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Person Attends A Job Interview But Leaves After An Hour Waiting In Vain, 20 People Online Tell Similar Tales
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People, Social Issues1 month ago

Person Attends A Job Interview But Leaves After An Hour Waiting In Vain, 20 People Online Tell Similar Tales

The internet is full of articles on how not to fail an interview when you apply for a job, what to do if you want to make a good impression on recruiters and employer representatives, and what could happen if you don’t follow these tips.

On the other hand, materials about what to do are much less common if it is the employer who behaves completely unprofessionally, and the candidate themselves can become a valuable asset for the company. Yes, these cases are less common, but they also happen.

Like, for example, with this hospital job candidate, whose post on the Reddit Antiwork community received nearly 59K upvotes and about 1.2K comments in just a few days, and many of the comments contained similar stories from other people.

More info: Reddit

The Original Poster came to the job interview assigned to 10 AM

Image source: c***my_devil_doll

Actually, the Original Poster’s story is just a note they left in the lobby of the hospital after their failed job interview. Failed due to, as the OP themselves note, the unprofessionalism of the potential employer.

Nobody showed up to meet them and the OP left after an hour waiting in vain

So, the OP showed up at the hospital lobby at 9:58 AM (apparently the interview was scheduled for 10 AM), but no one came to meet them. In the end, the candidate waited just over an hour before deciding to leave, leaving the failed employer a note reminding them that “professionalism is a two-way street and their time is also valuable.”

According to the OP, “they could be a valuable asset for the hospital.” Of course, this situation is very unpleasant for any candidate. But could events have developed in a different way? With this question, Bored Panda turned to Olga Kalashnikova, HR Director at DIGIS (an international IT company with headquarters in Milwaukee, Puteau (France), Daugavpils (Latvia) and Larnaca (Cyprus)).

The expert says that the OP could probably make an attempt to clarify the situation themselves

“The candidate lost an hour of time and did not make an attempt to clarify the situation themselves,” says Olga. “They just sat and waited, and based on their behavior, one can draw a hypothetical conclusion about how they saw this situation from their point of view: the recruiter miscalculated the time, they were late and would be invited soon, perhaps thoughts about the unprofessionalism of the employees came into their mind.”

“On the part of the company, placing a candidate in a long wait state can sometimes also indicate that this employer uses provocative recruitment methods. But there are other likely reasons that could take place: force majeure with the employee responsible for the interview, force majeure in the unit, as well as the candidate themselves could mix up the time, and maybe even the place of the meeting.”

Image source: Bob n Renee (not the actual photo)

Some employers, in fact, use provocative methods in recruiting which don’t seem so fair

“Personally, I do not support using provocative methods in recruiting, unless we are talking about recruiting personnel for some very specific types of jobs and occupations, where the activity is associated with the safety of something or someone, and I believe that most of the skills can be clarified in more open and humane ways,” says Olga Kalashnikova.

“If this situation arose due to the incompetence of the recruiting department employees, this happens sometimes. The human resource, unlike all resources, has a distinctive characteristic – the unpredictability of behavior, even in the presence of an automated system for accounting for recruiting processes.”

The OP perhaps should have called the contact person to solve the issue

“I believe that the candidate should have called the contact person and clarified the situation, since I consider the employment process to be a mutually beneficial open contractual process, where each participant has equal rights and responsibilities,” Olga continues to comment on this story.

“By showing initiative and clarifying the reason for the long wait situation, the candidate would not only save their time resource, but also get the opportunity to draw more informed conclusions for making a decision on further cooperation with this organization (as opposed to an emotional decision).”

Image source: Marc van der Chijs (not the actual photo)

People in the comments, on the contrary, state that even fifteen minutes of waiting is clearly enough to leave

Most of the commenters on the OP’s post, of course, supported them massively, arguing that it’s generally worth waiting no more than fifteen minutes. According to people in the comments, if the interviewer makes the candidate wait more than this period of time, then they simply express disrespect.

In fact, the situation in which a candidate has to wait a long time for an interview turns out to be rather common. At the very least, many commenters told their own stories in which they felt extremely uncomfortable due to the long wait for a job interview – and some even had to wait several times.

Of course, disrespecting a candidate looks very unprofessional on the part of a potential employer – although, of course, force majeure situations also occur. If something similar has happened to you too, we would like to know your own story. Or just an assessment of this tale from your point of view.

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Hey pandas, what do you think?
S Mi
Community Member
1 month ago

It costs an employer nothing to be respectful and let people know if they are running behind, offer water or coffee, etc.

Jen
Community Member
1 month ago

Exactly, and if there is an unexpected but unavoidable delay to keep you in the loop. Back when I started teaching I had an hour wait for an interview for a long term sub job (covering a maternity leave for most of a school year). When I arrived the secretary apologized and told me the proncipal had just been called to an emergency in the gym but would be with me as soon as it was handled. The principal apologized herself as she ran through to call the child's parents and then back down to the gym. The ambulance arrived a few minutes later and they took about 15 - 20 minutes to get the child in and on the way with the parent that arrived as they were getting them ready. The principal then needed to call the district office and insurance to report the accident before she could start the interview. The secretary kept me updated and got me a coffee and some snacks while I waited. It was the simple act of making sure I knew I wasnt forgotten that made the difference.

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Lori w
Community Member
1 month ago

If the applicant had done this, they'd be immediately dismissed. The interview process shows a lot about the job. I've had my fair share of ridiculous company behavior for a low paying wages. Spoiler alert: if they are rude or disorganized in the interview, that's how it'll be working for them Good ol America. Or interviews where they want people to work for free for an hour & not give the job. Awful.

Julia Purdy
Community Member
1 month ago

OR... hiring you to do a certain position or under certain terms & conditions, then pulling a switcheroo ... guess what, you thought you would be permanent? Well, too bad, we only needed you to meet the seasonal rush so your last shift will be......

Load More Replies...
Octavia Hansen
Community Member
1 month ago

There were job interviews (and even a few Dr appointments) that kept me waiting more than an hour. As a freelance artist, I bill my time at $120/hr. So I made up an invoice charging them for my time. And sometimes I'd tack on extras like gas and coffee. Never expected to be paid but liked the shock value. Sometimes they would call, but I'd schedule an appointment for them to discuss it at a later date.

Julia Purdy
Community Member
1 month ago

I think the doctors' appointments are leading the way. Appointments seem to be made "first come first served" regardless, whether they overbook or the doc is out on the golf course makes no difference. The expectation is set that you will have to wait in line for your appointment. This set the pattern for immature managers and professionals that just want to make sure their own life-work balance is served first, and actual performance is optional

Load More Replies...
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S Mi
Community Member
1 month ago

It costs an employer nothing to be respectful and let people know if they are running behind, offer water or coffee, etc.

Jen
Community Member
1 month ago

Exactly, and if there is an unexpected but unavoidable delay to keep you in the loop. Back when I started teaching I had an hour wait for an interview for a long term sub job (covering a maternity leave for most of a school year). When I arrived the secretary apologized and told me the proncipal had just been called to an emergency in the gym but would be with me as soon as it was handled. The principal apologized herself as she ran through to call the child's parents and then back down to the gym. The ambulance arrived a few minutes later and they took about 15 - 20 minutes to get the child in and on the way with the parent that arrived as they were getting them ready. The principal then needed to call the district office and insurance to report the accident before she could start the interview. The secretary kept me updated and got me a coffee and some snacks while I waited. It was the simple act of making sure I knew I wasnt forgotten that made the difference.

Load More Replies...
Lori w
Community Member
1 month ago

If the applicant had done this, they'd be immediately dismissed. The interview process shows a lot about the job. I've had my fair share of ridiculous company behavior for a low paying wages. Spoiler alert: if they are rude or disorganized in the interview, that's how it'll be working for them Good ol America. Or interviews where they want people to work for free for an hour & not give the job. Awful.

Julia Purdy
Community Member
1 month ago

OR... hiring you to do a certain position or under certain terms & conditions, then pulling a switcheroo ... guess what, you thought you would be permanent? Well, too bad, we only needed you to meet the seasonal rush so your last shift will be......

Load More Replies...
Octavia Hansen
Community Member
1 month ago

There were job interviews (and even a few Dr appointments) that kept me waiting more than an hour. As a freelance artist, I bill my time at $120/hr. So I made up an invoice charging them for my time. And sometimes I'd tack on extras like gas and coffee. Never expected to be paid but liked the shock value. Sometimes they would call, but I'd schedule an appointment for them to discuss it at a later date.

Julia Purdy
Community Member
1 month ago

I think the doctors' appointments are leading the way. Appointments seem to be made "first come first served" regardless, whether they overbook or the doc is out on the golf course makes no difference. The expectation is set that you will have to wait in line for your appointment. This set the pattern for immature managers and professionals that just want to make sure their own life-work balance is served first, and actual performance is optional

Load More Replies...
Load More Comments
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