The things that we use in everyday life have become such intrinsic parts of our routine that we stopped wondering why they are the way that they are a long time ago. Sometimes even without fully understanding them. So, Bored Panda took a closer look at some of the most common items to show just how much thought was put into designing them. Hopefully, this will allow you to unlock their full potential!

#1

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The pom-poms on beanies and other hats. They might look cute and fluffy now but they had an actual function before. French sailors used to wear hats with pom-poms so that they wouldn't hurt their heads on the ceilings of the ship during rough weather.

randomlies Report

Colin L
Community Member
3 months ago

Head bumpers!

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#2

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Notebook margins. Remember the horror of realizing that “college ruled” notebook paper meant slimmer margins, and therefore left room for more writing? Well, believe it or not, those margins weren’t invented as a guide for how many sentences you could fit onto one page, or even to leave space for note-taking. Manufacturers began to apply margins to writing paper for the purpose of protecting your work. Earlier on in history, rats were a common resident in many people’s homes, and one of their favorite snacks was your paper, in addition to everything else they could munch on. Applying wide margins to paper safeguarded against losing important work by leaving blank spaces around the edges for the rats to chew through first, and to protect the writing on the outer edges from general wear and tear.

Jason Staten Report

Alyssa Fry
Community Member
3 months ago

Wow!

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#3

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose A lot of doorknobs are made out of brass because it destroys bacteria. So, these types of doorknobs are essentially germ-proof. Perfect in a household with lots of kids.

Alan Levine Report

Tiari
Community Member
3 months ago (edited)

Plus a fun fact: door knobs do not exist is many parts of the world ;)

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#4

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The half-belt on coats and jackets. Nowadays, half-belts are added to clothes mostly for the sake of style. However, they were originally used on oversized military jackets that doubled as blankets to gather up all the extra material so that soldiers could walk without stumbling.

Fuchsia Report

Scagsy
Community Member
3 months ago

Half-belts; forged in war

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#5

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose You can use your screwdrivers as wrenches as well. A lot of screwdrivers can be easily slid through a wrench and are used to create more torque. This feature is especially helpful at complicated heights and angles.

thetortureneverstops Report

ebony1k124 touch
Community Member
3 months ago

Good to know.

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#6

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The fabric swatch. If you're curious about the world of fashion like we are, then you've probably wondered about those tiny squares of fabric with buttons in small Ziploc bags that come with new clothes. Sure, you can use the button to replace a missing one and you can use the piece of fabric to patch up a hole. But the main purpose of the fabric swatch is for you to test out different cleaning products on it so you won't ruin your clothes.

RJ News Report

Lola
Community Member
3 months ago (edited)

I’ve been buying clothes for a very long time and I have not gotten that little piece of fabric. I’ve gotten many buttons though.

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#7

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The ridges on the edges of some coins. Ridge patterns on coins are a relic of the past when precious metal coins would be as valuable as their weight. However, some sneaky rogues would shave off the edges of coins and use that metal to mint new coins while spending the shaved coins as if they didn't weigh less. The ridges were added so it would be obvious when somebody had shaved off parts of a coin and was trying to cheat the system.

Branko Collin Report

varwenea
Community Member
3 months ago

In some countries, they purposely design in different edges so blind people can tell which coin is what.

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#8

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The tiny buttons on your jeans. These buttons are known as rivets and they're the silent heroes that make your pants last longer. They're placed in the areas that are most likely to tear from movement or strain and help hold the fabric together.

rohit gowaikar Report

Stannous Flouride
Community Member
3 months ago

Developed by Levi Strauss in 1873 San Francisco who took blue denim and made them into work pants. At the time most men's trousers were what we might think of as slacks today. The fabric was so thick that the sewing machines of the day couldn't make strong enough connections at the stress points so he started using copper rivets. The crotch, where four pieces of fabric are joined originally had a rivet and he pooh-poohed complaints about it until (reportedly) he was sitting at a campfire with his legs apart and quite painfully learned first-hand how well copper conducts heat.

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#9

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The little arrow-like symbol on a dashboard. It’s not only you who, upon arrival at a gas station, has had to work hard at remembering which side your gas tank is on. It turns out, the answer has been right in front of you.Every dashboard has a little symbol—an arrow or a triangle—placed near the gas gauge. It indicates precisely that which you forgot: which side your gas tank is on. If the arrow is pointing left, look for the filler cap there. If it is pointing right, you know what to do.

Tom Magliery Report

Colin L
Community Member
3 months ago

Not all vehicles have these!

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#10

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The extra eyelets on shoes. If you loop your laces through them, then you tighten the shoe around your ankle and prevent the shoe from moving around. This way you increase the stability of the shoe, decrease impact loading rates, and prevent your foot from moving about while climbing or descending hills and trails. It's great for jogging and hiking!

Kledd Report

ebony1k124 touch
Community Member
3 months ago

Definitely was not aware of this.

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#11

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The holes in pen caps. Some people can't help but chew the caps of their pens (tip: don't do this). However, it's a potential health hazard because you might swallow it and choke. The holes in the caps allow people to breathe in case that happens.

Trounce Report

Scagsy
Community Member
3 months ago

You can also use the plastic tube (emptied) for an emergency tracheotomy

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#12

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Remember that drawer under your oven? The one where you keep your kitchen gear that doesn't belong anywhere else? It wasn’t actually designed for that. Manufacturers originally made that drawer for keeping food warm until you were ready to serve it. Now tell us how many people do you know who actually do this.

osseous Report

wandile dludlu
Community Member
3 months ago

I knew this and we still kept baking pans in there

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#13

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The hole at the top of a lollipop stick. The Hole At The Top Of A Lollipop Stick. This weird little hole emerging after you finish a candy has been bugging us for years. Who would ever put a whistle there if it doesn't work?! It turns out, the reason for this lollipop stick hole has to do with manufacturing. When pouring hot, molten caramel into the mold, some of it seeps into this hole and hardens. It allows the candy to stay on the stick and not to fall off.

lily liu Report

Raine Soo
Community Member
3 months ago (edited)

This feature makes alot of sense.

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#14

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The small holes on locks. They help drain water from locks which stop it from rusting and clogging up with gunk. You can also use the hole to oil the lock's inner mechanism and keep it in tip-top shape.

Hannah Giggles Report

Raine Soo
Community Member
3 months ago

Interesting...Now, I'm going to look at my locks.

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#15

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The number "57" on a Heinz bottle. Apparently, the embossed number "57" on Heinz’s bottle is what the company’s spokesperson calls a soft spot. “All you need to do is apply a firm tap where the bottle narrows, and the ketchup will come out easier." No need to punch that bottle too much!

HeinzKetchup_US Report

Summer
Community Member
3 months ago

wait what???

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#16

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose You might think that wooden coat hangers are simply a fancier version of the ones made from plastic or wire. But in reality, they actually have a unique purpose to them. These closet hangers aren't just made from any wood. They're from cedarwood, which is known to repel bugs and moths. Not to mention its refreshing scent and durability. These hangers are perfect for heavy clothing that is susceptible to damage from insects, such as coats and jackets or dresses. Especially those that were made from wool.

Curtis Gregory Perry Report

Electric Ed
Community Member
3 months ago

A bit of a generalization here... Closet hangers are made out of any wood (just go to Ikea and see for yourself). Only cedar closet hangers are made out of cedar. I think I have one made of cedar wood, the rest are probably birch.

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#17

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Double-colored erasers. The different-colored sides are used to erase marks made by different pencils on different types of paper. While the soft pinkish-orange side is used for light grades of paper and lighter pencil marks, the blue side is meant for grainier, tougher paper and darker marks. The blue side was later promoted for removing pen marks because a lot of people didn't understand what it was meant for.

kekkoz Report

Rahul Eluri
Community Member
3 months ago

I still remember damaging paper trying to erase pen with this eraser

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#18

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Aside from the obvious use for buttons, you might have wondered why the ones women’s shirts are on the left. Especially when you consider that most people are right-handed. Turns out, putting the buttons on the left of clothes is an old tradition carried over from a time when buttons represented your social and financial status. If you owned buttons, you probably were being dressed by a chambermaid, and the buttons on your left were on her right when she was facing you.

nushtaev_dmitriy Report

chi-wei shen
Community Member
3 months ago

Chambermaids have gone but buttons are forever.

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#19

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The ridges on the “F” and “J” keys on the keyboard. They help your fingers find their location on the keyboard. This way you can type without having to glance down much easier.

Javier Morales Report

Data1001
Community Member
3 months ago

I'm very surprised if this is not widely known. I make use of that all the time.

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#20

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The holes in the handles of utensils. Sure, they're great when you want to hang your pan or pot on a wall but they're also perfect for holding spoons and ladles while cooking. That way, you won't get your kitchen counter messy!

Acuity_Design Report

Chris Jones
Community Member
3 months ago

Someone told me that if you place a wooden spoon across a pan it stops it boiling over... so I do that instead and so far so good!

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#21

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Long bottle-necks. The shape of a beer or a soda bottle is so familiar, nobody would think twice about it. But it turns out this long bottleneck is shaped this way on purpose.According to “Interesting Engineering,” such a design allows packers to seal off the top with a small bottle cap, reducing the size of the seal and thus saving money. Plus, it’s practical, since a small seal on a beverage container is stronger and more reliable than one which covers a larger area.

joshuaryanphoto Report

mph seti
Community Member
3 months ago

You also don't warm your beer when you grip it on the neck.

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#22

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Have you ever wondered why keyboard letters are arranged the way they are? To find the answer to this question, we need to take a look at the first keyboard ever invented. It belonged to the typewriter. Originally, keys were arranged in alphabetical order but typists got so good at their job that they would end up typing too fast and the key “arms” would get cross-wired and stuck. So, keyboard manufacturers had to randomize the order of keys to intentionally slow down typists to keep the machine running, and we haven’t changed it back to this day.

claybanks Report

Colin L
Community Member
3 months ago

"DVORAK" keyboards are designed for minimal finger movement so you can maximize your typing speed. Culturally, we are stuck with the QWERTY keyboards though.

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#23

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose In the 1970s, cleaning the mouth to keep it healthy wasn’t enough; people wanted something in the toothpaste to freshen the breath, too. Aquafresh answered the call by adding in a blue stripe to their paste to indicate that it could do both. After people began paying more attention to the health of their gums, the brand added a 3rd red stripe to their product, indicating that their paste now had triple action; cleaning, freshening, and plaque control. Even though solid white toothpaste offers the same benefits, companies continue to add stripes to their paste because it still sells.

bradleypjohnson Report

Tiari
Community Member
3 months ago (edited)

This is not really “A Hidden Feature Most People Fail To Notice“...

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#24

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose If you fly a lot, then maybe you’ve rolled over the possible uses for the tiny hole in your airplane window a time or two before. It actually serves two purposes: first, it allows airflow through to keep from too much pressure building in the plane and busting the window as it rises in altitude, and second, it keeps the windows from fogging up with all the warm breath of the passengers.

Lenny DiFranza Report

Scagsy
Community Member
3 months ago

Life's scary enough without HOLES IN PLANES. Argh!

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#25

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The delicious Toblerone candy bar was first manufactured in Switzerland, so it is easy to see why people assume that the odd triangular shape of the candy bar is a shout out to the Swiss Alps. Actually, the design of the chocolate bar is all about function, not aesthetic. The pieces are in triangles so that if you press on one of them with your thumb, it will snap off easily and leave you with the perfect sized serving.

Maria Eklind Report

chi-wei shen
Community Member
3 months ago

The perfectly sized serving of Toblerone is one complete bar at least (unless it is one of those giant bars).

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#26

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The brushes on the sides of escalators aren’t for polishing your shoes. You may have been using these escalator brushes to clean your shoes, however, these bristles are actually a big safety feature. One of the biggest reasons for escalator mishaps is people getting their clothes and bags stuck in them when they stand too close to the sides.

These nylon bristles play with your mind and make you keep your feet away from the escalator’s skirt panels, hence avoiding accidents.

Theen Moy Report

kathryn stretton
Community Member
3 months ago

Did anyone really ever think that they were for brushing shoes?

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#27

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The little slot at the end of measuring tape. Most measuring tapes come with a metal stub with a small slot on the end. In case all your hands are full, hang the slot on a nail for measurement. If you look closely, you will also notice that the stub is slightly serrated on one side. It can be used to mark the points without a pencil.

r. nial bradshaw Report

Scagsy
Community Member
3 months ago

Also, you can use the long yellow section for measuring the length of things. Fact.

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#28

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose A teeny-tiny pocket that's seemingly pointless. If you’re wearing a good ol’ pair of jeans, chances are it has a teeny-tiny pocket above the regular pockets on the front. The same place where you get your thumb stuck now and then. It was originally meant to tuck in a hand watch. Levi’s points out it has served more purposes throughout the years, like storing coins, matches, and tickets.

liz west Report

Daniel Lewis
Community Member
3 months ago

Wow, I always thought it was originally meant for a pocket watch.

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#29

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose What Are These Circles On A Window Of A Bus And What Do They Do?

Fred330 Report

mph seti
Community Member
3 months ago

Ultra violate? Sounds horrifying.

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#30

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose When you see a person with bobby pins in their hair, they’re usually wavy side up. This is because they probably assume the curves in the pin are there for fashion. The true purpose for the little waves, however, is to grip the pin into place by catching it to the underlying bulk of hair. In other words, wavy side down.

garann Report

SashaAlexandra
Community Member
3 months ago

Saw that info everywhere but that is not true. If you see that pin - the end of the wavy side is bent up. If you wear that wavy side down - that end would point to your skin directly. And the coat of those ends usually fell off. So you will get a sharp metal scratching your skin while wearing it.

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#31

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The Metal Plates On Staplers. You may have noticed the metal plate toward the front end of your stapler. If you just assumed it’s there to act as reinforcement to bend the staples you’d be right, but did you know there’s more to it than that, and that your stapler actually has settings? No joke. The metal plate is called an anvil, and if you turn your stapler upside down you can adjust it by spinning the wheel until it lines up with the seemingly random hole in the metal plate. This setting is for a “temporary staple”, and will guide the arms of your staple outward instead of inwards, making it easier to pull out the staple later.

ewanuzami Report

Alyssa Fry
Community Member
3 months ago

Does anyone else thing that’s a face?!

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#32

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Indentation at the bottom of a wine bottle. Contrary to popular belief, the indentation at the bottom of a wine bottle doesn’t actually indicate the superior quality of the wine. Also known as a punt, back in the day, it used to be found in handblown wine bottles.The seam of the bottle at the bottom was pushed up in order to prevent an outward nub at the bottom that would keep a bottle from balancing upright. It’s also thought that the punt added to the bottle’s structural integrity.Since modern-day bottles are much stronger and machine-made, punts serve no practical purpose and simply remain a part of tradition.

Jennifer Morrow Report

Scagsy
Community Member
3 months ago

I've seen waiters use them to make the pour look a little more fancy. Is that a thing?

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#33

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Hole in a pasta spoon. Even if you’re a pasta lover, it doesn’t mean you know what the hole in a spaghetti ladle is for. The hole is actually designed to serve as portion measurement to make sure you are cooking the right amount. It should suffice for one portion of spaghetti, so if you’re cooking for two, make sure you let two handfuls of pasta go through it.

_jessicadeann Report

Scagsy
Community Member
3 months ago

Note: Doesn't work on lasagne. And that's experience talking.

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#34

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Many men would probably be surprised to learn that not all women know the specific purpose of the small pocket sewn into their panties! Although some women have been using them for storing tampons or other small, private items, this actually isn’t why it’s there. The 'pocket' is actually called a panty gusset, and was never intended to be a pocket. Rather, it is an extra piece of fabric sewn in for women’s hygiene and in the higher-end panties, the gusset is sewn completely shut. It becomes a 'pocket' when manufacturers are unwilling to spend the time and money to get those last few stitches in!

Vivian Ward Report

Random Panda
Community Member
3 months ago

........who would store anything in this "pocket"? This is the silliest thing I've heard.

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#35

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Loop on Your Shirt. There are some shirts that contain a piece of cloth in the form of a loop. This was actually designed so you can hang your shirts on a hook in a dressing room or even a closet. It’s a perfect solution when you don’t have any hangers left.

Viralcurrent Report

Rick
Community Member
3 months ago

I thought this was widely known

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#36

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Paper Condiment Cups At Fast Food Restaurants. Have you ever asked yourself why the fast food restaurants use such tiny cups for the ketchup and mustard? Based on the amount of fries they serve in even their smallest size container, clearly they are aware that you’ll be needing just a little bit more dipping sauce. So then, why the folded paper cups? It all comes down to the purpose of those folds. When you unfold the paper cups, they turn into small paper platters that can hold a great deal more sauce for all your dipping needs. Nifty, right?

Foodbeast Report

Electric Ed
Community Member
3 months ago

Would it not be easier to serve these cups unfolded? Just a stack of paper sheets.

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#37

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose If you have ever picked up Chinese food takeout and requested paper plates only to be judged, there’s a good reason for that. The Chinese food takeout boxes are made in such a way that when you unfold them, they become cardboard dinner plates. The best part? Your food is already on the platter, so you can just dig in. They’re looking at you like you’re crazy because you already got the plates!

NJ_Nmaster Report

Electric Ed
Community Member
3 months ago

No, I have never requested paper plates at a take-away. Have you?

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#38

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Silica gel packets. You probably know that those little silica gel packets are meant to preserve freshness. There’s no magic here. The packets have silica gel beads inside that absorb humidity in an enclosed environment, protecting products from dampness.Typically, when silica gel packets absorb water, of which they can contain up to 40 percent of their weight, they're no longer effective. However, you can try to restore them by drying them out again in the sun.

Iain Cuthbertson Report

mph seti
Community Member
3 months ago

It's a good idea to save these, and put them in your camera bag, laptop computer bag, etc.

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#39

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose While you may have thought that the colorful bristles on your toothbrush are just yet another marketing gimmick, this seemingly pointless addition actually serves a real purpose. The blue color of your toothbrush bristles will fade right about the same time you need to get a new one. It's a reminder that you aren’t exactly keeping things as clean and fresh as you could be.

Kevin N Report

Troux
Community Member
3 months ago

I have to question whether these serve a real purpose for me or for the guys selling toothbrushes. The color seems to wear out MUCH MUCH faster than the bristles.

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#40

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The lids of many restaurant cups can double as coasters. Just flip them upside down and set the cup on them. It will keep your cup from dripping all over the place and could help prevent a mess.

Report

MrTree1779
Community Member
3 months ago

And now the lid is contaminated with the bacteria and other germs from the table, and you won't want to put it back on the container. I'd rather wipe up the condensation than contaminate my lid.

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#41

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The side holes in Converse shoes. If you've ever owned a pair of Converse, you've probably noticed these two little holes on the side of the shoes. It turns out, these two are designed to allow you to get creative with lacing techniques, like zig-zagging them across the whole width of our feet. The second use of the holes is to provide much-needed ventilation. Another theory is that if the shoes don’t fit properly, you can tighten them up by using these two holes.

nqoe Report

Doria
Community Member
3 months ago

yah, they are present on Converse rainshoes as well. good luck staying dry!

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#42

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Rubber Bumps In The Grooves Of Your Tire Tread. These little rubber bumps are so inconspicuous, you might never notice them unless checking the tread on your tire. Oddly enough, that is exactly what they are meant for. The little-raised edges inside the grooves of your tire’s tread are there to let you know when it’s time to change your tires. While many people still rely on the old penny head trick, an easy way to tell if you need to get to the tire shop is if the edges of your tread are even with the bumps. If they are, then you are driving on legally unsafe tires. If the edge is above that of the bump, you’re good to keep cruising for a while.

amtyres.co.uk Report

Bill Taylor
Community Member
3 months ago

Yup, you can also use a penny, place the penny head side down in the groove and if you can see the top of Lincoln's head, change your tires. Also even if you have sufficient tread and you don't drive much, always replace tires that are 5 years or older because of dry rot.

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#43

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Golf Ball Dimples. It turns out, golf players didn’t like nice and smooth golf balls since they didn’t play as well as the used ones. When they started using old golf balls, manufacturers had to come up with a way of selling the new balls. As a result, they redesigned the old ones and made them to have dimples that recreated this “worn down” look and feel.

wikipedia Report

Colin L
Community Member
3 months ago

There funny thing is, the dimples on a golf ball allow the ball to have less air resistance. It is a tricky differential equation to solve in aerodynamics, but dimpling isn't just cosmetic.

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#44

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The tiny dot next to the camera on an iPhone. While you might think that it's some sort of miniature flash device or a fashion statement, it's actually a microphone that helps record sound when you're using the back camera.

aleksowlade Report

Omar Pearson
Community Member
3 months ago

Or when facebook and messenger want to hear your private conversation better...

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#45

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Eat Tic Tacs the Right Way. Did you know that all Tic Tac containers were designed to dispense one Tic Tac at a time? That certainly explains the tiny indentation on the lid which is shaped exactly like the candy. Most of us just lift the tab up and shake the container a couple of times until six of these fresh minty treats fall into the palm of our hands.

[deleted] Report

Sonja
Community Member
3 months ago

so all the tic-tac advertisements were wrong! they always served 2 pieces by the standard way (shake it out) and not the right one (serve a single portion on lid)

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#46

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The Colorful Bread Tags. If you collect bread tags for some odd reason, you might have noticed that they come in different colors. It turns out that the color tags indicate the day the bread was delivered. So, if you need to know how fresh your bread is, all you have to do is look at the color tag.

wikipedia Report

chi-wei shen
Community Member
3 months ago

However, you also need to know to which day a certain colour refers to.

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#47

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose A Toothpaste Tube’s Colored Squares. The toothpaste tube’s colored squares at the bottom aren’t there because they look pretty. They’re eye marks that tell assembly line machines where to cut and where to fold the packaging. Otherwise, toothpaste tubes would come out stuck to one another.

bradleypjohnson Report

Scagsy
Community Member
3 months ago

stuck to what? I need this information!

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#48

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose Child-proof medicine bottles. Child-proof prescription bottles generally have one or two raised sections above a ribbed base. These raised sections on a cap make it harder to remove the cap. However, if you don’t have to worry about the little ones at home, there’s a quick trick for hassle-free opening. When you remove the cap, flip it upside down and screw it back in. When the raised sections are pointing toward the bottom of the bottle, you can open the bottles easily.

unknown Report

Electric Ed
Community Member
3 months ago

Never seen a bottle like that...

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#49

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The Threaded Bands On Audio Jacks. The deep ridges or threads on audio-jacks aren’t just there for a tighter fit when plugged in. These bands are made of an insulating material used to protect the wires while the sound is being transmitted. Additionally, the number of bands indicates which end goes where. Three bands equate to one band per left and right ear, and the third band for grounding, and should be plugged into the stereo or amplifier, while 2 bands indicate the end that plugs into a device.

headphonesty Report

William Bonner
Community Member
3 months ago

The description is nonsense. The number of rings plus the tip corresponds to the number of conductors in the cable. The purpose of the cable determines the number of conductors needed.

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#50

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The little wings on an Apple charger can be flipped up to wind the wire, keeping it tangle-free in your bag.

apple Report

Kim St
Community Member
2 months ago

duh

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#51

Everyday-Things-That-Have-Hidden-Purpose The Loops In The Frame Of A Grocery Cart. The grocery cart, of all things we use in our day to day life, should certainly be the most self-explanatory, or at least one would think. Sometimes the purpose of everyday items get lost amongst its main function, which in this instance is to carry your groceries around while you shop. The manufacturers of these seemingly basic carts are more forward-thinking than we’ve given them credit for, though. While even our checkers and baggers don’t know it, there is a purpose behind those metal loops that frame the top fold out section of our grocery carts; to hang your bags with light items like bread and eggs from so they don’t get smashed among your heavier goods. Do your grocers a favor and show them how it’s done next time to make their lives easier.

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Tim Stoneman
Community Member
3 months ago

No need to use so many words to explain this obvious function

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