While some of the things we learn don't necessarily make us smarter, they can definitely arouse our desire to learn more. Or at least help us continue our stalling conversations. And Twitter account WTF Facts is dedicated to collecting and sharing these random tidbits of information. From celebrity lifestyle to international relations, the project covers a wide range of topics, which is probably the reason why its feed remains so fresh and interesting. Continue scrolling and check out some of the most popular tweets WTF Facts have ever released!

Knowing obscure facts isn't just fun. It's also good for our mental health. For example, experts say that playing trivia games can provide a dopamine rush much like gambling, but without the negative effects. 

Even if our trivia games differ, the benefits are there. Whether we're playing Trivial Pursuit at home or attending a pub trivia night, the basic premise remains the same: we experience the thrill of providing correct answers to questions about lesser-known facts.

"You get a rush or a neuroreward signal or a dopamine burst from winning,” John Kounios, Ph.D., professor of psychology and director of the doctoral program in applied cognitive and brain sciences at Drexel University in Pennsylvania, told Healthline. “I think whenever you’re challenged with a trivia question and you happen to know it, you get a rush. It’s sort of like gambling.”

Kounios said the benefits can also be similar to those of playing a video game.

However, unlike gambling and even video games, Kounios said trivia is generally not a problematic habit.

“I don’t think there are any pitfalls,” he said. “Like anything else that’s fun, it takes up time.”

A librarian from California, Sarah Kishler, loves trivia games and enjoys attending a monthly pub trivia night in which a team of librarians participates.

"Learning facts so that I can get better at trivia is definitely a passion of mine," she told Healthline. "Getting a question right is definitely very satisfying to me."

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Guido Pisano
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Same in Italy... You're allowed to disobey an order that you think is illegal...

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Over the past decade or so, pub trivia nights that are popular in the United Kingdom appear to have grown in other parts of Europe and the United States.

Enthusiasts like Kishler enjoy getting to interact with people at these events, especially compared to electronic trivia games.

She has learned that doing well at these social trivia games gives her "a feeling of validation" and increases her self-esteem.

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River Webb
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

yeah Disney often adapts its stories to be appropriate for children, eventually leading everybody to only remember the Disney version and not the original

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"I love general knowledge, geography, literature, music, science trivia," Kishler explained. "I just love to accumulate knowledge. I like the exercise that it gives my brain and memory."

She doesn't think of herself as a competitive person but nevertheless enjoys getting a bit amped up at trivia games.

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Jonathan
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Same thing happened in Edinburgh, some students noticed a wall wasn't quite a real wall and they rediscovered the Vaults.

Raven Sheridan
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

So..? Is that a case of finders keepers or what?

Doggo
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

"well i guess this is enough room for renovation"

Wyn Williams
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

It had only been hidden for a decade, the war pushed the original occupants out the Turkish man was one of the turks that moved in after they previous people knew all about it

Roxy Eastland
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Thank you. I was wondering how a whole community could forget something like this.

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John M
Community Member
1 year ago (edited) Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I visited some of these underground cities and they are impressive. They were used when the mongol hordes raided the above city and kept them safe. Ventilation was taken care of, as well as security with self sealing rock doors that could only be opened from inside at the main entrances for each floor. Each floor could be closed off independently. They also has churches, food & water stores for a long period of time.

Mark Howell
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Did he meet Lara Croft trying to find a way out ;o)

KT
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Holy crap! This is the stuff of dreams! That must have been so dam exciting to explore

Lion's Stare
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I've been here on a tour. It was a place where Christians lived and hid for centuries from people who would do them harm

James Dean
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I would have kept this secret and set up a base

Tammy Ralph
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I can't breathe thinking about it.

amm
Community Member
9 months ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Am I weird for wanting to live in an underground city?

Jaybird3939
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Imagine all that amazing history right under your feet.

Anja Schmidt
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Thanx for that flash ... took me some hours XD ... also watch Göbekli tepe ...

M Kate McCulloch
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

a 10,000 bedroom home for sale in Turkey.

Judy Crozier
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

No need for that extension, then!

Lisa Chambers
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Oh I saw the exploration videos of this! So interesting!

Cybele Spanjaard
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

My cousin came back from a trip to Turkey and his most memorable time was being able to see through some of the underground villages that are still considered viable. The engineering feats alone re air and smoke exhausts, stores as well as disposing of used and waste matter. So many possibilities still not known.

HorseMuse
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

What a find! A treasure !

Paige Garberding
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Wow! What a find! Hope there's a book out there about it.

Joolz Cat
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Ooo I wonder if he was a librarian.

Amanda Hunter
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Oh wow, he could have run it as an Hotel!

Triv
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I'd say "Renovation Won!"

Dave Chapman
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

That's quite the basement "Den"...can you get a pool table down there somewhere...and a wet bar?? ;)

lara
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I remember my archaeology professor saying [and this was before von Daniken] that what we know about our past was the equivalent of a single grain of sand in a bucket.

Baoer Sun
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

City of the future! (and past)

Durga GS
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I know this one!! Came in bright side YouTube channel

Loretta
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Why did those people live underground?

A
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

That is insane! Wow! Take that apartment mirror girl!

Emma ʢ◉ᴥ◉ʡ
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Think about just nocking down a wall and finding a really old tunnel

Nubis Knight
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Check out the Oppenheimer cellar-labyrinth in Germany: 40 km of subterranean cellars and Corridors built in the middle age to store merchandises.

Sergio Bicerra
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

"Honeyyy... you havent cleaned the basemente in years..."

AntiAntiVaxx
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Fallout shelter but make it middle eastern

Peter Kennett
Community Member
1 year ago (edited) Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Another misinterpretation of history. The citizens of Derinkuyo and neighboring Kaymakli have known of these tunnels continuously. In the early 20th century the inhabitants, Greek Orthodox citizens, were still using the underground cities to escape periodic waves of Ottoman persecution. When the Christian inhabitants of the region were expelled in 1923, the tunnels became used by local farmers as storage areas. It was in 1963 that the area became open to tourism.

Chris Watson
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Why would you live underground? Interesting

Alex Hamilton
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

We have one in London too : We call it the tube.

Brandi VanSteenwyk
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

An incredible find. Wondering how it stayed hidden for so long. Do they not have earthquakes in Turkey?

Jill Ferguson
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I have never heard of this underground city.

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“People really like to have some expertise on something and the brain is very good at focusing on things that you’re interested in,” Deborah Stokes, Ph.D., L.P.C., B.C.N., a psychologist in Virginia, who focuses on neurotherapy, told Healthline.

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River Webb
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

she was an amazing woman, her death was such a tragedy

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According to Stokes, learning large bodies of knowledge can often start with trivia. And people who are interested in trivia can be brainy, have a high IQ, and be smart on a lot of levels.

However, Kounios said that people aren’t necessarily better at trivia games just because they’re more educated.

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Láďa Durchánek
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I can barely draw a stick figure and if instructions have more than one step it is safer to write them down.

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"Some people soak up facts,” Kounios added. "Plenty of people with a lot more education may not remember what they had for breakfast yesterday morning."

"In typical people, my observation, not backed up by any research, is that their interest in trivia is confined to topics that they are generally interested in. So if a person is very interested in history, then they may either seek out history trivia, or they might just naturally pick it up in the course of learning about nontrivial aspects of history."

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Monty Is Fiennes
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I love Dave Grohl, but he isn't the only artist to have done this....

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See Also on Bored Panda
See Also on Bored Panda

Stokes pointed out that trying to retain information about things we're interested in can be like a good exercise for the frontal cortex as the brain ages.

"That’s the first thing to go with injury or with age if we don’t use it," she said.

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The Dave
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

The bulb is located in the bay of a fire station. Go check it out!

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Of course, it's completely understandable if the pandemic has drained your brain of the desire to learn and flooded it with boredom and tiredness instead. In an earlier Bored Panda interview, Lenore Skenazy, the president of Let Grow and the founder of the Free-Range-Kids movement, said that before we can become curious again, we have to do the hard part: get off the couch. Force yourself out the door. Why? Because beyond your four walls, things are never exactly the same. Weather, animals, people, sounds, smells, clouds—they’re all swirling about."

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S. Tor Storm
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1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Actually, she served in WWI and also helped defeat the romans

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Lenore continued: "Ask yourself to start noticing new things. I did that this morning with a friend. We took a walk around our neighborhood and started looking for interesting details in the homes and buildings we passed. It went from a walk down streets we’d seen a million times to a sort of treasure hunt. And the big thing we were really hunting for? Curiosity! When you’re curious you’re alive again—noticing, thinking, making connections. You can’t do that if there’s no new information coming in. So your first step is to force yourself out of a rut by leaving the house (harder during the pandemic, but not impossible)."

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Bill
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017