Bored Panda works better on our iPhone app
Continue in app Continue in browser
BoredPanda Add Post

The Bored Panda iOS app is live! Fight boredom with iPhones and iPads here.

I Went To An Old Jewish Quarter In Budapest To Find Out What The Fuss Is All About Ruin Bars (20 Pics)
105points
User submission
82
21.1K
Travel3 years ago

I Went To An Old Jewish Quarter In Budapest To Find Out What The Fuss Is All About Ruin Bars (20 Pics)

Budapest’s old Jewish quarter is home to the craze of ‘ruin bars’ – old industrial buildings converted to drinking joints. So what’s all the fuss about? I went to find out.

More info: curiologist.com

Started in 2002, Szimpla Kert is the oldest and most iconic ruin bar

It had been an old factory that had become dilapidated

The genius idea was to renovate it by making everything a bit worse

Not that there isn’t any innovation

With things to look at

While you’re having a nice beer in the bath

And if you don’t like what you see

Change it – just bring something to draw with

There are some empty spaces left

There’s plenty of greenery

With the odd bicycle and pair of legs thrown in

You can also buy a candle of the prime minister, Victor Orban to burn

Victor Orban declared Hungary an illiberal state

But it looks like liberalism is flourishing here

So who drinks in this bar?

After a couple of trips and a chat with a bouncer

I learned that a big proportion of the visitors were tourists

Who can come and do what they like

And then go home

And tell their friends that Hungary is actually really cool

21Kviews

Share on Facebook
You May Like
Popular on Bored Panda
Write comments
Charlotte
Community Member
3 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I'm sorry, but it just looks like a glorified crack den to me. I think the Jewish people who used to live and work there would turn in their graves of they saw the messy hipster bullshit their neighborhood had turned into. My grandmother wouldn't even let me eat an apple without a plate and a napkin. I think that if I had started writing on the walls, she would have roundhouse kicked me straight through it.

Alib
Community Member
3 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

This neighborhood was a Jewish ghetto—Jews were forced to live there and many starved to death. The last thing they are "turning in the graves" about is ruin bars. I don't "love" gentrification but Szimpla has done a good thing: It turned a decrepit building into a creative community space with a weekly farmers market, live music, and amazing food. It's just a great place to meet up with friends.

Load More Replies...
Laura M D
Community Member
3 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I studied in Budapest for a while and this was the place. It wasn't unusual that random people asked to share your table, and since the general atmosphere was nice and polite, you could do it without a problem. I even took my parents there, they were shocked at first, but appreciated the singularity. Oh, I miss those days and miss Szimpla so much!

Sara Holt
Community Member
3 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I look at this ‘cool’ space and mourn my late mom’s family who lived in Hungary. Their home and belongings were confiscated by the Germans and Hungarians. All Jews were taken to the concentration camps. My mom was 13 (children under 16 were normally killed immediately but an old man in the crowd asked her how old she was and told her to lie) and saw her baby brother thrown alive into a bonfire. She had other siblings. Only an older brother lived. My mom’s toes froze off during a death march in the snow. I couldn’t sit in a ruin bar and not be aware of the ruined lives, the trauma of the ruined survivors.

Turo Rudi
Community Member
3 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Please be assured that the victims of the Holocaust in Hungary have not been forgotten in this neighborhood. There are monuments and plaques and museum exhibitions commemorating them. Many residents' ancestors were Holocaust survivors and are very much aware of how their families suffered. Today, those same residents live and laugh and have babies and visit ruin pubs.

Load More Replies...
Load More Comments
Charlotte
Community Member
3 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I'm sorry, but it just looks like a glorified crack den to me. I think the Jewish people who used to live and work there would turn in their graves of they saw the messy hipster bullshit their neighborhood had turned into. My grandmother wouldn't even let me eat an apple without a plate and a napkin. I think that if I had started writing on the walls, she would have roundhouse kicked me straight through it.

Alib
Community Member
3 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

This neighborhood was a Jewish ghetto—Jews were forced to live there and many starved to death. The last thing they are "turning in the graves" about is ruin bars. I don't "love" gentrification but Szimpla has done a good thing: It turned a decrepit building into a creative community space with a weekly farmers market, live music, and amazing food. It's just a great place to meet up with friends.

Load More Replies...
Laura M D
Community Member
3 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I studied in Budapest for a while and this was the place. It wasn't unusual that random people asked to share your table, and since the general atmosphere was nice and polite, you could do it without a problem. I even took my parents there, they were shocked at first, but appreciated the singularity. Oh, I miss those days and miss Szimpla so much!

Sara Holt
Community Member
3 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I look at this ‘cool’ space and mourn my late mom’s family who lived in Hungary. Their home and belongings were confiscated by the Germans and Hungarians. All Jews were taken to the concentration camps. My mom was 13 (children under 16 were normally killed immediately but an old man in the crowd asked her how old she was and told her to lie) and saw her baby brother thrown alive into a bonfire. She had other siblings. Only an older brother lived. My mom’s toes froze off during a death march in the snow. I couldn’t sit in a ruin bar and not be aware of the ruined lives, the trauma of the ruined survivors.

Turo Rudi
Community Member
3 years ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Please be assured that the victims of the Holocaust in Hungary have not been forgotten in this neighborhood. There are monuments and plaques and museum exhibitions commemorating them. Many residents' ancestors were Holocaust survivors and are very much aware of how their families suffered. Today, those same residents live and laugh and have babies and visit ruin pubs.

Load More Replies...
Load More Comments
Popular on Bored Panda
Popular on Bored Panda
User Submissions
Also on Bored Panda
Also on Bored Panda