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“He Won’t Budge!“: New York Tenant Refuses To Move Out, Delaying A $70M Project, Ends Up Getting A $25M Lawsuit In Return
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Architecture, People1 month ago

“He Won’t Budge!“: New York Tenant Refuses To Move Out, Delaying A $70M Project, Ends Up Getting A $25M Lawsuit In Return

Every person wants to own a house at some point during their lifetime. It gives many folks a sense of completeness, stability and independence. You’ll finally be able to create your ideal long-term nest, and you’ll never have to deal with greedy landlords ever again. However, finding an appropriate housing deal that ticks all of your boxes is practically impossible – as there’s always something that gets in the way, whether it’s the skyrocketing prices or the jaw-dropping mortgage rates.

Of course, homeownership is a big financial decision, and before you know that you can fully commit to it without negatively impacting your lifestyle, you’re stuck with renting. There’s a common misconception about it; people say that it’s a waste of money since you’re not investing into anything and are basically throwing your money away. But you’re financing a roof over your head, so how could it ever be wasteful? On the other hand, renting does come with a load of problems, and this 52-year-old tenant can definitely confirm.

More info: YouTube | Twitter

Tenant refuses to move out of his NYC apartment, delays a $70M project on his building and gets a $25M lawsuit against him

Image credits: Inside Edition

A 52-year-old Manhattan citizen and his dog have gotten themselves into a little bit of a pickle as the tenant is completely refusing to leave his perfect NYC apartment. The thing is, the man is delaying a grand $70 million condo project and has been sued for over $25 million.

The man has called this Upper West Side one-bedroom apartment a home for 16 years

Image credits: Inside Edition

Last summer, the Naftali Group, a privately held global real estate development and investment company, bought the Manhattan’s Eagle Court building for $70 million and told all the tenants to skedaddle. Ahmet Nejat Ozsu, though, wasn’t ready to give it up without a fight. The 52-year-old refused to move out of his one-bedroom apartment and together with his lawyer, Adam Leitman Bailey, they’re expecting a seven-figure payout for the caused inconvenience.

Image credits: Inside Edition

Image credits: Inside Edition

Mr. Ozsu is holding on tight to his fairly spacious apartment with a private deck on the top floor of a beautiful NYC building. With a generous renting price of $3,350 a month, the Naftali group couldn’t move the tenant with a $30,000 buyout offer – that, in fact, wouldn’t even be able to sponsor him a year worth of rent, nor with a $25 million lawsuit that they recently filed against him. There are 128 apartments and only 16 tenants are still occupying the property – however, the man is the only renter who has not agreed to move out.

He claims that the new landlord is bullying him out of the apartment by installing a security camera and a loud industrial fan

Image credits: Inside Edition

Image credits: Inside Edition

Moreover, Ahmet Nejat Ozsu and his lawyer believe that the new landlord is using bullying tactics to somehow convince the tenant to leave the premises. A security camera was installed in the hallway right outside Mr. Ozsu’s apartment along with an industrial air filter that constantly irritates the man with its loud whirring.

Image credits: Inside Edition

Image credits: Inside Edition

The 52-year-old specializes in software engineering, though, until recently, he was unemployed and owes approximately $13,600 in rent. At the beginning of this year, Ozsu applied for an Emergency Rental Assistance Program that was created during the pandemic to make funding available to those who are unable to pay rent or utilities. If the request is approved, the man could be entitled to stay in his 700-square-foot home for at least another year.

Along with his lawyer, the man expects a seven-figure payout for the caused inconvenience

Image credits: Inside Edition

Though the Naftali Group have yet to file for the construction permits, it was revealed that, in all likelihood, the 128-unit apartment building will be torn down and reconstructed into a luxurious tower.

You can watch the interview here:

Fellow online users shared their thoughts regarding this uneasy situation

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Zophra
Community Member
2 months ago

Can someone explain? I don't understand this. He is a tenant - so couldn't the new landlord just wait until the rental contract is up and then potentially evict him? Maybe I don't know if there are contracts that do not have an "end date" in which the man is seriously in the right and should hold out for a better settlement offer.

Amanda Reicha
Community Member
1 month ago

The pandemic gives home rights to continue living there. It was passed that people who lost income were allotted no evictions, payments assisted, and no rent increases. He's under that protection right now, so he doesn't have to move and the landlord can't kick him out.

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Yoel Shapiro
Community Member
1 month ago

He's a tenant, not an owner! If he prefers to stay until end of contract, let him do so - Naftaly group knew about active tenants, it's a liability they had to consider. If he agrees to move, at most he should get costs (rent difference over remaining period, moving) and perhaps a three months rent good-will bonus. Why the hell does he except to get compensated the worth of an entire (Florida) apartment?

Yoel Shapiro
Community Member
1 month ago

Also, he completely overestimated his bargaining power. There's a deadline working against him, every day he loses relevance, and even at this point in time they refuse to pay more than 70k... This group (most certainly) didn't put their own money, it's a loan, so the only pain he is causing is the interest over the additional delay- since they have yet to obtain permits it's probably shorter than his lease. In the mean while, he'll have legal fees, waste his time with lawyers and loose sleep - instead of figuring out how to adapt and fall on his feet.

Load More Replies...
Tom Hanlin
Community Member
2 months ago

So, he's been unemployed and living in a place where he can't afford the rent, and he's just holding out to see if they'll bribe him heavily. This is not a sympathetic story.

Aaricia
Community Member
1 month ago

He has to do that otherwise he would go homeless, even less of a chance of finding a new job during a pandemic.

Load More Replies...
Load More Comments
Zophra
Community Member
2 months ago

Can someone explain? I don't understand this. He is a tenant - so couldn't the new landlord just wait until the rental contract is up and then potentially evict him? Maybe I don't know if there are contracts that do not have an "end date" in which the man is seriously in the right and should hold out for a better settlement offer.

Amanda Reicha
Community Member
1 month ago

The pandemic gives home rights to continue living there. It was passed that people who lost income were allotted no evictions, payments assisted, and no rent increases. He's under that protection right now, so he doesn't have to move and the landlord can't kick him out.

Load More Replies...
Yoel Shapiro
Community Member
1 month ago

He's a tenant, not an owner! If he prefers to stay until end of contract, let him do so - Naftaly group knew about active tenants, it's a liability they had to consider. If he agrees to move, at most he should get costs (rent difference over remaining period, moving) and perhaps a three months rent good-will bonus. Why the hell does he except to get compensated the worth of an entire (Florida) apartment?

Yoel Shapiro
Community Member
1 month ago

Also, he completely overestimated his bargaining power. There's a deadline working against him, every day he loses relevance, and even at this point in time they refuse to pay more than 70k... This group (most certainly) didn't put their own money, it's a loan, so the only pain he is causing is the interest over the additional delay- since they have yet to obtain permits it's probably shorter than his lease. In the mean while, he'll have legal fees, waste his time with lawyers and loose sleep - instead of figuring out how to adapt and fall on his feet.

Load More Replies...
Tom Hanlin
Community Member
2 months ago

So, he's been unemployed and living in a place where he can't afford the rent, and he's just holding out to see if they'll bribe him heavily. This is not a sympathetic story.

Aaricia
Community Member
1 month ago

He has to do that otherwise he would go homeless, even less of a chance of finding a new job during a pandemic.

Load More Replies...
Load More Comments
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