You probably have heard a lot of things about a country in northern Europe, Norway, and its a little over 5million inhabitants, but learning something new never hurts! We here at Bored Panda gathered some interesting facts about Norway, that you probably didn't know yet, well unless you're from Norwegian yourself. And if you are, don't forget to share some more interesting facts about your country in the comments.

#1

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

It is common for members of royal families to be required to only marry people of royal descent. However, King Harald of Norway vowed to never marry at all, if he wasn’t allowed to marry the love of his life, the daughter of a cloth merchant, Sonja Haraldsen. They later married with help of the Government of Norway and she became the Queen of Norway.

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SupriyaG
Community Member
1 year ago

Hats off to the government.

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#2

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

There's a king penguin, named Nils Olav residing in Edinburgh's Zoo who was presented the title of Colonel-in-Chief of the Norwegian King's Guard by the king of Norway.

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BeenElle
Community Member
1 year ago

Fantastic photo! It looks like he is inspecting the soldiers all lined up so neatly.

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#3

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

The world's most expensive gas is found in Norway. Norwegians pay $7.82 for a gallon of gas. In comparison, US citizens pay around $2.99. Norway has significant oil reserves but instead of subsidizing vehicle fuel, the country uses the money elsewhere. For example, to fund free college for its residents.

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Tiari
Community Member
1 year ago

And just for every non-American: The average price since October is 1,66€ per liter super. Not THAT high imo.

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#4

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

During the oil crisis in 1973, Norway's King Olav had no problem taking public transport to a ski resort on the car-free weekend and even paid for a ticket. Back then car-free weekends were introduced by the Norwegian government in an effort to make people save gas.

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SupriyaG
Community Member
1 year ago

Humble King

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#5

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

Every year since 1947 Norway's capital city Oslo, has donated a Christmas tree to the people of Britain as a token of gratitude for British support to Norway during the Second World War. The tree is prominently displayed in Trafalgar Square.

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Yvonne Bernal
Community Member
1 year ago

I wish more countries (and people) could just get along.

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#6

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

While sushi was invented by the Japanese, we only have salmon sushi thanks to Norwegians. In 1980, during an attempt to expand seafood exports, the Norwegian delegation suggested Japanese use salmon in preparing sushi. While it took some time for them to get used to eating raw salmon, the idea eventually stuck and turned into a popular sushi variation.

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Yvonne Bernal
Community Member
1 year ago

I LOVE sushi, all sushi. But every time I eat salmon sushi I will be reminded of this post. ~ Thank you Norway!!

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#7

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

Norwegians are among the happiest nations in the world. In 2017 Norway took first place in World Happiness report and the second place in 2018.

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Alexandru Bucur
Community Member
1 year ago

Well, technically, there are a few countries that are so close on the World Happiness Index that they keep shuffling among themselves each year - Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Switzerland, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Australia and Canada...

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#8

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

It's common for Norwegians to leave their babies sleeping outside even if temperatures are as low as 23F (-5C). Parents often leave sleeping children in prams outside cafes as they drink coffee, or balconies because they believe that it's much healthier for them to sleep in the fresh air.

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JillVille
Community Member
1 year ago

I appreciate the fresh air idea - and clearly there is confidence in knowing their babies stay safe while waiting. I couldn't imagine doing that here - in Canada even, it would be nerve wracking.

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#9

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

Norway may not have a lot of luck in the summer Olympics, but they definitely rock the winter games. They have the most winter Olympic medals, 329 to be exact.

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Wynand
Community Member
1 year ago

What a curious fact. Almost as weird as, say, Jamaica, not faring so well at the Winter Olympics. Now, if only they'd enter a bobsleigh team and confuse the heck out of everyone...

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#10

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

In Norway, you can get a harsher penalty for speeding than, for getting caught with drugs. Norway is probably the only European country where you can go to jail for speeding. 150km/h on a motor road can land you in jail for 18 days.

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Nikki D
Community Member
1 year ago

Well, speeding probably puts more people at risk of harm than someone being on drugs.

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#11

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

It is forbidden to die in the small town of Longyearbyen. The town hasn't buried any dead people for 80 years, because bodies can’t decompose in the permafrost. Terminally ill people are flown out of the town to die elsewhere.

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Jill Pulcifer
Community Member
1 year ago

Seems like it would be easier for all involved if they just cremated them.

frugtug
Community Member
1 year ago

The issue is not with the recently deceased, but there is a reasonable fear of disturbing the ground of the local cemetery - as the bodies of those who had died as a result of the 1918 flu pandemic had not begun to decompose. The preserved corpses may still contain live strains of that same virus that killed 5% of the world's population in the 20th century.

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Night Owl
Community Member
1 year ago

Wouldn't it be more human and easier to let them die in their homes (or close to home like in the towns hospital) and then fly the bodies out?

AD
Community Member
1 year ago

Calm down everyone. Longyearbyen is a city on Svalbard in the Arctic and most of the people that live there moved there for research purposes or a specifik task. Nobody is born there, pregnant women also fly to hospitals to give birth because the city can't provide sufficient care. If you get seriously ill, you'll get transported to a hospital. You get well or you die there. Longyearbyen is not usually a place people would spend their whole life at, there's pretty much no sun for six months and it doesnt go down for the other six.

Frozengeckolover
Community Member
1 year ago (edited)

There is pretty much no sun for six months and then it doesn't go down for the other six in Fairbanks, Alaska, but people live (and die) there. There is also perma-frost in Fairbanks, but people can be buried there. Spring time was always fun. Once the snow melted, we'd start finding frozen corpses of drunks who didn't make it home from the bar.

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Wynand
Community Member
1 year ago

Forbidden to die or forbidden to be buried? Because if it's forbidden to die and you slip in a fjord and bump your toe and get partially eaten by a polar bear until you're dead, then you might face some severe fines.

SexyEggPlant
Community Member
1 year ago

This is actually messed up like if you want to fly out a dead body fine but like not a terminally ill person! Like let them die with their loved ones not in some strange foreign place possibly alone! or you could cremate them! Fuck pollution a couple bodies floating around won't do shit

diane a
Community Member
1 year ago (edited)

How do they even do it - do they forcibly stretcher these poor terminally ill people kicking and screaming out of their homes and onto a plane??

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diane a
Community Member
1 year ago (edited)

How sad - can they not let them die at home first? If it is that cold, an extra day in storage for a body wont make a difference.

Christian
Community Member
1 year ago

Its not really their home. Nobody comes from Svalbard ;)

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2-10-11
Community Member
1 year ago

Bring out your dead! Or nearly dead.....

KT Trondsen
Community Member
1 year ago

wow.....that's a bit harsh. Why not let someone die in their own home, then fly the body out after?

FortnitePlayerGirl
Community Member
1 year ago

that's strange

Christian
Community Member
1 year ago

This is Svalbard with a society based on mining, with some arctic education and studies, as well as recently more tourism thrown into the mix. It is basically the frontier. You can't be unemployed or without means to support yourself there, also pregnant woman have to travel to the mainland in advance of giving birth as there are no facilities for this. Fun fact, just 2 months ago some jackass tried to rod the bank there on gunpoint. He as apprehended pretty fast, as there is no where to flee. He was not a Norwegian btw.. Armed robberies are very rare in Norway in general, really rare. And Svalbard is the dumbest place to try that as it is an island way up in the arctic circle, and the only place where most of the people have access to a rifle. In fact, you are advised to carry one when venturing outside of town due to the polar bears.

Kenny Kulbiski
Community Member
1 year ago

Jeez, talk about your airplane from hell!

Beeps
Community Member
1 year ago

This was a plot point in the TV series ‘Fortitude’ but I thought they had made up that concept. :(

Isog Sargent
Community Member
1 year ago

Just put them out on the ice and let the polar bears have them.

C
Community Member
1 year ago

This is inhumane. Cremate then if it's an issue

Wanda Queen
Community Member
1 year ago

That seems cruel.

tuzdayschild
Community Member
1 year ago (edited)

Why exactly is the inability to decompose a problem? Is it a heeby jeeby thing? Dead people shouldn't look like living people thing? If you bury them, what does it matter whether of not they decompose?

Sean Forrester
Community Member
1 year ago

It depends on what they die from. Lets say you die from chickenpox and they bury you in the cold ground. Your body cannot decompose properly. Lets then say that after 70 years after your burial, chickenpox has been eradicated from society. Then comes something along the lines of Global Warming and your burial site warms up and melts. Your frozen body now thaws and all the shit you had wrong with you is still active. Its happening now with discoveries of corpses with the plague still active since the dark ages found in now thawed environments.

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frugtug
Community Member
1 year ago

This is false. It is not illegal to die there, there are just no options for burial.

ADHORTATOR
Community Member
1 year ago

"So you surely fly me out of town so that I can get a better treatment elsewhere?" ".....not really..."

Banna Annano
Community Member
1 year ago

Calm down

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#12

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

Since 1901 the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony has been held in Oslo, Norway.

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Kim Lorton
Community Member
1 year ago

I also got to meet King Karl and shake his hand as the only exchange student in Almhult that year

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#13

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

Norway is one of the world's biggest consumers of coffee. Annually, Norwegians consume 9.9 kg coffee per person.

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Katri
Community Member
1 year ago

Finland consumes the most coffee in the world

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#14

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

Furniture retailer Ikea names its beds, wardrobes and hall furniture with the names of places in Norway.

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Oathbraker
Community Member
1 year ago

There was a funny test where you had to figure if a word was the name of an Ikea item or a metal band. http://ikeaordeath.com/

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#15

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

Famous Voss bottled water comes from the municipal water supply in Iveland, Norway.

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Nubmaeme
Community Member
1 year ago

Nearly all bottled waters on the market come from municipal water supplies, even those advertised as from natural springs. Caveat emptor!

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#16

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

Norway's supermarkets only sell beer and cider. To get any other alcoholic beverage you have to visit a specialized store called a Vinmonopolet. While major cities in Norway have several of these stores, you can only find one in smaller towns, and none in the countryside.

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Wynand
Community Member
1 year ago

Vinmonopolet, as in wine monopoly? The game I never knew I needed.

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#17

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

In 1971 Norway abolished life imprisonment. Now the longest possible term in jail they have is 21 years.

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Misterscooter
Community Member
1 year ago

If it is effective, why not?

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#18

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

Norway's unofficial national dish - Gransiosa frozen pizza. Apparently, Norwegians are huge fans of frozen pizza, they consume around 24 million pans each year.

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Kururi.Orihara
Community Member
1 year ago

Ah ha! Take that, American stereotypes!!

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#19

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

It probably comes as no surprise that modern skiing was invented by a Norwegian. During the late 19th century Sondre Norheim created a ski design that allowed him to swing and jump with a lower risk of falling. His design inspired the modern skis we use today.

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Kururi.Orihara
Community Member
1 year ago

Actually Ullr did.

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#20

Interesting-Facts-About-Norway

Every Norwegian who owns a TV set has to pay a TV license fee of 2680,56 kr ($318) each year.

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Lit
Community Member
1 year ago

Same thing in the UK

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