, and socializing with other kids. Interestingly, not many parents think it's difficult to distinguish bad advice from good. 3 in 5 parents believe they're good at differentiating the good from the bad.

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2 weeks ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Don't lose heart. My almost 17yr old will still give me a hug and a "love you mum." In public.

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CrunChewy McSandybutt
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2 weeks ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I had one of each. My older son was a real challenge. My younger son was textbook easy. It's almost like they are human beings with their own unique mindsets.

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It can be nice to get some parenting support online. You don't have to wait for an appointment with your physician, and advice from social media is almost always free. However, experts warn parents not to trust any advice blindly. Especially when that advice is coming from fellow parents. 

"Finding parent comradery in this space can have benefits but parents should keep in mind that every family’s experience is different and not everything they hear online may be accurate or the right thing for their child," Mott Poll Co-director Sarah Clark, M.P.H., noted.

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According to experts, parents should be especially careful when sharing information about their children online. 80% of the parents from the same poll feel that other parents overshare on social media. That includes bragging about their children too much or just showing too much of their personal life online.

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2 weeks ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

TIL there’s a town called Jupiter (I’m not from the US). Tbh I too will be disappointed to end up in a town when I expected it to be a trip to the planet! 🤭

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This brings us to a bigger issue that's important when it comes to parenting and social media: 'sharenting.' Luckily, many parents are aware of it and its dangers. 60% of parents believe that they might accidentally reveal the child's personal information that can help identify the child's location or embarrass the child when they're older.

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2 weeks ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I have, on occaision, sang this to some of the first and second graders I teach.

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"A good rule is if you have any doubt, don't share it," Sarah Clark said. "In addition, parents should consult with parents of other children in photos for approval before sharing them on social media."

She also recommends always stopping and thinking before posting. "Before posting, think about whether you’re sharing enough information to get someone else's advice without giving away too much personal information about your family."

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Leah Plunkett, author of Sharenthood: Why We Should Think Before We Talk About Our Kids Online, says that it's also about the child's privacy. "We should think before we talk about our kids online, because all children deserve a private space to play, to make mischief, even make a few mistakes and grow up better for having made them," she told CBC radio.

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2 weeks ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Dinocologist sounds like it came from a Far Side cartoon.

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2 weeks ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Sweet Honey Hot Buns, lol. Call him that, all the time, everywhere. In front of his friends, in public, as a teenager when he gets a girlfriend. Forever.

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When considering if 'sharenting' might be inappropriate, there are two sides of the spectrum to consider. On one side, there's the kind of content where parents might do illegal, dangerous, or criminal activities. According to Plunkett, some parenting influencers are guilty of this.

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But on the other of the oversharing spectrum, there are the parents who might be providing very much-needed support to other parents. Like a mom who might share content related to her child with a rare genetic disorder.

Plunkett says that while "creating spaces to find and share medical and mental health resources" is an upside to 'sharenting,' parents still need to be mindful of kids' privacy.

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2 weeks ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Okay, but if that did happen, it would be pretty cute. Rather uncomfortable to go through though... Kids say the craziest things

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Another reason to share as little about children on social media as possible is to let kids forge their own digital identities. Verywell Mind writes that children (especially adolescents) are still creating their identities, and what they present about themselves online plays a huge role in their formation.

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2 weeks ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

My granddaughter started playing with the slack skin on my arm while I was reading to her. I feel your pain.

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Note: this post originally had 120 images. It’s been shortened to the top 30 images based on user votes.

That's not to say that parents shouldn't share anything about their kids online at all. True, there are some general don'ts, like always thinking before posting and never posting revealing, negative, or critical information. Respecting your child's privacy means either posting anonymously, asking them permission, or never using your child's full name.

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