ADVERTISEMENT

Leigh Rubin is the creative genius behind the beloved "Rubes Cartoons." With a knack for creating imaginative scenarios and witty punchlines, Rubin's comics transport readers to a parallel universe where anything can happen – from Snoop Dogg being in detention to overachiever garden gnomes taking care of their garden.

“Inspiration is all around us if we take the time to look for it. I read practically anything I get my hands on. I believe the rest is from “internal” (inspiration), that is to say, in my head," the artist shared in a previous interview with Bored Panda. So sit back, relax, and get ready to scroll down for a hearty dose of comic relief!

More info: Instagram | rubescartoons.com | Facebook | twitter.com

Bored Panda reached out to Rubin again to learn more about the behind-the-scenes of his comic creation. We asked him about his unique style and what draws him to feature animals and inanimate objects in his cartoons. "Animals have always been something I’ve been drawn to (pardon the pun)," the artist shared. "My mom had a book on how to draw animals which I still have. Animals are a delightful way to poke fun at humans. We live on an absolutely absurd planet and animals, both domestic and wild keep us grounded."

Every artist has a special place where they feel most creative. This space, filled with personal items and necessary tools, becomes a haven for new ideas. It could be a messy desk with sketchpads and paintbrushes, or a simple room with a computer and a comfy chair. These places are crucial for their creativity. For Rubin, his office, with stuffed animals and a gentle rescue dog, a six-year-old Aussie Shepherd, is his creative workspace.

Besides the workspace, many artists have routines or habits that help them get into the right mood to create. When asked about his rituals, Rubin shared that sharpening his pencil signals it's time to be creative.

ADVERTISEMENT

As a cartoonist, it's fun to see how people react to your drawings. Over time, how people engage with cartoons has changed because of new technology, social media, and what's popular in society. Rubin, a cartoonist, says that before the internet "(waaaaaay back in the Stone Age)", he received letters. Now, people reach out through social media, texts, or email. "People write when they either find something very funny and/or relatable, or both. Either way, it’s always fun to hear from them."

#7

Rubes Cartoons, The Art Of Humor In A Single Frame (New Pics)

rubescartoons Report

Add photo comments
POST
susanne avatar
Danish Susanne
Community Member
3 weeks ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I forgive the historically incorrect meeting between T-rex and Flintstones because of the song.

View More Replies...
View more commentsArrow down menu

"When asked what he thinks sets Rubes Cartoons apart from other comic strips or cartoons, the artist replied: "Rubes® celebrates its 40th birthday on November 1st, which is very hard to believe. I’d like to think it’s lasted this long because it stays consistently fresh, relatable, and (hopefully) funny."

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
See Also on Bored Panda
#20

Rubes Cartoons, The Art Of Humor In A Single Frame (New Pics)

rubescartoons Report

Add photo comments
POST
kristiflanigan avatar
LizzieBoredom
Community Member
3 weeks ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

She tried to prove he was the father, but her lawyer said she didn't have a casing.

View More Replies...
View more commentsArrow down menu
#21

Rubes Cartoons, The Art Of Humor In A Single Frame (New Pics)

rubescartoons Report

Add photo comments
POST
ADVERTISEMENT
See Also on Bored Panda