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“Sure, You’re The Boss”: Supervisor Insists Worker Increase Machine Speed Above Its Limits, Regrets It Within Minutes
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“Sure, You’re The Boss”: Supervisor Insists Worker Increase Machine Speed Above Its Limits, Regrets It Within Minutes

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Not too long ago, Bored Panda covered a story of that one typical sequence of events and surrounding factors whereby fresh meat of a superior arrives and starts “changing things” without any knowledge of the complexities of how things were and the repercussions of the changes. Because both the complexities and repercussions were a thing.

Well, it happened again, in another part of the world. There was a natural change in supervisors whereby the next super in line decided to mess with some very delicate piece of machinery and then blame it on the guy operating said piece of delicate machinery when it damaged the product. Oh, and malicious compliance is somewhere in there.

More Info: Reddit

You gotta appreciate karma as a concept as it seems like the only tool still capable of teaching poor management a lesson on… management

Image credits: ThisIsEngineering (not the actual photo)

This one’s a quickie (not that kind), but a goody. A sibling of a machinist shared a story of malicious compliance. Back in 2010s Australia, said brother worked for a small engineering company. While the pay was not ideal, the work made it well worth it as they produced everything from custom parts for racing cars to bigger jobs for the military.

The brother was actually a floor lead among around 50 other employees, and reported back to the floor supervisor who reported to the owners. However, the current supervisor retired, and the brother tried his luck. They didn’t pick him up, but they did pick someone else. And, oh boy, this one was an oof.

And this one manager had it coming, starting with asking an employee to do as he was told, and then suddenly shifting the blame

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Image credits: littlewasknown

OP described the new super as a “tyrant.” On the super’s first day, he started being just plain mean by harassing the brother for not getting the job. “And that he is the new boss now so get used to it.” Wow, just wow. That’s the sort of crud we’re dealing with…

Some time later, the brother was asked to run a CNC machine (whatever this is), but at a faster pace. 20% faster, to be precise. The brother pointed out that that is not the best idea, but the supervisor wished to commit career suicide in the fastest way possible, i.e. he insisted on it. And so, the brother obliged—quite likely with “get used to it” in mind.

Too bad dumping the blame on someone else didn’t work out, but malicious compliance surely did and it started his 6-week demise

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Image credits: littlewasknown

Image credits: Mandiri Abadi (not the actual photo)

Cue malicious compliance. The machine was set to work 20% faster, and sure enough, within mere minutes, the alloy they were working on was obliterated. Maybe. Definitely damaged.

A wild owner appeared in a matter of seconds, asking the brother what happened. A wild super also appeared, pointing fingers at the brother, but all his bros at the factory stepped in to back his story of who had actually decided to do the whole 20% faster thing.

Well, the owners went ballistic on the supervisor, as it was expected given the context and how things were handled. But, in the long run, it signified the start of what ended up being a 6-week continuous downfall. The brother was not there to see it unravel, though, as he had found another job, a better one, and quit.

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Nearly 7,000 people applauded the machinist, and the comment section was full of people poking fun at the manager and sharing stories

6 weeks later, though, he got a phone call. It was the owners. They explained that the super had been sacked for “poor work standards”, and so they wanted the brother to come to replace him. He declined.

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Image credits: Anamul Rezwan (not the actual photo)

Folks online applauded OP’s brother in the form of nearly 7,000 upvotes (97% approval rate). Despite this sort of deal happening quite often, people still seemed surprised that managers like this still exist. But maybe this sort of karma is also what they need to make change happen.

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Others shared stories of bad management, and how others screwed up their machinery to a higher degree. And of course the floor was the first to blame. Oh, and you gotta appreciate that one commenter’s wordplay: “Sounds like the biggest tool in the firm was that new supervisor.”

Do check out the original post in context here, but not without sharing your thoughts, stories, or what you ate for lunch today in the comment section below!

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marikofujita avatar
Mariko Fujita
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Yey ^^ increasing feed rate and cutting speed on a soft metal~ I am not an engineer but I work for an engineering firm to look over 図面 (technical drawings) but to increase CNC speed you have to either increase the speed to max that the machine switches tools and moves towards the part, which is fine, but it isn't going to cut time on the processing speed while it is cutting so you need to adjust the feed rate and cutting speed. But.. excessive adjustment in these that surpass your tip nose radius will cause the tip to be pushed through the material before it can cut in line with the previous cut.. this will make the part not smooth and feel/look like a screw. It can also destroy the tip very early and potentially the tool. If supervisor wants this extra speed, they should adjust speeds on scrap piece of material, but for optimal cutting we use mathematics to determine cut speeds, rotation speed, etc so guesswork is not super needed unless you wish to try something out of the usual ^^;

arandomanvil avatar
A Random Anvil
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Been told to do this before. Refused. Still will. In addition to quality issues, you run through cutting tools faster, and obvious safety concerns. No thanks.

mackeral_bisquik avatar
Mackeral Bisquik
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Malicious compliance, no I like to think of it as creating an opportunity for mgmt to do the right thing when stupidvisors make these decisions. Ego and pride won't let them. In these situations do exactly as these misfits want and let them know how little can be accomplished by the end of the day. How do we say f**& you, let us count the ways.

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marikofujita avatar
Mariko Fujita
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Yey ^^ increasing feed rate and cutting speed on a soft metal~ I am not an engineer but I work for an engineering firm to look over 図面 (technical drawings) but to increase CNC speed you have to either increase the speed to max that the machine switches tools and moves towards the part, which is fine, but it isn't going to cut time on the processing speed while it is cutting so you need to adjust the feed rate and cutting speed. But.. excessive adjustment in these that surpass your tip nose radius will cause the tip to be pushed through the material before it can cut in line with the previous cut.. this will make the part not smooth and feel/look like a screw. It can also destroy the tip very early and potentially the tool. If supervisor wants this extra speed, they should adjust speeds on scrap piece of material, but for optimal cutting we use mathematics to determine cut speeds, rotation speed, etc so guesswork is not super needed unless you wish to try something out of the usual ^^;

arandomanvil avatar
A Random Anvil
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Been told to do this before. Refused. Still will. In addition to quality issues, you run through cutting tools faster, and obvious safety concerns. No thanks.

mackeral_bisquik avatar
Mackeral Bisquik
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Malicious compliance, no I like to think of it as creating an opportunity for mgmt to do the right thing when stupidvisors make these decisions. Ego and pride won't let them. In these situations do exactly as these misfits want and let them know how little can be accomplished by the end of the day. How do we say f**& you, let us count the ways.

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