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Woman Shares Advice On Handling Covid-19 Once You Get It, And Her Thread Goes Viral
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People, Social Issues1 year ago

Woman Shares Advice On Handling Covid-19 Once You Get It, And Her Thread Goes Viral Interview With Author

Covid-19 is like politics—everyone has an opinion and believes that theirs is the only correct one. So it’s no wonder that with so many facts and ‘facts’ flying about, people get confused and lost in the info storm surrounding the pandemic. An overabundance of information can be just as bad as a lack of it, after all.

One person who tried to cut through the noise and help others get to the truth by streamlining coronavirus-related info was Megan McNally. She shared how to handle Covid once you’ve got it and her Twitter thread went viral with a massive 198k likes and 61k retweets. The writer, living in the borough of Queens, in New York City, went through some basics and gave her recommendations on what she believes people who catch the coronavirus should do.

Megan told Bored Panda that her symptoms first showed up as what she thought was a head cold, with a stuffy nose, as well as a sore throat. “My parents were experiencing the same, and I wanted to be extra cautious and see if it might be Covid, even if my symptoms didn’t line up exactly.”

Check out our interviews with Megan, as well as with a Covid ICU nurse who makes helpful coronavirus-related videos, goes by the name Galactic Gardener online, and told us what helped her while recovering from Covid.

Megan shared some spot-on tips on what you should do if you get Covid-19

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Here’s a video showing how to make a pillow to put under your stomach to help you breathe better

Megan continued with her advice

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

Image credits: MeganMcNal

“I was not expecting the thread to get this much attention at all. When I first tested positive, I felt a gigantic amount of fear (for good reason) and wanted other people to see what they could immediately do to take care of themselves in an accessible way,” Megan shared with Bored Panda.

According to her, even though she’s already had Covid-19, she still plans to get vaccinated “as soon as possible” because of the possibility of reinfection.

“I hope other people stay safe and think the same! I’m also so thankful for all of the healthcare workers and nurses who have pitched in on this thread; I am not a doctor by any means so it means a lot to have so many resources coming together. If my thread can help just one person feel better or less alone, that’s all I’ve wanted.”

Among the things that Megan recommends is taking plenty of vitamins and minerals and getting lots of rest. She also suggests proning (i.e. lying on your stomach), letting fresh air into your home, and getting gear like a thermometer, humidifier, and a pulse oximeter. Let’s go through these point by point, shall we?

According to researchers, proning can help temporarily elevate oxygenation levels. However, it’s not yet confirmed that it gets rid of the need for ventilators in extreme cases.

Taking vitamins and sleeping lots are obvious but necessary bits of advice. You can’t expect to recover from any illness quickly if you spend all day glued to your laptop or phone while in bed. Make your rest count. Just remember that vitamins aren’t a valid alternative for a proper diet.

And while vitamin D can be great during the Winter months, getting some natural sunlight is wonderful, too, if you can do so without exposing others to your infection.

Ventilating your home is also self-explanatory. It helps protect other people who live in your household while also giving you fresh air to enjoy.

Meanwhile, what Megan says about using a pulse oximeter to measure oxygen levels is mostly true. While different patients can have different baselines, the rule of thumb is that if your oxygen saturation drops below 95 percent, you should contact a health professional.

Megan’s also right that zinc can (the keyword being ‘can’) help with recovery from Covid-19. That’s because it has antiviral properties. While zinc deficiency has been linked to a greater risk of viral infections.

Overall—well done with the tips, Megan!

Other people pitched in with their own insights

Image credits: webbychameleon

Image credits: FroggieAeon

Image credits: FroggieAeon

Image credits: BaileyKingGamer

Image credits: heyyitzzcindyy

Meanwhile, Covid ICU nurse Galactic Gardener told Bored Panda that proning was one of the things that brought her relief during her “Covid journey” and she greatly recommends it for other patients.

“Studies have shown that early proning, often as soon as patients arrive at the ER reduces oxygen requirements, and improves outcomes. A simple maneuver can get people off of their back ( which contributes to PNA and eventually ARDS), and allowed fuller lung expansion! I think, given that it is one of the few things statistically proven to improve Covid-19 outcomes that people should ask their doctor about trying it! Free and as easy as a simple position change,” she said, adding that you can find a guide for proning at home right here.

The ICU nurse also said that she took vitamin C and D and Zinc early on during her Covid infection to help boost her immune system function. “Other things that improve overall lung health were also vital to my recovery from Covid! Focused deep breathing and utilizing an incentive spirometer daily were also steps I took to improve my lung capacity and keep them nice and open and clear! There were days that I could feel them trying to close at the bases and become painful, deep breathing really helped me.”

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A.M. Pierre
Community Member
1 year ago

The gastrointestinal bits can get lost in the shuffle, but that's how mine mainly manifested - as 4 days of the worst case of the runs I've had in my life. It was super bizarre - I actually didn't connect the two until way later when the doctors started saying nausea and diarrhea could be involved. The lung-related issues weren't too bad at all for me, as I had occasional random coughs (like maybe once every couple of hours) that came out of nowhere but were so deep they made my face hurt, then there a low fever that popped up then vanished a couple times, and a few moments of feeling exhausted and then feeling fine again a couple minutes later. It literally was four days of "I think I might be fighting off a cold but man it's a bizarre cold" alongside "WHAT DID I EAT?!" and then poof! vanished overnight. That's what makes Covid so scary, IMO - it's so completely unpredictable in how it will affect you.

Cori
Community Member
1 year ago

I have a friend who might be on oxygen for the rest of her life. This stuff is no joke!

Crochet lady
Community Member
1 year ago

It's truly sad we have to rely on first hand knowledge of those affected rather than our government health agency because they can't be bothered to inform us of what to do, how to respond or what to expect when we encounter the disease. I am grateful to people for sharing their experience with us but we shouldn't have to go to social media to get medical advice. Our government has failed us.

Uncommon Boston
Community Member
1 year ago

CDC has good information. Our state public covid hot line was even better. I usually check the Mayo Clinic site as well. Our governor was fantastic. He just made it happen.

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A.M. Pierre
Community Member
1 year ago

The gastrointestinal bits can get lost in the shuffle, but that's how mine mainly manifested - as 4 days of the worst case of the runs I've had in my life. It was super bizarre - I actually didn't connect the two until way later when the doctors started saying nausea and diarrhea could be involved. The lung-related issues weren't too bad at all for me, as I had occasional random coughs (like maybe once every couple of hours) that came out of nowhere but were so deep they made my face hurt, then there a low fever that popped up then vanished a couple times, and a few moments of feeling exhausted and then feeling fine again a couple minutes later. It literally was four days of "I think I might be fighting off a cold but man it's a bizarre cold" alongside "WHAT DID I EAT?!" and then poof! vanished overnight. That's what makes Covid so scary, IMO - it's so completely unpredictable in how it will affect you.

Cori
Community Member
1 year ago

I have a friend who might be on oxygen for the rest of her life. This stuff is no joke!

Crochet lady
Community Member
1 year ago

It's truly sad we have to rely on first hand knowledge of those affected rather than our government health agency because they can't be bothered to inform us of what to do, how to respond or what to expect when we encounter the disease. I am grateful to people for sharing their experience with us but we shouldn't have to go to social media to get medical advice. Our government has failed us.

Uncommon Boston
Community Member
1 year ago

CDC has good information. Our state public covid hot line was even better. I usually check the Mayo Clinic site as well. Our governor was fantastic. He just made it happen.

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Load More Comments
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