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Vintage ads are a fascinating glimpse into the past. They show us what people were buying and how they were living. Old commercials for food and beverages reflect products that could’ve been found in household pantries at the time. Ads featuring home appliances or entertainment technologies revealed advancements and innovations, while the promotion of clothes, hairstyles, and accessories offered a look into fashion trends.

A Facebook page called “Old Ads, Vintage Advertising, Slogans” allows us to take a peek at popular products and services of the past. Buckle up, as we’re bringing you back to the time when commercials weren’t skillfully crafted videos but merely paper posters with bold headlines and bright illustrations.

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Old Ads, Vintage Advertising, Slogans Report

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Anna Stephenson
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

What could possibly go wrong with combining, water, electricity and gas together!?

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The history of advertising could be traced back to the first American newspaper ad in 1704, featured in the Boston News Letter. Until the 1800s, print promotions were limited only to text. Thereafter, the production of newspapers rapidly increased and became affordable and accessible to the working class. To keep people engaged, advertisers started to get innovative by adding visuals to their ads.

News LetterWith printing advancements and new technologies, the 20th century brought forward visually crowded ads that included pages detailed with elaborate information. From newspapers and magazines to billboards and transport machines, the 1900s started a whole movement of advertising.

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Old Ads, Vintage Advertising, Slogans Report

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Robert T
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I was think that there isn't that much wrong with this, until I looked in the tree!

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David
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I'd say this one stood the test of time. Oreo is still around and kids still do this.

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Successful ads from the 20th century had to stand out from the others and possess a unique look in order to sell a product or service. To achieve this, it was common to include bright and striking colors with dramatic illustrations or comic book-style drawings.

Printed commercials also portrayed idealized scenes of people and families and incorporated relatable middle-class references. Cheesy taglines and slogans were also a very important part of advertisements, which made them powerful and long -lasting. Various eye-catching fonts were also a great way to make the promotional poster stand out. From brush strokes to the narration of tales, these ads were creative and ever so captivating.

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Old Ads, Vintage Advertising, Slogans Report

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David
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Wait - so they wanted you to go around with your eye swollen shut for 10 days before trying their product?

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Ace
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

They seem to have used Homer Simpson's "Blue Pants" as the model for the poster on the fence.

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At the time, there were few regulations for advertising, so promoters relied on their own judgments. That’s why some of these commodities that were advertised and considered normal back then would now raise eyebrows or even receive hardcore disapproval. Commercials that preceded the civil rights movement employed sexism and racism and were known to spread ill-advised information.

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Let’s take an old 7Up slogan, "Why we have the youngest customers in the business..." that recommends mixing this product with baby's milk. A lot of people believed that soda had medicinal properties, so this brand started advertising their own product as essential to a baby's health.

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Deeelite
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Okay people they are not all fails but they are vintage - just enjoy it

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Michael Braisher
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

A revelation when portable televisions were affordable and decent. For ladies like this, technology had already arrived.

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When health concerns about cigarettes began in the 1930s, tobacco companies turned to doctors in order to diminish the worries about smoking. Thus, cigarette advertisements with physicians were born to add credibility. They typically featured statements like “More doctors smoke Camels than any other cigarette” or “Doctors recommend Camels to their patients.”

Besides causing health concerns, vintage ads like “The Harder A Wife Works, The Cuter She Looks” and the inclusion of racial stereotypes and discrimination deeply promoted problematic social issues that wouldn’t fly in advertising today. Many similar commercials are banned in today’s world, and rightfully so.

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David
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

"If he keeps sniffing my neck maybe he won't notice that I only have three fingers" /S

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David
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

still one of my favorite candy bars TBH. I rarely eat candy any more but I like them. I am mildly curious about that red mystery center. Modern ones do not have that.

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Even though modern advertisements have come a long way, some old elements still work today, like having a spokesperson who is linked to the brand and attracts more customers.

Specifically, Ronald McDonald, Red and Yellow M&M's, and even Pillsbury Doughboy who become synonymous with their brands, proving this marketing tactic successful. Nowadays, influencers are the ones who promote businesses, and consumers love to hear what they have to say. Almost 50% of them search for videos before buying a product, and if a popular influencer is talking about it, this can increase profits.

Large and catchy slogans or headlines remain a great way to immediately draw people's attention. In 2009, boot company Timberland brought this back with the powerful headline “Walk the Talk”. The campaign demanded world leaders start putting their words into action to help stop climate change.

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Sand Ers
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I'd so go for that. Can't find birch beer anywhere now. I used to get it at Bev-Mo, but they dropped the product line.

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Wingsofwrath
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

It's weird how much time it takes to understand they're actually advertising the Dodge truck and not Pepsi...

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Tabitha
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3 months ago (edited) DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

This looks like an ad from the 1920s, when a boyish flat bustline was in style. If you look at the fashions for women during that time, you’ll see that they’re designed for slim hips and no bust, a very boyish figure. An hourglass shape totally ruins the line and makes you look a lot bigger than you actually are, and often you will look pregnant, because the cloth will hang from the outermost point. Though I know it was backlash to millennia of restrictive clothing, especially corsets and several pounds of petticoats and wool, the pendulum quite unfairly swung past the normal figure and instead went to the extreme that the vast majority of women are simply unable to achieve without developing an eating disorder. They say the road to ruin is always paved with good intentions. That’s because the good intentions are never completely well thought out.

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David
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I ate a lot of shredded wheat growing up. They are easier to eat if you crush the 'biscuits' and then tear open the packet and pour them into the bowl. As pictured looks nice for the ad but harder to eat that way.

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Interestingly, vintage magazine ad campaigns were meant to run only once, making them exceedingly rare and appealing to collectors. They now have rich historical and nostalgic value and have become tangible pieces of the past.

Today, vintage magazine ads are considered to be from before the 1800s to the 2010s, since that makes them over 20 years old. So, if you’re interested in starting, there’s still a great possibility that you’ll find something in such a wide time frame of newspaper and magazine production. 

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David Paterson
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Ovaltine. Yep, I remember ads like this. When it was just poor quality chocolate.

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Tabitha
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3 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Wow, talk about failing the test of time! How disrespectful and downright insulting can you get? If I’m not mistaken, that’s a war bonnet. They’re supposed to be used for specific sacred purposes only. They’re not for show, they’re not to be collected, and they’re definitely not to be used as costumes. (I welcome any Native Americans reading this to correct me if I’m wrong, and please tell me where I have erred. I want to get it right, because I definitely do not want to be disrespectful.)

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