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Posts Tagged ‘Paris’

Surreal and Playful Furniture By Lila Jang

By • Jan 30th, 2014 • Category: Design, Interior Design, Latest Posts, Weird

There’s basic Ikea furniture, there’s fancy furniture, and then there’s these creative and surreal artist furniture pieces by Lila Jang, a sculptor from South Korea who created twisted and bloated versions of 18th-century French furniture.

24 Amazing Hotels You Would Rather Be Sitting In Right Now

By • Jan 29th, 2014 • Category: Architecture, Latest Posts, Travel

We know that a lot of you like to read our articles while you’re at work (naughty, naughty pandas), so we’ve created a virtual vacation trip with amazing hotels around the world that you’d rather be sitting in right now. These locations will take you from the icy forests of Finland to the jungles of Bali and from the streets of Paris to the turquoise Mediterranean waters of Greece. As diverse as they are, there’s one thing tying them together – each location is perfectly suited for you to take a breather and relax.

Untouched Apartment in Paris Opened After 70 Years Has Painting Worth $3.4M

By • Jan 6th, 2014 • Category: Art, Interior Design, Latest Posts, Other

In 1942, a young Parisian woman fearing Nazi persecution fled to Southern France, leaving behind a lavish apartment in Paris that she would never return to. 70 years later, its hidden trove of artwork has finally been exposed for the first time. One piece, however, stood out from the rest of the artistic and historic relics – 19th-century Italian painter Giovanni Boldini’s portrait of his muse, Marthe de Florian. The painting itself has been valued at roughly $3.4 million.

3D Grass Globe Illusion at Paris City Hall

By • Sep 12th, 2011 • Category: Art, Latest Posts, Optical Illusions

Today, we want to show you another wonderful 3D illusion which is installed in front of the steps of Paris’s city hall. French artist François Abélanet created this incredible 3-dimensional grass globe with the help of about ninety workers and called it ‘Qui croire?’ (‘who to believe?’). When viewed at a certain angle it looks as though it was a large sphere.