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Women Are Sharing The Most Ridiculous Things About Periods And Sex That They Learned Due To Poor Sex-Ed
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People, Social Issues2 years ago

Women Are Sharing The Most Ridiculous Things About Periods And Sex That They Learned Due To Poor Sex-Ed

We’ve all experienced a sex education class at school. It probably came with the whole teen angst package—rolling eyes, blushing, and quiet cringes. Silence pierced the classroom when the teacher asked if anyone had questions. Around this time, many of us realized that periods are real, and there’s no black magic. Life went on and it was ready to give us yet another pubescent surprise.

It turns out this wasn’t the case for Julie Mannell, a young woman who grew up in Ontario Catholic School in the 90s. “I thought women had their periods forever.” So, when her period stopped for a brief moment, it all came down on her. Julie was convinced she got pregnant after petting a neighbor’s dog. Tune in for the hard-to-believe story below and share your opinions about the subject matter in the comments.

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Julie Mannell, an author of fiction, turned to Twitter to share the episode from her pubescent years

Image credits: JulieMannell

Image credits: JulieMannell

Image credits: JulieMannell

Women got on board to share the period myths they used to believe

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Image credits: NikolHasler

Image credits: JulieMannell

Image credits: foolerrant

Julie was not the only ‘success story’ from Catholic school sex education classes

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Image credits: NikolHasler

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Daria B
Community Member
2 years ago (edited)

My conclusion after reading all these: wow, I certainly grew up in a rational open minded society. I grew up with 3 sisters and nothing was a mystical secret regarding female's health. My mother wasn't shy about it either, and at school, we learned about it during biology classes as the most normal thing. So, I never understood the ignorance any time I'd encounter it in a, for example, magazine for teens, in the letters from the audience section. I thought those were some kind of jokes, I never believed someone would really think such nonsense. Now I know I was a lucky one.

chi-wei shen
Community Member
2 years ago

When I grew up in the 1970s in Austria we learned about it in school and a lot from a widely distributed German magazine for teenagers (I think it was a weekly magazine). Twelve-year-old I knew pretty much all technical details and the boys and girls I went to school with were on my level, even though different parents used very different ways to approach this topic and some parents didn't approach it at all. Stories like the above were simply unthinkable.

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Random Panda
Community Member
2 years ago

All of this is so dystopian to me. We learned all about the reproductive system, sex and everything related during biology class. By that time I and most of my classmates knew the basics of it, usually learned from our parents. I don't remember the conversation, but I do remember it was my dad who told me about periods instead of my mom. The two of us were watching a historical drama, I asked a dumb question and my dad was like "well, actually....". I was about 10 maybe. But no one really spoke about such things to my little brother, so when I got my period the same night he privately asked me, absolutely terrified, if he was going to bleed too. The poor thing, I laughed so much.

Laugh or not
Community Member
2 years ago

I would laugh, if I weren't so angry at a society that mis-educates (I don't care if it's not a word, it should be) and alienate our own bodies from us. People die from such ignorance. When I had my first period, I knew what it was, I knew what to so - kind of, turns out there are pads and panty liners,- when my parents came in the evening, I just told them I had my period. No drama, no panic.

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Daria B
Community Member
2 years ago (edited)

My conclusion after reading all these: wow, I certainly grew up in a rational open minded society. I grew up with 3 sisters and nothing was a mystical secret regarding female's health. My mother wasn't shy about it either, and at school, we learned about it during biology classes as the most normal thing. So, I never understood the ignorance any time I'd encounter it in a, for example, magazine for teens, in the letters from the audience section. I thought those were some kind of jokes, I never believed someone would really think such nonsense. Now I know I was a lucky one.

chi-wei shen
Community Member
2 years ago

When I grew up in the 1970s in Austria we learned about it in school and a lot from a widely distributed German magazine for teenagers (I think it was a weekly magazine). Twelve-year-old I knew pretty much all technical details and the boys and girls I went to school with were on my level, even though different parents used very different ways to approach this topic and some parents didn't approach it at all. Stories like the above were simply unthinkable.

Load More Replies...
Random Panda
Community Member
2 years ago

All of this is so dystopian to me. We learned all about the reproductive system, sex and everything related during biology class. By that time I and most of my classmates knew the basics of it, usually learned from our parents. I don't remember the conversation, but I do remember it was my dad who told me about periods instead of my mom. The two of us were watching a historical drama, I asked a dumb question and my dad was like "well, actually....". I was about 10 maybe. But no one really spoke about such things to my little brother, so when I got my period the same night he privately asked me, absolutely terrified, if he was going to bleed too. The poor thing, I laughed so much.

Laugh or not
Community Member
2 years ago

I would laugh, if I weren't so angry at a society that mis-educates (I don't care if it's not a word, it should be) and alienate our own bodies from us. People die from such ignorance. When I had my first period, I knew what it was, I knew what to so - kind of, turns out there are pads and panty liners,- when my parents came in the evening, I just told them I had my period. No drama, no panic.

Load More Comments
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