Everyone can agree, especially non-native speakers, that the English language can get very tricky. Most of us know the feeling of being puzzled by the strange spelling rules and grammar of this language, but the truth is, every language has its own peculiarities. So if you think English is bad enough, check out this hilarious Twitter thread of the weirdest phrases and their literal meanings.

Started by the Twitter user @jazz_inmypants who asked people to share their favorite non-English phrases, the thread was quickly filled with unexpected responses, most of them reminding us how strange some languages are. Scroll below to read the responses.

More info: twitter.com

#1

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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athornedrose 3 weeks ago

omg that's fantastic

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#2

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Vic 3 weeks ago

I'm borrowing this one..

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#3

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

channndler96 Report

Anna von Überwald 3 weeks ago

"Bacon" is not really correct. "Speck" is the fatty part of bacon, therefore you can also refer to you belly fat as "Speck" instead of "Fett" (fat). Literal translation: grief fat

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#4

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

MaireadMRWalsh Report

The Girl on Fire 3 weeks ago

I'm saying "what an odd place to find a lobster" irl from now on

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#5

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

luisa0797 Report

Trixie Argh 3 weeks ago

The real quote actually is "great minds think alike, though fools seldom differ"

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#6

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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AloofFox 3 weeks ago

Cats!!! I’d be happy at this party.

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#7

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

nerderized Report

Ani Archeron 3 weeks ago

imagine the tardis rejecting itself out its own doors

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#8

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Hans 3 weeks ago

May I add: "Mit dem ist nicht gut Kirschen essen", literally "With this guy you cannot easily eat cherries", means that you will encouter a crumpy person.

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#9

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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chi-wei shen 3 weeks ago

It should be written "wurst" instead of "Wurst". The noun Wurst means Sausage but the adjective wurst means it doesn't matter. (In German all nouns start with an uppercase letter.)

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#10

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

AwaisLeghari27 Report

Dynein 3 weeks ago

Germanversion: Milchmädchenrechnung; lit. "milk maid's calculation". It's based on a small folk tale of a milk maid thinking about what she'll buy with the money she'll get for the milk, and what she'll buy for the money when selling THAT etc - and then she spills the milk.

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#11

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Caridina Japonica 3 weeks ago

There are a lot of funny descriptions for remote or unattractive places in germany. Such as "Da liegt der Hund begraben" (This is where the dog has been buried) or "Da willst du nicht tot überm Zaun hängen" (You don't want to hang dead over the fence)

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#12

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Dinetk 3 weeks ago

In Dutch they are called ‘zwembandje’: inflatable ring

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#13

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HANS 3 weeks ago

The deceased, of corpse.

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#14

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Kjorn 3 weeks ago

you can also says: pousser du vieux avec du neuf (pushing old stuff with new stuff) :-)

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#15
average joe@jazz_inmypants Jul 18

everyone please share your favorite not-english word or phrase.

here’s one i just learned.

“Nie mój cyrk, nie moje małpy"

Language: Polish

English Equivalent: “not my problem”

Literal: “not my circus, not my monkey”

Vicky Matamoros
Replying to @jazz_inmypants

In Mexican Spanish we use the phrase “pariendo chayotes”.
It means that you’re doing something really difficult.
The literal translation is “I’m birthing chayotes”.
Chayotes are a type of squash-like vegetable (fruit?) that we eat in Mexico. Yes, those are spines.

8:57 AM - 19 Jul 2019

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Dynein 3 weeks ago

That thought makes me extremely uncomfortable...

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#16

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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ispeak catanese 3 weeks ago

I took it to mean "dancing with one's own sister" or even a nun.

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#17

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Andres Tejeda 3 weeks ago

Being Mexican I heard this a lot as a child. Trying to explain this to my non-Spanish speaking friends was really funny.

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#18

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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janke Leroij 3 weeks ago

my favorite: nie wracaj mi gitara. As a non polish it took some time to understand. Translation: Don't turn my gitar around.

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#19

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Randy Dhuyvetter 3 weeks ago

That just dailed up to eleven O_o

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#20
average joe@jazz_inmypants Jul 18

everyone please share your favorite not-english word or phrase.

here’s one i just learned.

“Nie mój cyrk, nie moje małpy"

Language: Polish

English Equivalent: “not my problem”

Literal: “not my circus, not my monkey”

Replying to @jazz_inmypants

My brother lives in non-PC Spain

2:06 PM - 18 Jul 2019

absolutgrace Report

Dynein 3 weeks ago

That might be problematic to say these days, but I love it. Very succinct and rather self-explanatory.

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#21

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Nadja Lambacher 3 weeks ago

*glaub

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#22

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Lilli 3 weeks ago

...well then. I actually read that.

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#23

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Anna von Überwald 3 weeks ago

brutal. I love it!

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#24

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

wiiingeeet26 Report

comboplush 3 weeks ago

That is a brillant description of taking a nap. :D

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#25

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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PanditoBandito 3 weeks ago (edited)

I'm just going to say "your goats have run to the mountain!"

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#26

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Sander Vermeer 3 weeks ago

It's translation is more like: 'The truth is finally revealed'

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#27

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Marina Wack 3 weeks ago

Occupe-toi* :)

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#28

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Richard Pickman 3 weeks ago

Perkele, the legendary Finnish way of drinking! https://youtu.be/NAl9OyGYxOg

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#29

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Dynein 3 weeks ago

German "alles in Butter" means "everything is alright". Back in the days, fragile things were transported in butter (as in, you poured molten butter over it and then transported the whole hardened block).

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#30

People-Share-Favorite-Foreign-Language-Phrases

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Ryukei_Panda 3 weeks ago (edited)

Endearment terms in French are pretty weird when you think about it. \1 mon petit chou /chouchou = my little cabbage /cabbage-cabbage (for both genders) 2\ ma puce = my flee (parents to their daughter or boyfriend to their girlfriend) \3 * mon lapin = my rabbit (I mostly hear older people call their grandchild like this) >> That's for the most common ones!

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