Global warming is fake news, Tupac is still alive, and the American military is experimenting on aliens and their spacecraft in Area 51. Poke your finger at a random object near you and chances are it’s somehow involved in a conspiracy theory. They’re that common.

July 20th will mark the 51st anniversary of the first human steps on the moon, so what better way to celebrate it than with a theory that rejects the lunar landings in the first place? The best one came in February 2019. Then, a comedy writer from Australia, David Hughes, turned to Twitter to share his thoughts on the subject and raised quite a few interesting points. Check them out.

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“I decided to do the moon landing tweets because the concept was funny to me, I liked the idea of poking fun at conspiracy theorists by being one of them,” David told Bored Panda.

And he did an awesome job. The writer sounded just those people who have no idea what they’re talking about. Sadly, not everyone got the parody.

“From the feedback I get from people who don’t follow me I think most [of them] missed the point,” David said. “But that’s fine.”

The Apollo 11 mission was one of the most astonishing achievements in human history. It is estimated that 530 million TV viewers watched U.S. astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin take their steps on the moon. Afterward, the two men and third crew member Michael Collins safely returned to Earth and landed in the Pacific Ocean.

However, no wonder some people thought Hughes was for real. There still are plenty of folks who think the “giant leap for mankind” was a hoax the U.S. government had staged to win the space race against the Soviet Union.

Most of the deniers highlight the perceived anomalies in the images transmitted back to Earth from the moon’s lunar surface. “With few exceptions, the same arguments just keep coming up over and over again,” Rick Fienberg, the press officer for the American Astronomical Society, who holds a Ph.D. in astronomy, told HISTORY. Fienberg has some first-hand knowledge of this: Nearly 40 years ago, he debated with one of the first prominent moon-landing deniers, Bill Kaysing, on TV.

“About 400,000 scientists, engineers, technologists, machinists, electricians, worked on the Apollo program,” Fienberg said.
“If in fact the main motivation for believing in the moon hoax that is you don’t trust the government, you don’t trust our leaders, you don’t trust authority, how can you feel that 400,000 people would keep their mouths shut for 50 years? It’s just implausible.”

If you still need proof, here’s a good article that debunks the most popular claims conspiracy theorists use to question the moon landing.

Most people really enjoyed David’s thread

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