“Entitled Parent At Pool Doesn’t Like A Taste Of Her Own Medicine”: Woman Demands Children Share Toys With Her Kid, Regrets It | Bored Panda
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“Entitled Parent At Pool Doesn’t Like A Taste Of Her Own Medicine”: Woman Demands Children Share Toys With Her Kid, Regrets It
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“Entitled Parent At Pool Doesn’t Like A Taste Of Her Own Medicine”: Woman Demands Children Share Toys With Her Kid, Regrets It

Being kind to others, giving them a helping hand, sharing your things with those who might be down on their luck—all of these are very admirable qualities. Human beings are hardwired for being social and our brains reward us for our altruism. However, there’s always a chance that someone will try to take advantage of your kindness.

Case in point, a redditor shared a bit of drama that recently happened at the pool. They told the r/entitledparents subreddit how some mom yelled at their kids to share their toys with her own child… something that they’d previously been doing anyway.

Disliking the entire situation and wanting to shut down this behavior, the redditor took matters into their own hands and gave the entitled mom a taste of her own medicine. Oh, did she find it bitter! Scroll down to read the full story in the OP’s own words, as well as how the internet reacted. Once you’re done, tell us what you would have done, Pandas.

Parenting blogger Samantha Scroggin, the mastermind behind the witty ‘Walking Outside in Slippers’ blog, kindly shared her thoughts about generosity, sharing, and entitlement with Bored Panda. Scroll down to see what she told us.

Learning to share your toys is a wonderful thing… until someone starts taking advantage of your kindness

Image credits: wanderland.xyz (not the actual photo)

A parent shared how they reacted when an entitled mom started berating their kids at the pool

Image credits: Armin Rimoldi (not the actual photo)

Credits: DogLvrinVA

“I find teaching my kids to share is most effective when they experience the rewards of sharing. For example, when another child is so happy to play with a toy that belongs to my kid,” mom and blogger Samantha told Bored Panda.

“My kids are not so enamored with sharing that I worry about them being taken advantage of. They have plenty, and can certainly share. If I thought my kids were being taken advantage of, I would step in and tell my kids it’s ok for them to say no to sharing anymore in that moment.”

She added: “And of course, some belongings are personal and shouldn’t be shared. Like diaries, fragile items, and keepsakes.”

Samantha said that it’s important for parents to be aware of their privilege, as well as help their own children understand their own inherited privilege, too.

“I want my kids to work for what they are given, like allowance. I stress the value of hard work and the benefits of generosity.”

Learning to share and being generous with your time, energy, attention, and resources, is generally a good way to go through life. And in an ideal world, there would be no need to even consider that someone might take advantage of you. However, we don’t live in an ideal world.

As the redditor’s story showed us, there are some extremely entitled people out there who demand that you share what you have with them. And yet, they’re unwilling to do the same. They go on to teach their kids that they can get anything they want by virtue of just existing. They don’t even have to put in any effort. Or be polite.

That’s the kind of thinking that the OP tried to shut down by taking the entitled mom’s book: she was acting hypocritical because she didn’t apply her own values to herself. Obviously, taking some stranger’s book is a bit unexpected, but it might have been necessary to set some boundaries and put an end to this nonsense. After all, nobody enjoys seeing their kids being berated. Especially if they did nothing wrong.

Though we’re optimistic about the fact that people can and do change, whatever their age, the fact remains that it’s easier to create good values and habits early on in life. What this means is that how parents raise their kids matters. A lot! The way to deal with potential entitlement is to nip it in the bud. Teach your children to be charitable instead of just expecting special treatment wherever they go.

Though everyone sometimes feels like they deserve to be treated special, things break down when you completely ignore this need in others. Everyone deserves to be treated with equal respect. When you demand special privileges, you may end up losing friends who no longer find your company fun.

That’s why it’s so important for parents to instill habits like humility and valuing others while their kids are still small. Otherwise, they might soon find that nobody wants to share their toys with their children no matter where they go—whether it’s the local pool or the neighborhood playground.

Here’s how the internet reacted to the story. Some users shared their own experiences with similar situations

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kathrynbaylis_3 avatar
Kathryn Baylis
Community Member
1 year ago (edited) DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

People in the comments are confusing sharing with taking turns using something. They’re not the same. Taking turns has to do with something that is meant for everyone to use—-and often bought for the public or the group (like laptops for kids in a school)—-but not all at the same time. Sharing has to do with ASKING someone if you could use something that belongs to them exclusively. You. Always. Ask. First. Then, if they say OK, take better care of it than you would if it was yours, and always—-promptly!—-return it in the same, or better, condition than when you got it. If it does break, whether by you mishandling it or it was just worn out when you got it, you then better have it repaired, or you pay to replace it, without having to be asked first.

mwolcendorf-motog avatar
m.w.
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Yep. Sharing is not about turns, but about boundaries. I *may* share, but I do not have to, and it doesn't matter, if I use it right now, or not. It's mine, i set the rules. And if I don't want to share it with you, tough luck.

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christine-backbay avatar
Uncommon Boston
Community Member
1 year ago (edited) DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

My former sister in-law did the same thing to my son. My ex gave my son a boggie board to use in the ocean. His sister demanded he give it to one of her kids when they asked -- even if he was using it. Her brother, my ex was furious. Since she didn't understand what sharing is, her kids were forbidden to use it. She would never listen to me and my son always 'shares'. My son wanted to use it most of the day, but couldn't. These things sold for around $20. It was absurd.

cindy_hurd avatar
Cindy Hurd
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Awww poor kid..that is really sad that he couldn't even use the gift his own dad gave to him?

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kathrynbaylis_3 avatar
Kathryn Baylis
Community Member
1 year ago (edited) DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

People in the comments are confusing sharing with taking turns using something. They’re not the same. Taking turns has to do with something that is meant for everyone to use—-and often bought for the public or the group (like laptops for kids in a school)—-but not all at the same time. Sharing has to do with ASKING someone if you could use something that belongs to them exclusively. You. Always. Ask. First. Then, if they say OK, take better care of it than you would if it was yours, and always—-promptly!—-return it in the same, or better, condition than when you got it. If it does break, whether by you mishandling it or it was just worn out when you got it, you then better have it repaired, or you pay to replace it, without having to be asked first.

mwolcendorf-motog avatar
m.w.
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Yep. Sharing is not about turns, but about boundaries. I *may* share, but I do not have to, and it doesn't matter, if I use it right now, or not. It's mine, i set the rules. And if I don't want to share it with you, tough luck.

Load More Replies...
christine-backbay avatar
Uncommon Boston
Community Member
1 year ago (edited) DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

My former sister in-law did the same thing to my son. My ex gave my son a boggie board to use in the ocean. His sister demanded he give it to one of her kids when they asked -- even if he was using it. Her brother, my ex was furious. Since she didn't understand what sharing is, her kids were forbidden to use it. She would never listen to me and my son always 'shares'. My son wanted to use it most of the day, but couldn't. These things sold for around $20. It was absurd.

cindy_hurd avatar
Cindy Hurd
Community Member
1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Awww poor kid..that is really sad that he couldn't even use the gift his own dad gave to him?

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