Imagine the surprise you would feel going through your old stuff and coming across an old computer with the ability to resume a game you saved roughly 30 years ago. That’s what happened to John Pfaff, a law professor from Fordham University in New York. In his parent’s house, he discovered an old and dusty Apple IIe computer and, to his surprise, found he was still able to play his childhood games. Apple IIe (the letter ‘e’ stands for ‘enhanced’), the third model in the Apple II series, was introduced in January 1983 and originally sold for $1395. The IIe had a 64k RAM built-in and introduced the ability to use both upper and lower case letters, allowing full functionality of the Shift and Caps Lock keys. The computer also included new keyboard features – directional cursor keys, Tab and Delete keys. The computer used the original floppy disks which had a storage capacity of approximately 80 kilobytes. The Apple IIe served its purpose well and became commonplace in many schools and homes, before all models of this computer were discontinued in November 1993.

More info on John’s Twitter thread.

When John turned on the computer, which hadn’t been used for three decades, the option to resume a previous game popped up on the screen

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Turns out, John had saved his progress for Adventureland – a game released back in 1978, which was played by using two simple word commands. Luckily, John was still able to the game, which he must have saved some thirty years ago. ‘Neuromancer’ (a game loosely based on the 1989 book by William Gibson) along with Millionaire (a trivia game) and Olympic decathlon (published by Microsoft in 1980) were also revisited by John. The games were available on floppy discs, about which John tweeted: “My dad typed up labels for all my floppies, which is really sweet to remember. He was so thorough that he even included… who hacked the games. (I’m the only person in my immediate family who went to law school.)” He later added: “Also, in the days before the Cloud, kids, you had to make sure you backed up your backups, [because] those floppies could betray you. My dad wrote a computer financial modeling textbook. He… wasn’t joking [about] backups.”

John was eager to show his kids what ‘retro’ truly meant

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

The most important discovery, however, was not the disks but a letter John’s father wrote in 1986, who sadly passed away last year

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

Image credits: JohnFPfaff

John was very happy to find that many people appreciated his post and tweeted: “Ok, my kids won’t care why I didn’t go to bed when they wake up at dawn tomorrow (well, today). I’m so happy that this thread seems to have brought back so many good memories for so many [people]. That’s not how my TL usually is, and it’s been a fantastic chance of pace.”