It’s crazy how little we know about our bodies. We tend to think that sugar makes us gain weight, that sports are done better on an empty stomach, and anything bio and eco is immediately healthier.

But what if we told you it was all wrong? Well, Leah Forristall, a sustainable weight loss and outdoor sports dietician, has been debunking such myths in a series of light-hearted videos on her TikTok channel.

Titled “Hard Truths From A Dietician,” Leah’s videos reveal a refreshing look on diet, food and healthy eating and challenge the ways people view them. Scroll down to find her hard truths below and be sure to share what you think in the comments!

#2

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Delboy
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

This is probably one of the most important things she said!

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Bored Panda reached out to Leah Forristall, a content creator and registered dietician located in Massachusetts who has been making viral “Hard Truths” TikTok videos about nutrition. Leah told us that in her practice, she helps people reach their weight loss and fitness goals sustainably.

“I grew up dancing, which ultimately led to my interest in food and how it impacts performance. After 21 years, I decided to hang up my pointe shoes and focus on my passion for outdoor sports (specifically hiking),” she said and added: “Now I get to help other people fuel properly, whether their goal is to win an ultramarathon or simply lose 10 pounds while keeping the weight off.”

#3

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Louloubelle
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I have a sister that yo-yo diets. Her desire to be thin outweighs everything. Thus she loses 100 lbs. Then gains 110. Loses 50, gains 75. I'm no expert, but this seems to unhealthy. And she clearly has issues with food.

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#4

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Gabby M
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Trader Joe's & Aldi ..... owned by the same family. But it goes beyond that.

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“There are a lot of misconceptions about nutrition. Food is personal, everybody needs to eat.” Leah said. When asked to share the most common one, the nutritionist said that it’s a misconception that “nutrition is black and white.”

“There is actually a lot of gray area, which is expected as everybody has their own unique, individualized needs. People tend to focus on the extremes instead of finding a healthy balance,” she explained.

#5

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Michael Beswick
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

You need the right amount of calories for your size and metabolic activity

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#6

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Q B F T
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Isn't not liking vegetables something that you grow out of after, at the latest, your teens? Do that many adults really have the palate of a 7 year old? What do they even eat, if so?

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“If I had one key nutrition tip for anyone looking to make healthy lifestyle changes, it would be to ask yourself this one question: ‘can I see myself in 10 years doing the exact same thing I'm doing now?’ If you don't enjoy what you're doing now, whether that be a specific workout routine or diet, you can't expect long-term results from it.”

#8

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Adam C
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

A guy from office have been eat oatmeal for breakfast for 17 years. Every day.

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When asked what her day looks like as a registered dietitian and nutrition coach, Leah said that every day looks a little different. “I'm a dietitian at a local university and see private practice clients during the evenings. Weekends I get to spend outdoors with the occasional workshop or nutrition event thrown into the mix!”

#9

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Troux
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I've never heard of someone blaming their weight gain on fruit, but it's only come out in the past few years that doctors are advising against too much fruit juice, as the sugar content is more concentrated and fiber is extremely low, compared to just eating the fruit.

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#10

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S.
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

How slim...? I just looked up the article on Healthline and here's a passage: ""Research suggests that regularly eating whole grains, like brown rice, helps lower blood sugar levels and decreases the risk of type 2 diabetes. Even just replacing white rice with brown has been shown to lower blood sugar levels and decrease type 2 diabetes risk. On the other hand, eating lots of white rice has been linked to an increased risk of diabetes."" Plus they linked additional sources for each claim. ( https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/brown-vs-white-rice#brown-rice )

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It’s no secret that the nutrition industry is currently experiencing unprecedented growth. Increased awareness of how diet affects health and the benefits of healthy eating habits means consumers are more educated than ever.

The Food And Drug Administration has recently released the results of its latest Safety and Nutrition Survey (FSANS) that incorporated 4,400 responses. The key findings showed that most consumers are familiar with the Nutrition Facts label. In fact, 87% of respondents have looked at the Nutrition Facts label on food packages, which indicated that people are getting more conscious about their food choices. The top four items that consumers look for on the label are: calories, total sugar, sodium, and serving size.

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#12

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Jayne Kyra
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I refuse to accept this! (written while on my second large mug of black goodness)

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Moreover, another finding also confirmed that consumers have knowledge of the front packages of the food products they buy in supermarkets. “Over 80% of respondents have seen claims such as, 'No added sugar,' 'Whole grain,' 'Organic,' 'Gluten-free,' 'Low fat,' 'No artificial ingredients,' 'Low sugar,' and 'No artificial colors,'” states the survey’s findings.

#13

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Troux
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

A diet can also be a lifestyle change. I've known plenty of people who regularly fold in IF periods into their month when they are adjusting or realigning to their target weight. Being able to do this effectively requires discipline and a healthy approach which is a lifestyle. Acting careers that require weight swings are based on this same principle.

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But just like with any booming industry (think of beauty and fashion), the nutrition industry has its own trends that come and go. You probably remember the kale craze that was everywhere not so long ago. Now, in the post-pandemic world, the experts notice new emerging nutrition trends tipped to take off in 2022. This new report from Sainsbury’s Future Brands team and global agency The Food People shows a lot of interesting things about that.

“Beauty and skincare are big business, and consumers have long sought out the secret to looking younger through moisturizers and serums, but it’s now thought the ‘fountain of youth’ can be better absorbed through food and drink,” the Sainsbury’s Future Brands representative Ella Stockton explained to Bored Panda.

“Both collagen and hyaluronic acid are expected to join ingredient lists of staple supermarket products.” Edibles follow the already popular superfood trends where people aim to maximize their nutrition through foods that are rich in nutrients.

#15

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Sill Marien
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

It is for me - my body produces amount that would satisfy a couple other human beings ;)

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Other trends include eating sea crops that are hailed as the latest healthy food trend, clean label consumerism where people actively avoid artificial ingredients, the popularity of pre-biotics and post-biotics, nutrition-dense food and drink, and consuming various seeds.

#17

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Hannah Edwards
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Some of them give me gas, acid reflux and, on a really bad day, diarrhoea. So I steer clear altogether.

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Shokofeh Hejazi, a senior editor at The Food People, commented: “Consumers are more focused than ever on improving their health and wellbeing and they’re looking to what they eat and drink for solutions to help on that journey. This has led to a surge in functional foods that aim to improve immunity, gut health, energy levels and skin quality.”

Moreover, Hejazi said that consumers are generally more curious and knowledgeable than ever. “It means they are not just thinking about how something tastes, but querying what’s in it, how it’s made and whether it’s healthy.” She added that it’s “amazing to see how much these mindsets have changed in just the space of a year and a half, and where it may be heading in the future.”

#18

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Valisbourne Spiritforge
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

The problem with sugar in America is, it's in virtually everything already. "Added" sugar may not be bad, but if you are tossing sugar on top of your Capt Crunch cereal, you may have an issue.

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#19

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Valisbourne Spiritforge
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Neither is salt. But both are acquired tastes and take time to change (we dropped salt and it took 6 months or more before everything stopped tasting like cardboard).

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