Graphic designer Noelle Cress got seriously fed up with racism deniers, especially in the light of the George Floyd protests and Black Lives Matter movement.

To separate facts from fiction and point out just how flawed some of their arguments are, she compiled 5 common logical fallacies to avoid. Laid all out in black on white, these fallacies point out why commonly used examples when talking about racism and police brutality just don’t work.

It turns out, every fallacy has a smart name too, like “red herring” or “straw man,” and with the help of easy-to-read infographics, we now know which examples are never gonna work in a fair and respectful debate.

More info: Instagram | NoelleCress.com

Noelle listed these common logical fallacies to avoid for a productive discussion

Image credits: noelle.cress

After she shared the post, the common fallacies quickly spread throughout social media

Image credits: noelle.cress

Image credits: noelle.cress

Bored Panda reached out to Noelle Cress, the graphic designer behind the viral logical fallacy graphics, to find out more about this amazing project. Noelle said she saw a lot of the same flawed arguments being made over and over again on social media.

“I also saw a lot of emotionally-charged, frustrated people arguing with each other in comment sections who kept repeating their own arguments while completely missing the point of the other person’s argument.”

“As a result,” she said, “people usually left those debates more thoroughly convinced of the opinion they already had and less willing to engage in reasonable conversation in the future.”

Image credits: noelle.cress

Image credits: noelle.cress

Image credits: noelle.cress

The designer hopes that being open to new information and changing your opinion will become normalized. “Acknowledging that your previous opinion of something was wrong based on new information is an important part of personal growth and shows maturity.”

Noelle believes that every one of us needs to be more critical towards our news sources, both TV and social media.

Image credits: noelle.cress

Image credits: noelle.cress

Image credits: noelle.cress

Image credits: noelle.cress

With half a million people turning out in 550 places across the US, the Black Lives Matter protests reached their peak on June 6. Recent polls showed that around 15 to 26 million people in the country have participated in demonstrations over the death of George Floyd and other victims.

The actual number of people who protested according to polls are as follows: 15 million on June 4-10 (Pew), 18 million on June 11-15 (N.O.R.C.), 23 million on June 12-22 (Civis Analytics), and 26 million on June 8-14 (Kaiser Family Foundation). The participation in the recent Black Lives Matter protests surpassed the Women’s March of 2017, which had a turnout of about three million to five million people on a single day.

Another factor showing just how important the protests have been for the country’s recent history is how widespread the movement was. Kenneth Andrews, a sociology professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, told the New York Times: “The geographic spread of protest is a really important characteristic and helps signal the depth and breadth of a movement’s support.”

And this is what people had to say about them