Recently, a Florida teacher said she was fired after refusing to give students credit for homework they never turned in, and it reignited the ongoing debate about education in the United States. Social studies teacher Diane Tirado, 52, said the situation disregarded the “No Zero” policy. Her former employer, West Gate K-8 School in Port St. Lucie, however, had a different story.

“I was not allowed to give anything lower than a 50,” Tirado told The Post.

For the first assignment of the semester, Tirado asked her students to keep a journal in the same way a 15th-century explorer would. For two weeks, they were required to take down notes about historical events and draw maps in what the teacher referred to as an “explorer’s notebook.”

“I got called down to the principal’s office because parents were not happy with me,” she said. “It was ruining my life for weeks.” According to the teacher of 17-years, it was during one such visit to the principal’s office that she learned about the “No Zero” policy.

After some students in her class didn’t hand the homework in, however, she said she didn’t think they deserved any credit. “I’m used to kids not handing in work… but then chasing them until the report cards are in to make sure they make it up. But I don’t give a grade for nothing.”

Tirado was fired on the 14th of September, less than two months after getting hired at the school. She said that because of her probationary period at the school there wasn’t any official cause mentioned in the letter from the principal. But the teacher said she knew why. “I loudly bucked the system. I refused to do their policy. I guess you would call that defiance.”

Talking to KSAT, a spokesperson of the school said, “Ms. Tirado was released from her duties as an instructor because her performance was deemed sub-standard and her interactions with students, staff, and parents lacked professionalism and created a toxic culture on the school’s campus. During her brief time of employment at West Gate, the school fielded numerous student and parent complaints as well as concerns from colleagues. Based on new information shared with school administrators, an investigation of possible physical abuse is underway.” The spokesperson also added the schools grading policy, claiming that there isn’t a policy prohibiting teachers from giving students a zero for missed assignments.

Here’s the scale published by West Gate. It outlines a 10-point range for each letter grade:

A = 90 to 100
B = 80 to 89
C = 70-79
D = 60-69
F = 50-59

A zero is noted on the scale for work not attempted or work that is incomplete.

Tirado, however, said the policy outlined in the West Gate student and parent handbook in bright red capital letters states, “NO ZERO’S – LOWEST POSSIBLE GRADE IS 50%,” according to an image she provided to The Post.

After the story went viral, lots of people (including teachers) were quick to share their opinions. Continue scrolling to read the rest, and tell us your thoughts in the comments.

Social studies teacher Diane Tirado, 52, said she was fired for refusing to follow the “No Zero” policy

Image credits: Diane Tirado

She did not even have the time to say goodbye to her students, so she left this message on a whiteboard instead:

Image credits: Diane Tirado

For the first assignment of the semester, Tirado asked her students to keep a journal in the same way a 15th-century explorer would

After some students in her class didn’t hand the homework in, however, she said she didn’t think they deserved any credit

Her story reignited the ongoing debate about education in the United States

She even went to state her opinion in the news

Image credits: Diane Tirado

After that, many people (including teachers) were quick to respond

What do you think?