If you have ever been caught red-handed in a lie, you know how severely embarrassing it can be. Whether it was an innocent fib or full-blown deceit, your mind inevitably starts racing, thinking of all the ways to save your reputation. Luckily for us, though, these stories are hilariously entertaining. Recently, author and columnist Séamas O'Reilly posted a tweet about an elaborate childhood lie that involves a school essay, an "Icelandic Fish Festival" and the King honoring him by his presence and chatting with him directly.

As if the tale is not wild enough, he then asked his followers to share "the best, worst, and most excruciatingly stupid lies" they've ever been busted with — and boy, did they deliver! Thousands of people rolled up their sleeves and typed out the mortifying moments that turned out to be so ridiculous and amusing, that it almost pardons them of their wrongdoings.

So buckle up and grab a bucket of popcorn because we at Bored Panda have collected some of the funniest stories from this thread. Upvote the ones you liked most and be sure to share your own embarrassing mishaps with us in the comments!

Recently, author and columnist Séamas O'Reilly shared a wild story about how he got caught in an elaborate lie as a child

His tweet inspired other people to chime in with similar experiences

#1

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ginkomortus Report

October
Community Member
2 months ago

As one should

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Nearly everyone engages in manipulation and exaggeration of the things they have seen, heard, and experienced, or simply tries to pull a fast one on someone every now and then. But even when deceivers think of detailed plans and go over the smallest details a thousand times, one slip and the deceit is out in the open. After all, if you’re going to lie, you should be very good at it. Otherwise, get comfortable with being mercilessly teased by anyone who found out about your little mishap.

To learn more about the field of deception, we reached out to Aldert Vrij, a professor of Social Psychology at the University of Portsmouth, UK, and the author of Detecting Lies and Deceit: Pitfalls and Opportunities. He explained that people sometimes make things up because they are too confident they can get away with it. "Also, people often lie to cover up wrongdoing. Just to admit wrongdoing straightaway means that the game is over. Denying wrongdoing (by lying) always gives a chance to get away with [it]," he told Bored Panda.

#2

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whoamigamling Report

Loading Screen Tips🇺🇦
Community Member
2 months ago

*crash* 1:"ohhh carp" 2:"JERRY WHAT DID YOU DO?!" 1:"I don't know it was in the way!" 2:"Well put it back together!" 1:"Im trying, I'm trying."

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#3

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alexsiskiy Report

Millie
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2 months ago (edited)

if my friend got to befriend beavers id be very jealous

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While it may be hard to admit to mischief, it’s even harder to deny that hearing about these lies being called out in the open is a source of pure entertainment. After all, when people sense that their fibs can quickly get busted, they have to choose whether they want to tell the truth or double down. And that split-second decision can turn a well-crafted lie into an embarrassing disaster. Professor Vrij believes that we’re eager to read these amusing stories "because often people try hard to get themselves out of the situation whereas all they are doing is digging a deep hole for themselves."

#4

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Heather Resatz
Community Member
2 months ago

Omg I love this!!

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#5

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BJFetterolf Report

grotesqueer
Community Member
2 months ago

I really want to read the poem now!

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#6

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MIShouldTalk Report

October
Community Member
2 months ago

Thats a cool embellishment of the truth

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We also managed to get in touch with Dr. Chris Street, a senior lecturer in Cognitive Psychology at Keele University, UK, who specializes in lie detection. According to him, research suggests that people are very good deceivers. "Liars do not avoid eye contact or make other bodily movements that we can use to detect them. As far as we know, there is no equivalent of Pinocchio’s nose that we can use to spot the liar," he told us.

"It is perhaps not surprising, then, that we are not particularly good at spotting lies. People tend to be ever so slightly more accurate than random guessing, but it is a very slight difference. Training to detect a lie can help a little, but not by much." Dr. Street explained that when we decide if someone is lying or telling the truth, we tend to guess that they are telling the truth rather than think that perhaps they are lying.

#7

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hystericalwitch Report

Allison B
Community Member
2 months ago

Omg. Poor stepmom. I mean the kid was 8 so I guess that makes sense, but that's still got to be embarrassing.

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#8

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mike_gaz Report

Potty pagan panda
Community Member
2 months ago

😂 not a believed lie I’m sure

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#9

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RealTimShady42 Report

grotesqueer
Community Member
2 months ago

Oh wow. Hopefully this was a while ago. Could be quite a nightmare for any trans man to get that kind of attitude. Calling to pay a gynecologist bill could be awful to begin with, not to mention with this kind of reception.

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Dr. Street is also the author of the ALIED theory — The Adaptive Lie Detector account. His research showed "that we tend to guess others are telling the truth because making a lie-truth judgment is a very difficult one (after all, liars look just like truth-tellers). When there are no reliable pieces of information around to help us separate liars and truth-tellers, we rely on our past experience with the world, which is that most of us tell the truth most of the time," he explained.

The ALIED theory argues that a lie that is more likely to be believed is one that has reliable evidence that shows that the lie is actually a truth, Dr. Street told us. "This might sound contradictory, but this may not be as difficult as it sounds."

"Offering insider knowledge that supposedly would only be known by those who attended an event, for example, could be achieved by speaking to someone who attended that event," the lecturer continued. "Doctoring photographs may also lend credibility to a statement. Adding these 'convincers' may increase their believability, but it’s a high-risk strategy: if the person who is judging the statement has the means and sophistication to check up on your supposedly checkable detail (such as law enforcement), you could find yourself in a lot of trouble," Dr. Street explained.

#10

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stephenmatlock Report

October
Community Member
2 months ago

That takes a lot of guts and a lazy teacher

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#11

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hmjoneswriter Report

Man in the ceiling
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2 months ago

I always wonder how people get away with lies like this lol

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#12

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Ashleychen1317 Report

Caprichosa
Community Member
2 months ago

Shrek is a amazing hero! 🤣 I'm curious about the grading you got for that essay 😅

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While studies find that our ability to detect lies is no more accurate than a flip of a coin, professor Aldert Vrij pointed out that several conditions can allow us to spot someone’s fibs. "It will help to know the person well," he told us. "It also helps to know a lot of background information (evidence) about the topic so that the lie can be detected by comparing the statement with that evidence," Vrij agreed with Dr. Street’s line of thinking.

Finally, it helps to use specific verbal lie detection tools that have been developed, Vrij added. However, this is not straightforward. "[To use them] you need to know which questions to ask and which verbal cues to pay attention to. An example of one tool is to ask someone to back up their statement with independent evidence the interviewer can check, such as named witnesses who can confirm the statement, CCTV footage, receipts, phone use, etc.," he explained. "Truth tellers typically provide more evidence that can be checked than lie tellers," Professor Vrij concluded.

#13

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emdashrights Report

Meeple13
Community Member
2 months ago

Oh, bollocks.

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#14

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PiperClover Report

Qibli of the SandWings
Community Member
2 months ago

“It’s big brain time.”

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#15

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Aly.J
Community Member
2 months ago

I'll meet you at the top of the coconut tree!

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#16

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FYAB10 Report

October
Community Member
2 months ago

My oldest fell of a horse and informed me that when you fall off you have to give the whole riding class apple pie. So the next week I show up with three home baked pies. And juist before we enter riding class, she informes me she made it up cause she craved apple pie.

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#17

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FeralPyrologist Report

Josh Stevenson
Community Member
2 months ago

Not sure if this counts as stolen Valor or not..

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#18

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JoshAGrady Report

Broad Panda
Community Member
2 months ago

So the teacher was also full of it.

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#19

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elektradarling Report

Bored Doggy
Community Member
2 months ago

risky!

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#20

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PurpleHatDave Report

Crowsgoin*brrr*
Community Member
2 months ago

That's out of this world

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#21

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morrissey2020 Report

Judes
Community Member
2 months ago

Haha. This is the worst.

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#22

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MEVring Report

ShareMusic
Community Member
2 months ago

I want to read the poem!

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#23

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CalamyJ Report

Potty pagan panda
Community Member
2 months ago

If you repeat a lie often enough it becomes the truth

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#24

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cornelia_wyder Report

Harrison Miller
Community Member
2 months ago

"I read about in it my crystal ball that can see into the future."

#25

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millar_sinclair Report

Mouse
Community Member
2 months ago

This is just a child with a great imagination, cute

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#26

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WhatTheeEll Report

Rebekah
Community Member
2 months ago

My son had to do a similar reporting assignment in 1st grade. My favorite was "Chekrs thrw up", with a hand drawn picture of our cat Checkers and a HUGE pile of puke. Guess it was the highlight of his weekend. It's still on my fridge. It's that damn awesome. Son is now 16.

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#27

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Oriol Coll
Community Member
2 months ago

Wow…

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#28

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pompeygeorge Report

Euphorique
Community Member
2 months ago

Someone plz explain?

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#29

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TazorTullock Report

.V.
Community Member
2 months ago

Ha chocolate starfish

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#30

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beggie_smalls Report

The Holy Penguin
Community Member
2 months ago

Lmao

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Note: this post originally had 73 images. It’s been shortened to the top 30 images based on user votes.