A single episode of Hell’s Kitchen or MasterChef is enough to realize how much guts it takes to become a chef. Working under so much pressure, your blood boiling like it was on the menu is the norm in a restaurant kitchen. And being shouted at is a polite way to confirm you’re still in. On the other side of the cooking industry, crashing hopes and dreams are washed ashore on moldy food containers as seen on Kitchen Nightmares. Whether you’re doing good or not, it never gets easier.

So this time, we are looking at the culinary school grads who have likely been to hell and back to see what cooking tips they have to share. Thanks to one Redditor who posed the question “What are some golden tips to cooking you didn’t learn in culinary school?” on r/Cooking, we can now learn their useful tricks without selling our sanity to the kitchen.

It turns out, learning stuff the "normal way," aka tuning in to a "how to make an omelet" video on YouTube, may just as well do the job.

#1

Useful-Cooking-Tips Not a food tip but a cooking tip.... a falling knife has no handle. If you drop a knife, get the hell out of the way and let it hit the floor. Washing it is easy enough. Try to catch it and you could be visiting the emergency room.

TwoForSlashing , Nenad Stojkovic Report

sorlag110
Community Member
5 months ago

Really good advice and a memorable proverb

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#2

Useful-Cooking-Tips If you're a home cook always clean up after your self while you're cooking. You'll thank yourself after you've eaten and you're full and you don't have a sink full of dishes and stuff to put away everywhere.

DarlingDrak3 , Erich Ferdinand Report

Ocelotty1
Community Member
5 months ago

CAYG (Cage) - clean as you go

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#3

Useful-Cooking-Tips Recipes are a road map. You don't have to follow them exactly, its ok to deviate. Unless you are baking, in which case, follow the recipe exactly.

CrowEyedWolf , AVID Vines Report

Tien
Community Member
5 months ago

And weigh your ingredients while baking instead of using cups

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To find out more about the subreddit r/Cooking, where the “What are some golden tips to cooking you didn’t learn in culinary school?” question was posted, Bored Panda reached out to the moderator u/zem, who told us more about the community.

The Reddit user u/zem explained that r/cooking has evolved over time “to stress the fact the membership is interested in cooking rather than just food.” Hence, the moderator team has disallowed pictures of food without a complete recipe attached.

“Compare r/tonightsdinner to see what we were trying to discourage; that's a great subreddit too, but it's focused more on the food than on how the reader can make it for themselves,” u/zem added.

#4

Useful-Cooking-Tips You can use the stem of broccoli. Just peel, slice and fry it in the pan, it's delicious.

Buddingastronomer , accordingtoelle.com Report

Tien
Community Member
5 months ago

Wait.... there are people who don't use the stems?

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#5

Professional chef here. Hot pans make a world of difference. Never start anything in a cold pan.

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Jennifer Mansell
Community Member
5 months ago

Except for duck breast.

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#6

Useful-Cooking-Tips Learn cooking techniques instead of recipes.

Don't approach recipes like they're magic spells in the Harry Potter universe. If you wiggle your nose wrong or put in a spec to much of some seasoning you're not going to end up with a completely different dish.

Alton Brown does an incredible job of teaching a cooking technique and then showing you a recipe that applies that technique. If you learn a process instead of a rote recipe you will know how to cook dozens of dishes, and it's really the only way to develop skills in the kitchen.

gkevinkramer , epicurious.com Report

Daria Z
Community Member
5 months ago

True. After I learned the basic principle of cooking risotto I can now do it with any ingredients that are available.

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The moderator also said that the team behind the community is here not because they’re cooking experts, but rather because “we spend a lot of time on Reddit and are basically volunteering some time and effort to keep the community running smoothly.”

The subreddit, which now has 2.2 million members, describes itself as “a place for the cooks of Reddit and those who want to learn how to cook.”

#7

Take a small hand towel and either loop it through a belt loop or between your waist and your belt so it hangs over your leg. As you move around, then, you always have something to wipe your hands/your instruments on and you don't need to go out of your way to do it!

-Pianoteeth Report

troufaki13
Community Member
5 months ago

I always do this and I feel so chef-y :)

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#8

The only recipe that should have only one clove of garlic in it is a recipe for one clove of garlic. Two MINIMUM people.

Bigolekern Report

Foxxy (The Original)
Community Member
5 months ago

Unless you are someone that isn’t a huge garlic eater.

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#9

When making a sauce for your pasta, you should add some of the water you used to boil the pasta into the sauce. This will help the sauce bind better to the pasta and make it taste better.

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Bill
Community Member
5 months ago

Most plumbers don't put the starch water down the drain.

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#10

ALWAYS use real butter, not margarine.

Earthicus Report

Laura Broad
Community Member
5 months ago (edited)

Not a great tip for vegans or people with allergies/intolerances though.. What’s a good substitute?

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#11

Useful-Cooking-Tips Pay attention to all your senses. Sauteing things like onions sound different at different stages. More of a hiss at the start as the steam escapes settling down to a crackle once all that's left its vegetable and fat. Similarly everything you cook will have subtle changes to the way they smell as they cook. There have been many times when I have been multitasking and my nose has alerted me to check on whatever I have in the oven. I'm not talking about smelling burning but just the subtle changes as certain stages of cooking are reached. Eventually it becomes second nature.

theoakking , Mokeneco Report

Dippin Dot
Community Member
5 months ago

I can tell when it's time to check cookies by smell. I made cookies last week for the first time my boyfriend was with me and he didn't believe me until he saw it in action. I warned him I have a sensitive nose!

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#12

Add about a half of a tablespoon of sugar to your chili or spaghetti sauce. It takes some of the acidity out.

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JuJu
Community Member
5 months ago

Dark chocolate and cinnamon for a wonderful chili.

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#13

Extra Virgin Olive Oil is not for frying things! It has a very low smoke point and will break down. For higher (but still not very high) heat, you want regular Olive Oil, not Extra Virgin.

CA1900 Report

JuJu
Community Member
5 months ago

Clarified butter or ghee are great. Especially for Schnitzel :)

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#14

Useful-Cooking-Tips You can use soy sauce or fish sauce as a substitute for salt for a better umami taste. Also, because you'll need less due to the concentrated flavour, it'll naturally be less sodium.

Aine8 , unknown Report

sorlag110
Community Member
5 months ago

Miso paste is a great salt substitute for a really deep umami.

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#15

Useful-Cooking-Tips Salt in the hand, not in the pan. When adding salt to a dish, try not to hang a 5 pound box over it.

Importchef , Wild Foods Report

Sarcasm101
Community Member
5 months ago

Charles Boyle taught me this (B99)

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#16

Mise en place. Have all your stuff lined up and ready to go before you start. You don't want something to burn because you're busy looking for the tablespoon or opening a can of something.

Tacocatx2 Report

troufaki13
Community Member
5 months ago

Also have all the ingredients prepped and ready for use.

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#17

Always scrape the ingredients from the cutting board into a pot with the back of the knife, it will help the blade stay sharp longer

bookmole86 Report

Oathbraker
Community Member
5 months ago

Not if it's a wooden cutting board. Though you can use the bottom of porcelain plates as a cheap sharpener. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKsIBtskdjM

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#18

Keep it simple. Something with 3-4 ingredients that go really well together is better than something with 12 ingredients that clash with each other.

daneoid Report

Jasmine Donald
Community Member
5 months ago

don't clash, just mash!

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#19

Useful-Cooking-Tips Salt early, salt late. Adding salt at different points in cooking dramatically affects results.

labretirementhome , Thomas Brueckner Report

Danieletc
Community Member
5 months ago

They spelled "affects" correctly, a good sign.

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#20

Useful-Cooking-Tips There’s literally no point, and even a health hazard, to “rinse” pre-cut chicken and salmon.

velvthamr , Jim Hammer Report

Steve Barnett
Community Member
5 months ago

By rinsing chicken under a faucet/tap you are splashing any potential germs/bacteria all over the shop.

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#21

Useful-Cooking-Tips Electric stoves are much hotter than gas. A high setting on gas will get you a nice sear, but the same on electric will burn. It's not something to worry about in the kitchen, but definitely at home.

Azuenz , Tim Patterson Report

sorlag110
Community Member
5 months ago

Depends on the stoves really, I've had gas stoves that would burn things to a crisp on high, and bad electric stoves that barely got things to boil on full.

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#22

A master chef told me this in culinary school: "you can always stop cooking." Take it off the burner or out of the oven if you need to. Surprisingly helpful tip

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80 Van
Community Member
5 months ago

I'm sorry, what?

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#23

Always use cold water to mix with flour or cornstarch to make your gravy. It won't get lumpy.

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Roadkill The Brave
Community Member
5 months ago

Put the water in the freezer before you need it. The colder the water the better the mix, also make sure all your cornstarch has disolved before you pour it into your pan. Also also, cornstarch disolved easier in cold cinnamon in hot. Fun stuff. Don't just throw cornstarch in the pan thinking it acts like flour.

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#24

Useful-Cooking-Tips Please don’t buy pre-marinated meats in butchers and grocery stores, they’re usually older cuts of meat being ‘rescued’ with a marinade to cover the unfreshness and smell.

seeeyyaa , Gonzalo Vega González-Capitel Report

Foxxy (The Original)
Community Member
5 months ago

If no-one buys any of the pre marinated meats then it will all just end up being dumped. There is nothing wrong with the marinated meats even if they are the “older” meats, doesn’t mean they are off/spoiled.

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#25

Timers. I always forget I have something going on the stove while I'm cutting something across the kitchen. Timers save lives.

squirreldstar Report

Chris F.
Community Member
5 months ago

I had a timer that was small and clipped to my pocket. Very convenient.

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#26

Make your own stock.

Save the parts of veggies you didn't use like ends of onions, inners of peppers, and chicken bones in a ziplock in the freezer. Just make sure you don't put anything bitter like cabbage or brocolli in. Also never put lemon rind in, it will make it super bitter and inedible. Sweet things like carrots or squash are a must, even pieces of apples are delicious. And I always make sure to put in some celery. Put it all straight from freezer bag to pot, cover with water, throw in a few bay leaves and salt and pepper and simmer for like two hours.

I always try to have chicken stock on hand... so much better than store bought broth, and you control the sodium. Your soups will never be the same. Also delicious to use to cook rice

______yikes Report

Yeah, you heard
Community Member
5 months ago

This comment is hidden. Click here to view.

If this is supposed to save resources or money, I'm pretty sure that boiling veg scraps for TWO HOURS is a total waste of gas /electricity.

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#27

Useful-Cooking-Tips A few drops of a hot sauce like Crystal or a fish sauce can be unrecognizable in a vinaigrette, dip or sauce but it can take it to otherworldly levels. A touch of heat, umami, sugar or acid can turn a flat dish into something people crave. Little drops, add more. Stop when you taste it and start salivating.

OviliskTwo , Joel Olives Report

Jasmine Donald
Community Member
5 months ago

oooooo.....yummy!

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#28

Useful-Cooking-Tips Using scissors to cut things. Cherry tomatoes, dough, pizza, some cuts of meat, veggies.... So much faster, less to clean up and way cleaner cuts.

Aszshana , amazon.com Report

ML
Community Member
5 months ago

I can imagine the tomatoes when cutting them. I bet I would have more squished tomatoes on the floor than the ones wich are cut neatly.

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#29

Useful-Cooking-Tips You'll move faster if you maintain the saying of 'Everything has a home, and if it's not in my hand, it's in its home.' This way, you can rely on everything being exactly in its place.
Also, stay clean. Not just by wiping up crumbs after you use a cutting board (keep a sanitized towel nearby for a quick wipe and it'll become second nature), but by always keeping 'landing spaces' clear. You go faster when your space is flexible, and that only happens if you stay clean.

indigoHatter , amateurgourmet.com Report

BorPand8
Community Member
5 months ago

Looks like they're throwing away lots of good bell pepper there...

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#30

Useful-Cooking-Tips Work like an assembly line. Cut all the ends off, then peel everything, then split everything, then slice. Having 500 veggies to chop will take so long if you do each, from beginning to end, individually. When you change jobs or motions or tools, you slow down to recalibrate. The less you change actions, the faster you can get.

tropexuitoo , Marc Kjerland Report

Daria Z
Community Member
5 months ago

This should be higher. It really works.

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Note: this post originally had 72 images. It’s been shortened to the top 30 images based on user votes.