Blessed be those who didn't have to go through the trouble of learning the English language. Some might say that learning Japanese or Icelandic might be the most difficult task out there, but even the most complicated aspects of those languages have some kind of logic behind them. English grammar and the language itself, on the other hand, has some truly nonsensical characteristics to it and a plethora of arbitrary rules.

Those with English as their native language never have to consciously work through the kinks of spelling out Wednesday or why writers write, but fingers don't fing and grocers don't groce. Learning English as a secondary language is a real minefield once you figure out the basic grammar rules and step into more specific areas. And these people decided to point some of the most confusing things out there to prove their point. English is a weird language and at times makes no sense whatsoever, especially for a language that is so widespread.

#1

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

weeping-wandrian Report

Orillion
Community Member
1 year ago

Who's up for the defenestration of Donald Trump. I say we do it overmorrow.

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#2

English Nonsense

Suave-Matthews Report

Lilli
Community Member
1 year ago

*mind blown*

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To be fair, many linguists would easily find a logical answer to most of the problems presented in these messages, as English language has a lot of nuances (like words being borrowed from Latin and Greek, or the fact that some words had their origins lost or they ceased to be used in spoken language). However, that doesn't mean that they still don't fail to confuse people trying to learn the language, as even the most sound explanation might seem nonsensical when the original problem could be solved by, well... changing the language? Ah, let's leave this for the linguists to figure out and non-native speakers to be confused about, right?

#3

English Nonsense

RedBombX Report

HANS
Community Member
1 year ago

You just ruined the ending for me!

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#4

English Nonsense

[deleted] Report

Chicken Pox
Community Member
1 year ago

This is genius!

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#5

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

just-shower-thoughts Report

PyroarRanger
Community Member
1 year ago

Oh shit.

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#6

English Nonsense

tidywrities Report

SykesDaMan
Community Member
1 year ago

It took me a while to remember which one is positive and which one is negative between horriffic and terrfic...

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#7

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

apollinares Report

Lilli
Community Member
1 year ago

I feel you dude

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#8

English Nonsense

thinice41 Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

This is definitely really interesting!

Kalaih Zora
Community Member
1 year ago

It actually happens also in Spanish. Jail=cárcel Jailor=carcelero / Prison= prisión Prisoner= prisionero

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Peko
Community Member
1 year ago

Jail and prison are not synonyms.

Mary Rose Kent
Community Member
1 year ago

True—they’re a spectrum: detention/lock-up/jail/prison/solitary

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Mark Johanen
Community Member
1 year ago

Just to be pedantic, "jail" and "prison" aren't synonyms. A "jail" is a place to hold people for a short time, people who have been arrested and are awaiting trial but not yet convicted nor sentenced, or people being held for a short time for a minor crime. A "prison" is a place to hold people convicted to long sentences.

My O My
Community Member
1 year ago

Interesting. Didn't know this

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CrunChewy McSandybutt
Community Member
1 year ago

And you can be "imprisoned" but not "imjailed."

Eunice Probert
Community Member
1 year ago

Add to that, jail is sometimes spelled gaol.

Pseudo Puppy
Community Member
1 year ago

"goal" = original british english. "Jail" = phonetic americanised-english

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Sergio Bicerra Descalzi
Community Member
1 year ago

Same in spanish: Carcel an Prisión are synonyms, Carcelero and Prisionero are antonyms.

Rosie Price
Community Member
1 year ago

Okay that messes with my brain!!!

Salinger Foyard
Community Member
1 year ago

gaol is also a word

Pseudo Puppy
Community Member
1 year ago

They're not actually synonyms, as they relate to 2 totally different situations, buildings, circumstances, and word-origins. They've incorrectly been interchanged. Yes, both relate to a person being detained, but aren't the same meaning. (think "hotel" and "house". You can live / sleep / pay for, both. But they aren't the same thing). Jail = short term detention, while awaiting trial. Prison = long term detention upon conviction. ie Jail = being processed. Prison = found guilty. "Prison" comes from the word "imprison" ie to detain someone. Therefore, the "imprisoner" is the one detaining / the "prisoner" is the one detained. With the word "jail", "jailer" = the one detaining / there is no evolution of the word other than "the jailed", to refer to the one detained (typcially, it will revert to the original word "prisoner". Due to the need for detention facilities, "jails" have begun to be used for short-term convictions of about 2 yrs or less, for lesser convictions

A panda-gineer
Community Member
1 year ago

And we “seed” a fruit, but “de-vein” a shrimp. Why not “de-seed”?

Pseudo Puppy
Community Member
1 year ago

because with fruit you're removing the seeds. With a shrimp, you're removing the "vein" of their innards. ie you're removing two totally different things, from 2 totally different object. :)

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Jon Garrett
Community Member
1 year ago

They jail and prison are synonyms in the UK. And jail can be spelt gaol too.

Ryo Bakura
Community Member
1 year ago

They're not synonyms in my part of the UK. You go to jail in a police station, you go to prison after being sentenced in court.

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Armandt Gardner
Community Member
1 year ago

Jail and prison are actually two very different things.

Petrina Dendy
Community Member
1 year ago

Jail is spelt gaol

David Vera
Community Member
1 year ago

You park on driveway yet drive on parkway

Lindy Mac
Community Member
1 year ago

I believe sentences of less than a year are served in a jail and over a year one goes to prison. Thankfully I do not have first hand knowledge on this subject!

Pandola
Community Member
1 year ago

strange

Anys Blue
Community Member
1 year ago

Also happens in Spanish, Carcel y prision - Carcelero y prisionero

Francie Traschen
Community Member
1 year ago

jail and prison shouldn't be synonyms. jail is where you wait before you go to prison.

Linda Robinett
Community Member
1 year ago

Hmm, I love it when people point these things out.

Noah Rosenthal
Community Member
1 year ago

jail and prison are not synonyms.

JV
Community Member
1 year ago

Jail means "little cage". The word is of Latin and French origins : a jail in French used to be called a "geôle", written before as "jeole or "gaiole", hence "gaol" in old English. My humble theory is that this word gaol explains the word goal used in sports (like a hockey net). Same goes for jailer (EN) and goêlier (FR) and goaler (EN). Don't forget that half of English words come from French and a lot from old German.

Micah Juan
Community Member
1 year ago

Jail and Prison are not synonyms. Jail is before sentencing and Prison is after sentencing

Theory Buchannon
Community Member
1 year ago

wait...........what

lucas the spider fangirl
Community Member
1 year ago

i didn't even know jailer was a word.

Bruce Adams
Community Member
1 year ago

*Jailor

Guido Pisano
Community Member
1 year ago

This is wonderful

Analyn Lahr
Community Member
1 year ago

And often enemies.

Monika Soffronow
Community Member
1 year ago

PRISON etymology: From Middle English prisoun, prison, a borrowing from Old French prison, from Latin prehensiōnem, accusative singular of prehensiō, from the verb prehendō. Doublet of prehension. JAIL etymology: From Middle English gayole, gaylle, gaille, gayle, gaile, via Old French gaiole, gayolle, gaole, from Medieval Latin gabiola, for Vulgar Latin *caveola, a diminutive of Latin cavea (“cavity, coop, cage”). (Wiktionary) In other words, the 'jail' is the cage where you put the prisoner you have apprehended.

Michael Isaacson
Community Member
1 year ago

Not really synonyms. "Jail" is a local holding facility, generally very short term or temporary. "Prison" is where you go for keeps.

Give me a beagle any day...
Community Member
1 year ago

Never thought of this before, wow!

Pal Mezgal
Community Member
1 year ago

It's the same in spanish: Cárcel and Prisión are synonyms, but carcelero and prisionero are antonyms.

ThatRandomMofo
Community Member
1 year ago

I'd hope so

juice
Community Member
1 year ago

woah

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#9

English Nonsense

notmyname123007 Report

Carson Skjerdal
Community Member
1 year ago

That is incredible ha ha

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#10

English Nonsense

cherlishPanda Report

So Dou
Community Member
1 year ago

We have the exact same word in french and with the same meaning ... others meaning too ;)

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#11

English Nonsense

saranowitz Report

Yoel Schvarcz
Community Member
1 year ago

In french it's called Double-V

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#12

English Nonsense

madamplease Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

English pronunciation was invented by Satan

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#13

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

bisexualgambit Report

Full Name
Community Member
1 year ago

What profession is a handyman in then?

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#14

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

tigerpellets Report

Artex Gorilla
Community Member
1 year ago

Brits also use 'Quite' in a sarcastic manner if agreeing with someone (who they don't agree with).

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#15

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

dailybadjokes Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

This is my kind of pun

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#16

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

mariadamsfoster Report

juice
Community Member
1 year ago

no one knows

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#17

English Nonsense

Vaxtin Report

Eirik Johnsbråten
Community Member
1 year ago

I sent a cent with a peculiar scent.

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#18

English Nonsense

MooSaysCow Report

Sherbaan Naab
Community Member
1 year ago

Two questions, same answer: because you don't wash properly.

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#19

English Nonsense

Sherman_Beardman Report

PyroarRanger
Community Member
1 year ago

America explain... I am confusion!!

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#20

English Nonsense

qikipedia Report

Aileen
Community Member
1 year ago (edited)

I’ve also heard, “I before E except when your feisty foreign neighbor Keith leisurely receives eight counterfeit beige sleighs from caffeinated atheist weightlifters. Weird.”

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#21

English Nonsense

TweetSmarter Report

Steven Cook
Community Member
1 year ago

The last two lines may read incorrect until said...

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#22

English Nonsense

[deleted] Report

HANS
Community Member
1 year ago

I'd rather not do either or do neither.

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#23

English Nonsense

volcanichamster Report

Emily Ashcraft
Community Member
1 year ago

one is used by the people of sarcasm and one is used by regular people

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#24

English Nonsense

Swibblestein Report

Bleh
Community Member
1 year ago

This made more sense than it should've

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#25

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

invite-me-to-your-memories Report

Aldhissla VargTimmen
Community Member
1 year ago

There's a broadcasted spelling competition for the Dutch language as well ^^ Dutch is easier though, makes more sense :)

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#26

English Nonsense

dylandipzz Report

Tina Hugh
Community Member
1 year ago

If this isn’t true, it should be

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#27

English Nonsense

_charlmorgan Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

When I hear someone say "the other day", I assume it's something within a month. I never think someone would mean something they did like a year ago

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#28

English Nonsense

[deleted] Report

Full Name
Community Member
1 year ago

I wonder if uncovered wagons were the first form of mass transportation so you literally were "on" it.

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#29

English Nonsense

orangepek0e Report

Stephania Kolarova
Community Member
1 year ago

Stefan: good efening

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#30

English Nonsense

AdventurousMan Report

George Utley
Community Member
1 year ago

Fridge is a slang shortening of one of the original refrigerators - Fridgidaire...

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#31

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

emblian Report

Matilda Gross
Community Member
1 year ago

Intonation is key.

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#32

English Nonsense

Marimelida Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

Because it has nothing to do with the words man/woman and comes from Latin humanus

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#33

English Nonsense

Djimmieboy Report

Eduard Korhonen
Community Member
1 year ago

Because it's Zoë, but everyone forgets the importance of umlauts

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#34

English Nonsense

Grammarly Report

Daria B
Community Member
1 year ago

Heh. This one is cute. ♥

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#35

English Nonsense

MundaneRiot Report

Evil Little Thing
Community Member
1 year ago

WATCH ME! You can food anything if you just eat it.

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#36

English Nonsense

GabbieHanna Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

Because "Philippines" is in English while "Filipino/Filipina" is Spanish. No need to stress out. In Spanish the country is Filipinas. All is well, they're just words in two different languages!

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#37

English Nonsense

Unrelated96 Report

Ben Smith
Community Member
1 year ago

Y’all.

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#38

English Nonsense

kanoe170 Report

Daria B
Community Member
1 year ago

One is AWful, the other is AWEsome. Maybe here lies the difference.

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#39

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

rudy_mustang Report

Chris
Community Member
1 year ago

WTF is balogna?!

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#40

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

Fiasko21 Report

Piou
Community Member
1 year ago

You mean man's laughter isn't the same as manslaughter? Hmmm maybe I should reconsider my hobbies

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Note: this post originally had 48 images. It’s been shortened to the top 40 images based on user votes.