Blessed be those who didn't have to go through the trouble of learning the English language. Some might say that learning Japanese or Icelandic might be the most difficult task out there, but even the most complicated aspects of those languages have some kind of logic behind them. English grammar and the language itself, on the other hand, has some truly nonsensical characteristics to it and a plethora of arbitrary rules.

Those with English as their native language never have to consciously work through the kinks of spelling out Wednesday or why writers write, but fingers don't fing and grocers don't groce. Learning English as a secondary language is a real minefield once you figure out the basic grammar rules and step into more specific areas. And these people decided to point some of the most confusing things out there to prove their point. English is a weird language and at times makes no sense whatsoever, especially for a language that is so widespread.

#1

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

weeping-wandrian Report

Orillion
Community Member
1 year ago

Who's up for the defenestration of Donald Trump. I say we do it overmorrow.

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#2

English Nonsense

Suave-Matthews Report

Lilli
Community Member
1 year ago

*mind blown*

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To be fair, many linguists would easily find a logical answer to most of the problems presented in these messages, as English language has a lot of nuances (like words being borrowed from Latin and Greek, or the fact that some words had their origins lost or they ceased to be used in spoken language). However, that doesn't mean that they still don't fail to confuse people trying to learn the language, as even the most sound explanation might seem nonsensical when the original problem could be solved by, well... changing the language? Ah, let's leave this for the linguists to figure out and non-native speakers to be confused about, right?

#3

English Nonsense

RedBombX Report

HANS
Community Member
1 year ago

You just ruined the ending for me!

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#4

English Nonsense

[deleted] Report

Chicken Pox
Community Member
1 year ago

This is genius!

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#5

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

just-shower-thoughts Report

PyroarRanger
Community Member
1 year ago

Oh shit.

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#6

English Nonsense

tidywrities Report

SykesDaMan
Community Member
1 year ago

It took me a while to remember which one is positive and which one is negative between horriffic and terrfic...

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#7

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

apollinares Report

Lilli
Community Member
1 year ago

I feel you dude

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#8

English Nonsense

thinice41 Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

This is definitely really interesting!

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#9

English Nonsense

notmyname123007 Report

Carson Skjerdal
Community Member
1 year ago

That is incredible ha ha

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#10

English Nonsense

cherlishPanda Report

So Dou
Community Member
1 year ago

We have the exact same word in french and with the same meaning ... others meaning too ;)

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#11

English Nonsense

saranowitz Report

Yoel Schvarcz
Community Member
1 year ago

In french it's called Double-V

Jesper Rasmussen
Community Member
1 year ago

And in Danish.

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AP
Community Member
1 year ago

This one is easy. In Greek, "U" is a "V". So, a "double U" actually IS a a double "V". When the two are combined, they create the W

MtC
Community Member
1 year ago

This is not entirely correct. In Romance languages originally "W" was written as "VV". However, in Germanic languages it was written as "UU". Example: "Neerwinden" was originally UUinethe. Hence why in French it's "double V" and in English it's "double u".

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littlesaresare
Community Member
1 year ago

Because the /w/ sound was originally written as uu. The letter W is comparatively recent.

Tiny Dynamine
Community Member
1 year ago

Depends on your handwriting. For me it's a double U.

Jo Morris
Community Member
1 year ago

And why isn't a "m" called a "Double-N"?

WholettheCatsout
Community Member
1 year ago

Because Double-N doesn't make an M

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Iggy
Community Member
1 year ago

In Irish (we don't usually call it Gaelic), it doesn't matter because there are no Ws in the Irish language!

Mary Rose Kent
Community Member
1 year ago

There is no V sound in Thai, so words like Vinamek and Sukhumvit are pronounced with a W sound.

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Dirk Van Troyen
Community Member
1 year ago

Why not just call it a "We"? I'm Flemish and we do it like that. And no, the Dutch don't do it right. They pronounce a W like a V. And a V like an F. And a G like a snot couching gargling sound. Dutch pronounciation is odd.

Dirk Van Troyen
Community Member
1 year ago

And don't get me started on German!

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Cindy Snow
Community Member
1 year ago

It used to be two u s

Pamela Scott
Community Member
1 year ago

Because script has changed at one time is was literally a double u!

Ringo Starkey
Community Member
1 year ago

You didn't need literally.

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Akorfa No.9
Community Member
1 year ago

I think it depends on how you write your "w" :?

SurrealKit
Community Member
1 year ago

It can also be written to look like two "U"s.

Daria B
Community Member
1 year ago

I think this one has roots in ancient Latin. When you see the remnants of the tangible cultural heritage, you might notice familiar words with the "U"s being written as "V"s. I wonder when and how has this change of shape and phoneme occurred....

David Vera
Community Member
1 year ago

In Latin created by Romans there is no Letter u only V

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Arietis
Community Member
1 year ago

Because Latin.

Jarno Flinkers
Community Member
1 year ago

In Dutch it's the first pronunciation in whale. So it sounds like wha.

David Vera
Community Member
1 year ago

The word in Spanish ( castellano) is Ballena ( soft v sound)

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Ashley Galyen
Community Member
1 year ago

U and V used to be used interchangably. Like the upper and lowercase version of a letter. There really wasn't much of a standard then and the reader knew if it was a u or v sound by the context. Later typesetters finally standardized it, but English kept the old Double U name for W. French must have been more progressive with their Double V.

Janelle Krein-Silvers
Community Member
1 year ago

I have had this issue since 1st grade!

Ani Archeron
Community Member
1 year ago

Judging by the replies, English likes to feel REALLY REALLY SPECIAL. Like its word for pineapple.

Mae
Community Member
1 year ago

Yes! the word ananas is used in 42 languages, while pineapple or piña is used in 10

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Magali Lassalvy
Community Member
1 year ago

In French we call it double-v...but take a look at our numbers !!

Tegan Frid
Community Member
1 year ago

Because cursive writing is a thing

Dean Walsmith
Community Member
1 year ago

Pronunciation. Wuh. Double U.

Matthew Mann
Community Member
1 year ago

Because Welsh.

Victoria Rey Piuma
Community Member
1 year ago

I know! !!!!!

Agus Satoto
Community Member
1 year ago

not in Indonesian. it's pronounced 'wé'. The V is pronounced 'fé'. That's why we don't have Miss V here 😄

Andrew Olas
Community Member
1 year ago

because it makes the sound of two U's

Bridgette Gaudin
Community Member
1 year ago

It all began with Latin, where we get our alphabet. But Latin had no U. The letter U was invented to distinguish the U sound from the V sound. It's not "double V" because it doesn't make the V sound.

Alejandro Suarez
Community Member
1 year ago

I always ask myself that. Weird thing, on spanish, we say it right.

Shelli Perez Lorton
Community Member
1 year ago

If you write it in cursive, it’s literally two “u”s

Viet Nguyen
Community Member
1 year ago

I guess it is the way w is written in the past, it isn't popular now. It does look like 2 uu

JV
Community Member
1 year ago

Originally it was two Us, but they ended up being pronounced as Vs since that's what they looked like in script.

Tracy Potter
Community Member
1 year ago

In cursive (a dying writing skill, I know), the w is softer and more rounded like a u. Maybe that is why.

Lynda Momalo
Community Member
1 year ago

The Classical Latin alphabet had only 23 letters, not the 26 that we have today. ... Uppercase and lowercase letters are allographs. Before the use of the letter U, the shape V stood for both the vowel U and the consonant V. In the picture below you can see the letter V used in places were it would be pronounced as a U. https://www.dictionary.com/e/theletteru/

Taryn Wallace
Community Member
1 year ago

Doublé V in Spanish v is pronounced "ve"

Daniel da Silva
Community Member
1 year ago

In script writing it's two U letters

Alexander Schoemaker
Community Member
1 year ago

Used to be a double u, but they changed the way it's written after it got its name.

Dave van Es
Community Member
1 year ago

Before the U became a U, it was written as a V

Guglielmo Marconi
Community Member
1 year ago

It's latin

Mark Kelly
Community Member
1 year ago

some are written like U's

GamerRain
Community Member
1 year ago

A v is a sharp u

John Montgomery
Community Member
1 year ago

I always wondered if the people labeling the letter were looking at two different version. Discarding cursive a capitalized W is a double v, but a lower case w is usually written as a double u. Of course typing screws that idea up completely.

KLo
Community Member
1 year ago

In Spanish it is doble-v or double -v

Maya Ayeis
Community Member
1 year ago

how would a double v sounds??

Give me a beagle any day...
Community Member
1 year ago

Yeah? And what are apartments not called "togetherments?" And how you can park on a driveway and drive on a parkway....?

Ginette Leblanc
Community Member
1 year ago

in french it is adouble V

Freya Fluharty
Community Member
1 year ago

The way it was written initially. And printed. The U has a tail at the bottom, the V at the top. When you write W the tail ends at the bottom.

Callie Ge
Community Member
1 year ago

It’s Vay & double vay in German and Dutch

Bill
Community Member
1 year ago

Because English is a Germanic rooted language

Jennifer Brekke
Community Member
1 year ago

It depends on which font you use.

moeless
Community Member
1 year ago

Depends on how you write, right?

Alex Noott
Community Member
1 year ago

I've often wondered just that!!

Kenneth V. Jørgensen
Community Member
1 year ago

In Danish it is called double V.

Ann Gullberg
Community Member
1 year ago

In Swedish it is call double V

Ann Gullberg
Community Member
1 year ago

In Swedish it is called double V

nala simba
Community Member
1 year ago

Agreed. I always thought that!

Aliaa Hwijah
Community Member
1 year ago

Double V in German. He said:" My vife is vonderful."

Anton Reyes
Community Member
1 year ago

It’s “doble-ve” in Spanish

Miss Cris
Community Member
1 year ago

It's "doble uve", meaning "double-v"

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Anton Reyes
Community Member
1 year ago

It is in fact called a “doble-ve” in Spanish

Amy Smith
Community Member
1 year ago

Because Wheelbavvrow would just sound silly

ADHORTATOR
Community Member
1 year ago

Perhaps because in Latin V is spelled U?

Chiderah Abani
Community Member
1 year ago

Depends on how you write it I guess. Maybe the English were at some point in time "u"ing what they now "v" in writing.

rhyan lumilay
Community Member
1 year ago

Uhmm and why if you write two connected U and V you still read it as double you?

YsaPur
Community Member
1 year ago

in all these languages double w is pronounced like a v, but in English it isn't pronounced like a v, more like a u. not vindov, but uindou

Linda Robinett
Community Member
1 year ago

This letter was created from the Latin alphabet (the one we all use) So Vine Vide Vice I came, I saw, I conquered is pronounced winee widey wikey in Classical Latin. So the French are more correct than the English.

lucas the spider fangirl
Community Member
1 year ago

m is a double-U upside down

Godspeed
Community Member
1 year ago (edited)

In spanish it is called "Doblé Ooo" :P

Octavia Hansen
Community Member
1 year ago

"V" is the original "U", when carving stone, arcs are difficult, straight lines easy. As stone masons got better and printing came into fashion so much later, the sounds were separated with the letters but "W" still has roots in double "U". It's an art/printing thing . . .

Mewton’s Third Paw
Community Member
1 year ago

UwU

Carolina Fernández González
Community Member
1 year ago

In spanish you can say "double-v" and "double-u" you can choose :)

Miss Cris
Community Member
1 year ago

Not in Spain.

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Robert Robi Z
Community Member
1 year ago

y is a w called...

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#12

English Nonsense

madamplease Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

English pronunciation was invented by Satan

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#13

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

bisexualgambit Report

Full Name
Community Member
1 year ago

What profession is a handyman in then?

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#14

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

tigerpellets Report

Artex Gorilla
Community Member
1 year ago

Brits also use 'Quite' in a sarcastic manner if agreeing with someone (who they don't agree with).

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#15

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

dailybadjokes Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

This is my kind of pun

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#16

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

mariadamsfoster Report

juice
Community Member
1 year ago

no one knows

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#17

English Nonsense

Vaxtin Report

Eirik Johnsbråten
Community Member
1 year ago

I sent a cent with a peculiar scent.

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#18

English Nonsense

MooSaysCow Report

Sherbaan Naab
Community Member
1 year ago

Two questions, same answer: because you don't wash properly.

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#19

English Nonsense

Sherman_Beardman Report

PyroarRanger
Community Member
1 year ago

America explain... I am confusion!!

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#20

English Nonsense

qikipedia Report

Aileen
Community Member
1 year ago (edited)

I’ve also heard, “I before E except when your feisty foreign neighbor Keith leisurely receives eight counterfeit beige sleighs from caffeinated atheist weightlifters. Weird.”

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#21

English Nonsense

TweetSmarter Report

Steven Cook
Community Member
1 year ago

The last two lines may read incorrect until said...

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#22

English Nonsense

[deleted] Report

HANS
Community Member
1 year ago

I'd rather not do either or do neither.

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#23

English Nonsense

volcanichamster Report

Emily Ashcraft
Community Member
1 year ago

one is used by the people of sarcasm and one is used by regular people

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#24

English Nonsense

Swibblestein Report

Bleh
Community Member
1 year ago

This made more sense than it should've

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#25

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

invite-me-to-your-memories Report

Aldhissla VargTimmen
Community Member
1 year ago

There's a broadcasted spelling competition for the Dutch language as well ^^ Dutch is easier though, makes more sense :)

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#26

English Nonsense

dylandipzz Report

Tina Hugh
Community Member
1 year ago

If this isn’t true, it should be

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#27

English Nonsense

_charlmorgan Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

When I hear someone say "the other day", I assume it's something within a month. I never think someone would mean something they did like a year ago

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#28

English Nonsense

[deleted] Report

Full Name
Community Member
1 year ago

I wonder if uncovered wagons were the first form of mass transportation so you literally were "on" it.

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#29

English Nonsense

orangepek0e Report

Stephania Kolarova
Community Member
1 year ago

Stefan: good efening

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#30

English Nonsense

AdventurousMan Report

George Utley
Community Member
1 year ago

Fridge is a slang shortening of one of the original refrigerators - Fridgidaire...

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#31

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

emblian Report

Matilda Gross
Community Member
1 year ago

Intonation is key.

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#32

English Nonsense

Marimelida Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

Because it has nothing to do with the words man/woman and comes from Latin humanus

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#33

English Nonsense

Djimmieboy Report

Eduard Korhonen
Community Member
1 year ago

Because it's Zoë, but everyone forgets the importance of umlauts

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#34

English Nonsense

Grammarly Report

Daria B
Community Member
1 year ago

Heh. This one is cute. ♥

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#35

English Nonsense

MundaneRiot Report

Evil Little Thing
Community Member
1 year ago

WATCH ME! You can food anything if you just eat it.

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#36

English Nonsense

GabbieHanna Report

Kaisu
Community Member
1 year ago

Because "Philippines" is in English while "Filipino/Filipina" is Spanish. No need to stress out. In Spanish the country is Filipinas. All is well, they're just words in two different languages!

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#37

English Nonsense

Unrelated96 Report

Ben Smith
Community Member
1 year ago

Y’all.

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#38

English Nonsense

kanoe170 Report

Daria B
Community Member
1 year ago

One is AWful, the other is AWEsome. Maybe here lies the difference.

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#39

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

rudy_mustang Report

Chris
Community Member
1 year ago

WTF is balogna?!

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#40

English-Language-Logic-No-Sense

Fiasko21 Report

Piou
Community Member
1 year ago

You mean man's laughter isn't the same as manslaughter? Hmmm maybe I should reconsider my hobbies

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Note: this post originally had 48 images. It’s been shortened to the top 40 images based on user votes.