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"A bird? But you're a fox photographer, aren't you?!" A comment I get so often when I post a bird photo. True, I adore foxes, but in fact I love (photographing) anything that breathes (with the exception of coots, that is). In recent years, foxes, with their captivating nature, have often succeeded in luring me to them. And I must admit that this has sometimes been at the expense of the birds. But that doesn't alter the fact that I love to see and capture these winged friends!

My approach to photographing foxes does not fundamentally differ from capturing birds. I just immerse myself in the species and I try to capture their personality or specific properties. Although you can roughly say that the level of intelligence of an animal determines the complexity of its character, every species has its own intriguing characteristics.

Whether it concerns foxes or birds; I have a preference for a certain 'connection' with an animal. I like to take personal and intimate photos and I prefer an animal to be completely comfortable and just doing what it would do without my presence.

If you would like to see some of my previous Bored Panda posts featuring fox photography, you can click here, here, here, here, here, here, here, or here.

More info: Instagram | Facebook | roeselienraimond.com

The unique thing about birds is, of course, their ability to fly and capturing this properly is a great challenge. Something that has become considerably easier with the new animal tracking techniques.

There are also many birds that live on or around the water. This offers great opportunities to capture them swimming or bathing. I also like to make use of the water by photographing them with their beautiful mirror image. Actually, every aspect of a bird is worth it, whether they are eating, cleaning, raising the little ones. These are all potentially wonderful (photo) moments!

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Just like with fox photography, I let my feelings guide me and I simply photograph what touches me. The advantage with birds is that they are literally everywhere, so there’s no need to travel far.

At the beginning of my photography, I used to go to hotspots for rare species, such as waxwings in a berry bush or a dancing dipper in a stream. Or a night heron that managed to catch fish through a thick layer of duckweed. But, unlike many bird watchers, I am not a species hunter and can enjoy an ‘ordinary’ species just as much. I love to listen to starlings singing during courtship as if their lives depended on it. And their colors are so beautiful. And their murmurations; such an amazing phenomenon, I just so want to witness!

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#4

Blue(S)

Blue(S)

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janet-burnett88 avatar
Wyndmere
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

** OH, what a beautiful morning, oh what a beautiful day. I can't help having this feeling everything's going my way.** Sing it with me now - 1 2 3 4, ** oh, what a beautiful morning....**

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Sparrows, swallows, ducks or swans can make me very happy. Or those tiny three-toed sandpipers that run across the beach like wind-up animals, even in the heaviest storm! Oh, and did I mention I have a huge soft spot for herons? The funny grey herons, the oh so graceful great white egret. That fantastic bittern that, despite its somewhat clumsy appearance, can do a perfect reed imitation. And did you know that there are heron species that fish with bait? As you can read, I could go on and on about birds… Actually, each species of bird has its own charm that makes them an inexhaustible source of inspiration for me.

#6

Morning Has Broken

Morning Has Broken

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Wyndmere
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Wet tail feathers scattered a trail of water droplets that glisten in the glow of early sunlight. (Zoom in to see.)

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#7

We Are One

We Are One

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Rob
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

We have these nesting around the house. The ones born this year have just left.

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It applies to many animals, but especially to birds: too much enthusiasm scares them away, as it looks like you are hunting them (which is true, in a way). The trick is not to be too eager and turn yourself into an insignificant piece of furniture. Approaching them slowly and patiently helps. I first observe the behavior of the bird and if I see that it is getting nervous, then I know that there is its limit and I stop. Personally, I like to include the habitat of the bird in the image. An additional advantage is that you don't need to get very close.

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The foundation of all my photography is a genuine interest and love for my subject. I can be completely absorbed in watching a preening sparrow, a hunting heron or a fly catching duckling. I want to get to know them, understand them. I see them. At those moments, when my thinking stops and I become one with the subject and the nature around us, my photos just come automatically. I think that in this way the feeling I experience at that moment is more or less translated into the image and becomes tangible to the viewer.

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#14

Dreamy Duckling

Dreamy Duckling

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#15

Black-Crowned Night Heron

Black-Crowned Night Heron

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#16

Rendez-Voud At Sunrise

Rendez-Voud At Sunrise

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Wyndmere
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

You're right Charles, the view of the sunrise from here is spectacular!

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#18

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Wyndmere
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

This bird must have started really early; he's got a whole beak full of worms.

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#22

Teal And Orange

Teal And Orange

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#23

Narcissus

Narcissus

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janet-burnett88 avatar
Wyndmere
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

B-b-b-b-b-b. ... just a little baby blowing bubbles in the bath water

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#24

Mellow Yellow

Mellow Yellow

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Wyndmere
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9 months ago (edited) DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

She sings the song of her people to welcome the morning light.

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#26

Bittern Times

Bittern Times

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Wyndmere
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Looks like a curved knife blade jutting up from a bale of cotton balls.

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#27

High Speed Hummingbird

High Speed Hummingbird

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#29

Dipping

Dipping

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Wyndmere
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

A replica of this moment would make a beautiful paper weight for my desk.

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#32

Awakenings

Awakenings

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