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Woman Breaks Down 10 American And 10 French Things That Would Send Each Other Into A Coma
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Woman Breaks Down 10 American And 10 French Things That Would Send Each Other Into A Coma

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Cultural differences should be celebrated, not discriminated against. Every place is unique and valuable, and we can all learn from one another; by being open-minded and accepting instead of stubborn and arrogant, we can create a more inclusive global society.

TikTok user Roya (@royaventurera) is a great example of a conscious traveler. The woman fully immerses herself into the countries she goes to, and this allows her to experience them on a much deeper level than she would by just blindly following her foreign instincts.

Even better, Roya shares her insights online, so her followers can too broaden their understanding of the world. One particular destination that has received much of her attention is France. So without further ado, continue scrolling to see how it compares to the US.

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This traveler made a video on culture shocks that French people would experience in the United States

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Image credits: royaventurera

Image credits: Richard Ha

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And her video went viral

@royaventurera American things that would send a French person into a coma 🇺🇸 🇫🇷 #americaninfrance #french #france #usa #livingabroad #cultureshock ♬ original sound – Roya

So she put-together a follow-up video

Image credits: royaventurera

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Image credits: royaventurera

And it also blew up

@royaventurera Replying to @meemsology #greenscreen here are five more 😘 #cultureshock #usa #france #french #livingabroad #livingintheus #americaninfrance ♬ original sound – Roya

The popularity of Roya’s videos is a reminder that Americans are poised to travel overseas in a big way in 2023.

Households are continuing to unleash two or three years’ worth of pent-up demand as Covid fears wane and the last vestiges of pandemic-era border restrictions have eased.

The U.S. dollar remains relatively strong versus currencies like the euro, hybrid work yields more flexibility for big trips, and some airlines have added new long-haul routes to overseas destinations.

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“The travel industry is just going gangbusters,” Erin Florio, executive editor of Condé Nast Traveler, told CNBC.

In fact, 31 percent percent of Americans are more interested in international than domestic travel, a recent poll by tourism market research firm Destination Analysts has shown. (That’s a 6-point increase from February and a year-to-date high, according to the survey, published in November.)

So she decided to continue the series, just reverse the roles

Image credits: royaventurera

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This format also turned out to be a success

@royaventurera Replying to @hawkigirl96 here you go! French things that would send an American into a coma #americaninfrance #cultureshock #france #french #usa #livingabroad ♬ original sound – Roya

And quickly received a part-two

Image credits: royaventurera

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Image credits: statista

Image credits: royaventurera

The more you know!

@royaventurera Replying to @ledzeppelinsloot69 #greenscreen ask and you shall receive! Here are a few more 🫶 🇫🇷 🇺🇸 #americaninfrance #cultureshock #french #france #usa #livingabroad ♬ original sound – Roya

In reality, France is eagerly waiting for tourists from across the Atlantic. North America is projected to be the biggest contributor to the Parisian tourism market this year, with booking levels almost back to pre-pandemic 2019 levels.

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“The Americans are doing the job,” Frédéric Hocquard, Paris deputy mayor for tourism, told CNN. “Meaning that they are coming back en masse and with a lot of money to spend.”

Even outside of Paris, from north to south, tourist workers and government officials across France are chanting the same enthusiastic message — the Americans are back!

On average, American tourists, mostly visiting in groups, are each spending $402 (400 euros) per day in France, bringing the budget for a 10-day visit to a stunning $7,687, way ahead of any other foreign tourists.

The Americans are especially important this year for the south of France along the Mediterranean, whose beautiful coastlines have long been a paradise harboring many wealthy Russian vacationers.

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Here’s how people from all over the world reacted to Roya’s videos

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Greta Jaruševičiūtė

Greta Jaruševičiūtė

Author, BoredPanda staff

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Greta is a Photo Editor-in-Chief at Bored Panda with a BA in Communication.In 2016, she graduated from Digital Advertising courses where she had an opportunity to meet and learn from industry professionals. In the same year, she started working at Bored Panda as a photo editor.Greta is a coffeeholic and cannot survive a day without 5 cups of coffee... and her cute, big-eared dog.Her biggest open secret: she is a gamer with a giant gaming backlog.

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Greta Jaruševičiūtė

Greta Jaruševičiūtė

Author, BoredPanda staff

Greta is a Photo Editor-in-Chief at Bored Panda with a BA in Communication.In 2016, she graduated from Digital Advertising courses where she had an opportunity to meet and learn from industry professionals. In the same year, she started working at Bored Panda as a photo editor.Greta is a coffeeholic and cannot survive a day without 5 cups of coffee... and her cute, big-eared dog.Her biggest open secret: she is a gamer with a giant gaming backlog.

Rokas Laurinavičius

Rokas Laurinavičius

Writer, BoredPanda staff

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Rokas is a writer at Bored Panda with a BA in Communication. After working for a sculptor, he fell in love with visual storytelling and enjoys covering everything from TV shows (any Sopranos fans out there?) to photography. Throughout his years in Bored Panda, over 300 million people have read the posts he's written, which is probably more than he could count to.

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Rokas Laurinavičius

Rokas Laurinavičius

Writer, BoredPanda staff

Rokas is a writer at Bored Panda with a BA in Communication. After working for a sculptor, he fell in love with visual storytelling and enjoys covering everything from TV shows (any Sopranos fans out there?) to photography. Throughout his years in Bored Panda, over 300 million people have read the posts he's written, which is probably more than he could count to.

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rspanther avatar
rspanther
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I have no problem drinking coke with no ice, that way it doesn't get watered down.

lunashau avatar
Ash
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I think the reason Americans have enormous fridges is that we have pretty unwalkable cities. This means that going to the shop to get something to eat is not something you do every day or two, because it's a big process and a pain in the butt. So we generally go grocery shopping once a week instead. That means that you need to house at least a week's worth of food at a time instead of a day or two's worth. Ergo, bigger fridges and big freezers full of frozen food that will keep longer.

naesil avatar
Naesil 🇫🇮
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

That is probably big reason, also if we are not talking about tightly packed cities I would guess that on average your houses and apartments are bigger so fitting larger appliances is easier.

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alexs_1 avatar
Alex S
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

As someone married to a Frenchman, this sounds like she lived in Paris and based all her knowledge about France on that. That's like living in NY and saying this is what America is like. The one thing I've learned it's that nothing brings French people together like hating on Paris. There is plenty of spicy of food in France, the Basque region on the border of Spain is famous for a chili that grows there and nowhere else. Literally just google Basque French food. It's the opposite to stereotypical French food. France had so many regions with so many different dishes, it's just ignorant to pretend what you get at some French restaurant in the US is what French people actually eat. I'm Australian and running water while you wash dishes or brush your teeth is a huge no no due to drought. Saving water and electricity is fairly normal in most of the world where you have to be conscious of the resources you're using.

chelit26 avatar
PissedOffProfessor
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

My family had to do all sorts of water conservation here in the US. We lived in a rural area where there was no "city" water so we had a well--a well that seemed to always be in danger or going dry.

Load More Replies...
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rspanther avatar
rspanther
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I have no problem drinking coke with no ice, that way it doesn't get watered down.

lunashau avatar
Ash
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I think the reason Americans have enormous fridges is that we have pretty unwalkable cities. This means that going to the shop to get something to eat is not something you do every day or two, because it's a big process and a pain in the butt. So we generally go grocery shopping once a week instead. That means that you need to house at least a week's worth of food at a time instead of a day or two's worth. Ergo, bigger fridges and big freezers full of frozen food that will keep longer.

naesil avatar
Naesil 🇫🇮
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

That is probably big reason, also if we are not talking about tightly packed cities I would guess that on average your houses and apartments are bigger so fitting larger appliances is easier.

Load More Replies...
alexs_1 avatar
Alex S
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

As someone married to a Frenchman, this sounds like she lived in Paris and based all her knowledge about France on that. That's like living in NY and saying this is what America is like. The one thing I've learned it's that nothing brings French people together like hating on Paris. There is plenty of spicy of food in France, the Basque region on the border of Spain is famous for a chili that grows there and nowhere else. Literally just google Basque French food. It's the opposite to stereotypical French food. France had so many regions with so many different dishes, it's just ignorant to pretend what you get at some French restaurant in the US is what French people actually eat. I'm Australian and running water while you wash dishes or brush your teeth is a huge no no due to drought. Saving water and electricity is fairly normal in most of the world where you have to be conscious of the resources you're using.

chelit26 avatar
PissedOffProfessor
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

My family had to do all sorts of water conservation here in the US. We lived in a rural area where there was no "city" water so we had a well--a well that seemed to always be in danger or going dry.

Load More Replies...
Load More Comments
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