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Some find the abandoned places creepy, while others consider them exciting and they are even eager to explore them. Since not everyone has the opportunity as well as the necessary skills to go on an adventure themselves and travel to these eerie destinations, other explorers make sure they capture their discoveries and share them with a wider audience on their social media. We all agree these places are not for everyone to visit, but we must admit that the photographs showcasing these unique locations are both scary and beautiful. Also, there is something very alluring in them…

If you are interested in having a glimpse into the urbex community and you are looking for the best profiles dedicated to this content, you may be interested in checking out “Deserted Places” on Instagram. This account features amazing photographs and videos shared by people who visited the most mesmerizing places on the planet.

We hope you like the list of images we prepared for you today. And who knows, maybe you will be the next one to get lured into the eerie world of deserted places.

#3

Deserted-Abandoned-Places-Pics

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Der Kommissar
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9 months ago (edited) DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Tah Prom (Jungle Temple), near Seam Reap in Cambodia. Pictured is another of my favorites, the Buddha Tree in Ayutthia, Thailand images-649...088ce6.jpg images-64967ab088ce6.jpg

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Bored Panda has reached out to Rafał, the creator of GoUrbex. We wanted to find out more about this specific activity he dedicated himself to - the exploration of abandoned places. In addition to his YouTube channel counting over 1 million views, and nearly 150 videos, Rafał documents his urbex adventures and discoveries on his Instagram profile. First, we asked him how he became interested in urban exploration, and what inspired him to start GoUrbex. We found out that: “I think it's a general curiosity. I've always been interested in how things are produced, how they work, and so on. Eventually, I came across videos and photos of abandoned places on the internet, and that's when I realized that this hobby is called urbex. I learned about it relatively late, only in 2011. I live near the Kampinos National Park, and I used to go with friends to explore the bunkers there, where it all began. In 2013, I bought a sports camera and tried to record it, but I wasn't satisfied with my footage at the time, so I put the exploration aside for a while.

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It wasn't until 2016 that I stumbled upon the location of a well-preserved recreational center called Okrąglaki online. The place was literally perfectly preserved. Unfortunately, at that time, I didn't know that it's better not to delay visiting such places. A friend I was supposed to go with kept postponing the trip, and when we finally went there six months later, the center was significantly different from the footage from winter 2016. Initially, my channel was supposed to focus on abandoned places in my area, but when I returned to the topic after some time, I realized that the name shouldn't limit the locations. So, in 2017, my initiative under the name GoUrbex was born. Over the years, I even had the opportunity to visit the closed zone of Chernobyl four times. Additionally, on my channel, I sometimes try to restore electricity in abandoned buildings using a converter powered by a small battery. It's a small reference to my enthusiasm for electronics.”

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Asked if he could share one of his most memorable experiences while exploring an abandoned location, Rafał answered: “Yes, the most interesting place I visited was the PZL Wola factory. Paradoxically, I still haven't made a film from that location, but that's because the original way of filming didn't suit me. This factory produced engines for tanks, large power generators, as well as boats and smaller ships. The facilities were enormous, abandoned for years and guarded. When I first entered the premises, I felt like a spy; we had to go unnoticed without knowing the entrance to the building. We walked around the abandoned fire station unit adjacent to the building we were interested in. A few days later, we returned and encountered scrap collectors who showed us a fairly well-hidden entrance. The facilities were huge, and what's best is that I would often go there after work to explore new areas in the factory. Each visit to that place uncovered new rooms, areas, and secrets of the facilities. There, I met many other explorers, and I still keep in touch with some of them to this day, back in November 2017. Interestingly, I met Michał there, who had explored Sobieskiego 100 on multiple occasions. I used to watch his films as one of the first when I was looking for materials about abandoned places. Unfortunately, 1.5 years later, the factory was demolished.”

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#8

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hitex
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Magnificent window! I'd love to see those images in the glass up close. This should be a historical artifact

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Next, we were curious about what challenges Rafał typically faces when exploring abandoned places, and how he overcomes them. He shared with us: “I think that, first and foremost, there is fear, uncertainty, and the fear of being detected. But curiosity and adrenaline compensate for that. I explored 90% of the places I visited with one or two other people. I believe that going ‘urbexing’ alone is highly dangerous; it's better to have someone who can help or at least call for help in case of an accident. In abandoned places, I'm most afraid of encountering people and, possibly, animals; I don't believe in ghosts. Sometimes, in safer places, I go alone to build my confidence.”

#12

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gerard julien
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Château de la Mothe-Chandeniers, France. NOT abandoned anymore : In December 2017, a French startup organized a crowdfunding campaign site, and 27,190 people having to pay at least €50 each joined the cause, raising €1,600,000, to purchase the castle with the aim of preserving it. chateau-64...34ea51.jpg chateau-649690a34ea51.jpg

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We were also wondering how the explorer prioritizes safety, both for himself and his team. Rafał said: “If I see that a particular structure is in poor technical condition, etc., then I don't enter. During urbex, it's crucial to watch where you step, pay attention to the material the floor is made of. Very old buildings often had wooden ceilings that can collapse due to moisture. For safety reasons, I don't take people I don't know, people who have never been on urbex trips, on explorations with me. I wouldn't want anything to happen to anyone because it's difficult to convey that specific knowledge and intuition. Not everyone has the technical sense to assess risks, and I definitely err on the side of caution.”

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#15

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Matthew Cooper
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I understand wanting to preserve, but if this stuff wasnt salvaged thats a crime.

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Lastly, we asked Rafał if there are any tips he could give to our readers and aspiring urban explorers who want to delve into abandoned places. We were told that: “First and foremost, do not enter places that are closed and secured. Urbex is not about breaking in, so if it's closed, don't force entry. As I mentioned earlier, pay attention to where you step and avoid taking excessive risks for the sake of a film or a photograph.”

On a side note, we would like to encourage you to check out Rafał's channel, GoUrbex. The creator mentioned that some of his videos have English subtitles available for people worldwide curious to follow his impressive adventures.

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#24

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hitex
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

The arches must have once been near works of art. I could only imagine how magnificent this room once looked

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#25

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hitex
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Look at the columns, the roof. Must've once been an architectural gem

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#26

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An abandoned subway located in Russia

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#27

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Gunkanjima, also known as Battleship Island, was once a thriving industrial site, housing over 5,000 workers in its heyday. The island was completely self-sufficient, with its own schools, hospitals, and even a swimming pool. However, as the demand for coal decreased and the island's resources were depleted, the mine was eventually closed in 1974, and the island was abandoned. Since then, Gunkanjima has remained largely unchanged, and the abandoned buildings and structures on the island have become a popular tourist attraction. Visitors can take guided tours of the island and explore the abandoned buildings, which have been left to decay and have been overtaken by vegetation.Despite its eerie atmosphere, Gunkanjima is an important part of Japan's history and stands as a testament to the country's rapid industrialization in the 20th century.

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Peter Becker
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

You might remember it from a scene of the James Bond movie Skyfall. Where he has to shoot a shot glass from a ladies head.

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Jen Fabulous
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9 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

It's an art installation: La maison dans la Loire is the brainchild of French artist Jean-Luc Courcoult, who created it as part of the 2007 Estuaire Art Exhibition, which invited a number of international artists to create large-scale works inspired by the Loire and its nearby estuary.

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Note: this post originally had 132 images. It’s been shortened to the top 35 images based on user votes.