Ever wondered what the last artworks of some of history's greatest artists looked like? Well if so then you're in luck because we've collected thirty seven final masterpieces from some of the world's most well-known artists. Compiled by Bored Panda, the list includes work from contemporary artists like Picasso and Matisse to classical masters including Caravaggio and Rafael. Scroll down to find your favorite artist, and don't forget to vote.

#1 Claude Monet: Water Lilies Murals (1926)

Claude Monet: Water Lilies Murals (1926)

The Grandes Décorations (1920/26) are a collection or murals that comprise Claude Monet's last works. They depict his beloved water lilies and he painted them when both his eyesight and health were failing. As his sight worsened due to cataracts, his works turned from fresh, bright colours to blurred visions of heavy browns and reds. He wrote letters to friends, how colors were getting dull, and it was hard to tell them apart, and how he had to label tubes of paint. Monet specified that when he died he wanted to be buried like "a local man," adding "“Above all, remember I want neither flowers nor wreaths. Those are vain honors. It would be a... Read More

The Grandes Décorations (1920/26) are a collection or murals that comprise Claude Monet's last works. They depict his beloved water lilies and he painted them when both his eyesight and health were failing. As his sight worsened due to cataracts, his works turned from fresh, bright colours to blurred visions of heavy browns and reds. He wrote letters to friends, how colors were getting dull, and it was hard to tell them apart, and how he had to label tubes of paint. Monet specified that when he died he wanted to be buried like "a local man," adding "“Above all, remember I want neither flowers nor wreaths. Those are vain honors. It would be a sacrilege to plunder the flowers of my garden for an occasion such as this.” (source: monetartprints, livescience)

intermonet.com Report

Yvonne Bernal 9 months ago

Monet had cataracts. The oranges and blues of his paintings become almost indistinguishable. His vision got cloudy late in life, and his whole world blurred like, well, like a Monet. He wrote letters to friends, how colors were getting dull, and it was hard to tell them apart, and how he had to label tubes of paint,

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#2 Keith Haring: Unfinished Painting (1990)

Keith Haring: Unfinished Painting (1990)

Keith Allen Haring was an American artist and social activist whose work expressed concepts of birth, death, sexuality, and war. His work was often political, and his style is highly distinctive. One of his last works was finished shortly before the artist died from AIDS-related complications in 1990. The painting serves as a poignant statement about a life cut short at the age of thirty-one. (source: es.npg.si.edu)

smithsonianmag.com , National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution Report

Sophie G 9 months ago

ouch

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#3 Pablo Picasso's Last Self-Portrait (1972)

Pablo Picasso's Last Self-Portrait (1972)

Picasso's last well-known self portrait is called, somewhat aptly, Self Portrait Facing Death. He drew it with crayon on paper in 1972, less than a year before his death. Picasso worked right up until the day he died, aged 91, painting until 3am on Sunday, April 8th, just hours before he passed away. (source: arts.pallimed.org)

arthistoryarchive.com Report

Yvonne Bernal 9 months ago

A friend of Picasso's , Pierre Daix,said on a visit to Picasso, "Picasso held the drawing beside his face to show that the expression of fear was a contrivance." Then on another visit 3 months later, Pierre recalled that the harsh colored lines were even deeper, and Pierre writes, "He did not blink. I had the sudden impression that he was staring his own death in the face"

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#4 Vincent Van Gogh: Tree Roots (1890)

Vincent Van Gogh: Tree Roots (1890)

Wheatfield With Crows (1890) is often considered to be Vincent van Gogh's last work, perhaps because the ominous setting was in fact the place he chose in real life for his final, successful suicide attempt. It is however more likely that his final work was Tree Roots, painted in Auvers-sur-Oise, France, shortly after he left an asylum in Saint-Rémy. (source: vangoghmuseum.nl)

commons.wikimedia.org Report

Yvonne Bernal 9 months ago

Interesting to note that Van Gogh had already made several drawings of tree roots in The Hague almost ten years earlier. At that time he stated of his wish ‘to express something of his life’s struggle in those gnarled black roots’. The same symbolism is seen in these twisted tree roots, painted eight years later.

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#5 Jean-Michel Basquiat: Riding With Death (1988)

Jean-Michel Basquiat: Riding With Death (1988)

Whether or not Riding With Death (1988) is Jean-Michel Basquiat’s final painting is still up for debate. The work certainly has a morbid quality about it that evokes a sense of an ending, and Basquiat painted it shortly before his own death from a heroin overdose in 1988. (source: Jean-Michel Basquiat: 1960-1988)

wikiart.org Report

varwenea 9 months ago

I think he looks rather badass, riding on the back of death in complete control and ready for his next journey. I can only hope for such strength at the doorstep of death.

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#6 Salvador Dali: The Swallow's Tail (1983)

Salvador Dali: The Swallow's Tail (1983)

Salvador Dali completed his last painting in the spring of 1983. The work is titled Swallows Tail and is the last in a series of paintings he did based on Catastrophe Theory, originated by the French mathematician Rene Thom in the 1960s. Catastrophe theory is a brand of mathematics that studies how small changes in circumstances can lead to sudden shifts in behavior. The painting was Dali's attempt to represent his understanding of this mathematical theory. Salvador Dali died in 1989, aged 84. (source: wikiart.org)

wikipedia.org Report

Sara 9 months ago

signature

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#7 Frida Kahlo: Viva La Vida, Watermelons (1954)

Frida Kahlo: Viva La Vida, Watermelons (1954)

VIVA LA VIDA is Mexican artist Frida Kahlo's last work. She completed it eight days before she died on July 13, 1954, aged 47. The painting is a still life with watermelons, a fruit that is a popular symbol in the Mexican day of the dead (Dia de los Muertos). Watermelons are also a frequent feature in Mexican art. Viva La Vida means "long live life" in Spanish. (source: artanddesigninspiration.com)

fridakahlofans.com Report

Luca Plas 9 months ago

Shame on myself for not knowing this! I have a growing obsession with Frida Kahlo and I had never before seen this painting!

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#8 Edouard Manet: A Bar At The Folies-Bergère (1882)

Edouard Manet: A Bar At The Folies-Bergère (1882)

Édouard Manet (1832 – 1883) was a French painter. He was one of the first 19th-century artists to paint modern life, and a central figure in the transition from Realism to Impressionism. His last painting was A Bar at the Folies-Bergère (Un bar aux Folies Bergère), which was completed in 1882, just a year before he died after having his foot amputated due to gangrene. It originally belonged to the composer Emmanuel Chabrier, who was Manet's neighbor, and hung over his piano. (source: wikipedia.org)

commons.wikimedia.org Report

Herb Eaversmells 9 months ago

My favorite painting of all time

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#9 Gustav Klimt: The Bride (1918)

Gustav Klimt: The Bride (1918)

Gustav Klimt never finished his last painting, titled The Bride (1917/1918), but this uncompleted work gives us a fascinating insight into the artist's technique as well as his inner desires. The painting depicts naked women, because Klimt died before he could dress them, but the fact that he first painted his subjects naked before dressing them in clothes reveals the sexual obsession that lay beneath the surface of Klimt's works. (source: gustav-klimt.com)

gustav-klimt.com Report

varwenea 9 months ago

It is beautiful! The curvy backside is particularly striking.

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#10 Francis Bacon: Study Of A Bull (1991)

Francis Bacon: Study Of A Bull (1991)

Study of a Bull was completed in 1991 just months before the artist, Francis Bacon, died as a result of chronic asthma. Having spent its life in a very private collection in London, the painting has never been seen publicly. It was discovered when an art historian named Martin Harrison was researching Bacon's work for the publication of the Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné. Harrison maintains that Bacon knew that he was close to death when he was working on this particular piece. “Bacon is ready to sign off … he was so ill… He knew exactly what he was doing here," he said. (source: francis-bacon.com)

The Estate of Francis Bacon Report

varwenea 9 months ago

Bacon should have painted a pig. Tehe.

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