This summer, during the worst measles outbreak in decades, New York passed a law that ended religious exemptions to vaccinations for children in public schools.

Parents were given a two week grace period after the start of school to provide vaccination records or their kids wouldn’t be kicked out. As that grace period nears its end, many parents begin to fight back, furious that the law is actually being upheld.

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To be clear, the students can return to school if their parents vaccinate them. State health officials told BuzzFeed News that 26,217 unvaccinated New York children in public schools, private schools, parochial schools, daycare centers, and prekindergarten programs obtained religious exemptions during the 2017–18 school year.

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Image credits: daynabug77

The measles outbreak that prompted the new law is easing. Earlier this month, Mayor Bill de Blasio declared an end to the measles outbreak in New York City, its epicenter. Since October 2018, there have been 654 measles cases in the city and 414 in other parts of the state, where transmission has also slowed. According to the CDC, children are most at risk from measles. One out of every 20 children infected with measles will contract pneumonia, while one in 1,000 will die from the virus. Other complications can include swelling of the brain (which can lead to deafness or disabilities).

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People had a lot to say about this situation