Bored Panda works better on our iPhone app
Continue in app Continue in browser

BoredPanda Add post form topAdd Post
Tooltip close

The Bored Panda iOS app is live! Fight boredom with iPhones and iPads here.

Boss Insists Employees Work Until The Last Minute, Gets Exactly That As They Stop Responding After Hours And On The Weekends
587

Boss Insists Employees Work Until The Last Minute, Gets Exactly That As They Stop Responding After Hours And On The Weekends

ADVERTISEMENT

There are strict bosses who make no exceptions to their rules and then there are toxic ones who bend them every chance they get only to exploit their workers.

Recently, Reddit user Gloglibologna submitted a post to the platform’s ‘Malicious Compliance‘ community, telling a story about a manager in their company that falls into the latter category.

The man demanded the employees stay at the office until the very end of their work hours, no matter whether or not they could actually do anything, but at the same time expected them to put in extra effort during their free time as well.

As you might guess, it didn’t take long before everyone grew sick and tired of these double standards. Continue scrolling to learn how Gloglibologna and their colleagues responded.

RELATED:

    This boss refused to allow his employees to leave the office even a couple of minutes early

    Image credits: Ono Kosuki (not the actual photo)

    So they devised a plan to give him a taste of his own medicine



    ADVERTISEMENT

    It drove the boss nuts

    But there really wasn’t anything he could do about it

    Image credits: Gloglibologna

    If we take a look at the 12 traits the Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) thinks bad bosses have in common, we would notice multiple features that, at least from what we see in this post, fit the VP at Gloglibologna’s office.

    The invite-only organization comprised of the world’s most successful entrepreneurs aged 40 and younger, believes that a one-size-fits-all approach to management, lack of empathy, and being focused on blame, rather than solutions and support (among other things) are the defining characteristics of lousy leaders.

    And people do, in fact, often leave bosses, not companies. Even before they clear out their desk.

    While much has been written about the Great Resignation, a new term has emerged to describe an increasingly common alternative to resigning, called quiet quitting. Driven by many of the same underlying causes as actual resignations, this concept refers to opting out of tasks beyond one’s assigned duties and/or becoming less psychologically invested in work.

    ADVERTISEMENT

    To put it simply, quiet quitters continue to fulfill their primary responsibilities, but they’re less willing to engage in activities known as citizenship behaviors: no more staying late, showing up early, or attending non-mandatory meetings.

    Gallup found that quiet quitters make up at least 50% of the U.S. workforce, and probably even more.

    During the second quarter of 2022, the proportion of engaged workers stood at 32% but the proportion of actively disengaged increased to 18%. The ratio of these two groups is now 1.8 to 1, the lowest in almost a decade.

    The overall decline is thought to be especially related to clarity of expectations, opportunities to learn and grow, feeling cared about, and a connection to the organization’s mission or purpose, signaling a growing disconnect between employees and their employers.

    So no wonder there were so many people who related to Gloglibologna in the comment section below their post.

    Adrian Marsh, a career coach and regional director at Personal Career Management, which is recognized as the UK’s leading provider of bespoke career management and outplacement services for both organizations and individuals, told Bored Panda that, “a desire to work somewhere where they feel truly valued and appreciated is often listed as an important driver by [our] clients who are looking to change roles and on the other side of the coin, feeling unappreciated is often cited as a reason by clients who for leaving their last role,” Marsh said.

    “Our sense of being valued as an employee can be diminished in multiple ways – e.g. a lack of appreciation or positive feedback about our work from managers, a feeling of being ‘taken for granted’, expected to consistently work beyond our contracted hours, being passed over for promotion without clarity as to why this is the case, unfairness, being expected to make sacrifices which affect our personal lives without this being acknowledged or compensated, not being awarded a payrise when perhaps others we perceive as less deserving have been given one.”

    ADVERTISEMENT

    Marsh also pointed out that sometimes there can be a disconnect between what we see as being important in the way the role is conducted and what is measured and therefore noticed by the organization. “‘Burnout’ can also be a factor affecting people who may previously have loved their jobs and see them as vital, if the workload has become unsustainable such that work is taking a toll on their physical or mental wellbeing,” he added.

    According to the career coach, if employees end up disappointed with their job, they should start looking at their predicament from an analytical point of view instead of simply hoping that everything will go back to normal.

    “The first step and one we can start on at any time is to develop a clear understanding of what really matters to us about work and build on these factors to develop some clear career goals,” Marsh explained. “Our careers belong to us … and we are the only ones who experience [them], so we should not expect, or want, anyone else to do this for us.”

    “To improve matters within a current role, make sure that your job description and objectives are clear, that you know what is expected of you, and how success will be measured,” he continued. “It’s also important that your job description, objectives and success metrics are realistic and accurately reflect the situation on the ground. If not, it’s good to have a discussion with your manager about refining the goals and objectives or gaining extra support.”

    ADVERTISEMENT

    Another good way to improve job satisfaction is what Marsh calls job-crafting. “Employees often underestimate the scope that exists for adjusting their current role,” he highlighted. “The tasks it encompasses could be adjusted, there could be scope for creating more interaction with different teams, or you might want to try rethinking the purpose of the role – something that can be very powerful. The key to success with job-crafting is finding a win-win – identifying a gain for the organization as well as yourself. That gain would likely be the starting point for any discussion with your manager.”

    Once you have a clearer picture of what you want from your career, how your current role fits within that picture, and how you’d like to see it evolve, you’re in a great place to have a career conversation with your manager. “This may take place as part of an annual review – even better if it can take place outside of discussions about pay and performance, thinking more specifically about your career ambitions and development aims,” Marsh said.

    Thinking slightly longer term, “it’s important to recognize that achieving your goals will not just follow automatically from performing your job well. The image that our peers, colleagues, managers, and customers have of us, and ensuring that the folks whose opinions or impressions can affect our job prospects know about all the good stuff we have done are arguably (and some might say unfortunately) even more important factors and recognizing when change may be needed is also important.”

    ADVERTISEMENT

    Extreme cases aside, quitting your job isn’t something you want to do on the spot. Sometimes, even a little bit of malicious compliance can be enough.

    As the story went viral, people expressed their support for the original poster (OP), and some said they also had similar experiences

    ADVERTISEMENT
















    Share on Facebook
    Rokas Laurinavičius

    Rokas Laurinavičius

    Writer, BoredPanda staff

    Read more »

    Rokas is a writer at Bored Panda with a BA in Communication. After working for a sculptor, he fell in love with visual storytelling and enjoys covering everything from TV shows (any Sopranos fans out there?) to photography. Throughout his years in Bored Panda, over 300 million people have read the posts he's written, which is probably more than he could count to.

    Read less »
    Rokas Laurinavičius

    Rokas Laurinavičius

    Writer, BoredPanda staff

    Rokas is a writer at Bored Panda with a BA in Communication. After working for a sculptor, he fell in love with visual storytelling and enjoys covering everything from TV shows (any Sopranos fans out there?) to photography. Throughout his years in Bored Panda, over 300 million people have read the posts he's written, which is probably more than he could count to.

    Gabija Palšytė

    Gabija Palšytė

    Author, BoredPanda staff

    Read more »

    Gabija is a photo editor at Bored Panda. Before joining the team, she achieved a Professional Bachelor degree in Photography and has been working as a freelance photographer since. She also has a special place in her heart for film photography, movies and nature.

    Read less »

    Gabija Palšytė

    Gabija Palšytė

    Author, BoredPanda staff

    Gabija is a photo editor at Bored Panda. Before joining the team, she achieved a Professional Bachelor degree in Photography and has been working as a freelance photographer since. She also has a special place in her heart for film photography, movies and nature.

    What do you think?
    Add photo comments
    POST
    ssnx01 avatar
    Chich
    Community Member
    1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

    When younger and dumber I often stayed late at work. Then I got 'spoken to' for coming in a few minutes late one day. I pointed out that I was spening more time at work than required. Made no never mind to them. So, no more extra free work. Was good in that it woke me up.

    luyendao avatar
    Lu
    Community Member
    1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

    It’s sad people only notice what they see as negatives, instead of everything else.

    Load More Replies...
    luyendao avatar
    Lu
    Community Member
    1 year ago (edited) DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

    Executives who earn much more, get egregious severance packages if they leave - somehow expect people who make less money to care as much as they do. Hmmmm

    christophersatko avatar
    Christopher Satko
    Community Member
    1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

    corporate America = greed.example how can wal mart pay 4 billion for a football team and pay the hourly workers so little? the wal mart children that inherited that $ never worked a day in their lives. believe it or not I consider myself very middle of the road politically. just sick of all the evil. yes, greed is evil.

    Load More Replies...
    rodfergie avatar
    Roddfergg
    Community Member
    1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

    I never understood this when I managed. As long as you're working your 40 I don't care. Unless your job is specifically to be available to customers during specific hours, It doesn't really matter if you work 10 hours one day and 6 the next, as long as you are doing your work.

    mattiagiambirtonenocturn9x avatar
    Mattia Giambirtone (nocturn9x)
    Community Member
    8 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

    My manager doesn't even care that I work my full 20 hours (I'm part-time because of university). If I work 17, and the work gets done, I can put down 20 and he doesn't care (his words). That's a cool a*s manager if you ask me. The implied rule is of course not to abuse it, but this flexibility has made me want to go above and beyond when necessary, for example regarding overtime (which for a college student isn't exactly a given)

    Load More Replies...
    Load More Comments
    ssnx01 avatar
    Chich
    Community Member
    1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

    When younger and dumber I often stayed late at work. Then I got 'spoken to' for coming in a few minutes late one day. I pointed out that I was spening more time at work than required. Made no never mind to them. So, no more extra free work. Was good in that it woke me up.

    luyendao avatar
    Lu
    Community Member
    1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

    It’s sad people only notice what they see as negatives, instead of everything else.

    Load More Replies...
    luyendao avatar
    Lu
    Community Member
    1 year ago (edited) DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

    Executives who earn much more, get egregious severance packages if they leave - somehow expect people who make less money to care as much as they do. Hmmmm

    christophersatko avatar
    Christopher Satko
    Community Member
    1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

    corporate America = greed.example how can wal mart pay 4 billion for a football team and pay the hourly workers so little? the wal mart children that inherited that $ never worked a day in their lives. believe it or not I consider myself very middle of the road politically. just sick of all the evil. yes, greed is evil.

    Load More Replies...
    rodfergie avatar
    Roddfergg
    Community Member
    1 year ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

    I never understood this when I managed. As long as you're working your 40 I don't care. Unless your job is specifically to be available to customers during specific hours, It doesn't really matter if you work 10 hours one day and 6 the next, as long as you are doing your work.

    mattiagiambirtonenocturn9x avatar
    Mattia Giambirtone (nocturn9x)
    Community Member
    8 months ago DotsCreated by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

    My manager doesn't even care that I work my full 20 hours (I'm part-time because of university). If I work 17, and the work gets done, I can put down 20 and he doesn't care (his words). That's a cool a*s manager if you ask me. The implied rule is of course not to abuse it, but this flexibility has made me want to go above and beyond when necessary, for example regarding overtime (which for a college student isn't exactly a given)

    Load More Replies...
    Load More Comments
    You May Like
    Related on Bored Panda
    Related on Bored Panda
    Trending on Bored Panda
    Also on Bored Panda