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People Say Tech Mogul’s Attempt At Reversing His Age Has Given Him An “Uncanny Valley” Look
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People Say Tech Mogul’s Attempt At Reversing His Age Has Given Him An “Uncanny Valley” Look

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A man who has “hacked” his biology is reportedly spending millions of dollars every year to reverse the effects of aging, stunning people with his most recent procedure known as “Project Baby Face”.

Bryan Johnson is an American entrepreneur, better known as a “biohacker”, who has received media attention for his anti-aging attempts that he has called “Project Blueprint”.

The CEO is now taking part in a reportedly intense experimental medical program, costing him an eye-watering $2 million per year to try and reverse his biological age.

Bryan Johnson spends millions of dollars every year to reverse the effects of aging

Image credits: bryanjohnson_

Bryan shared an update 10 months after starting his quest for eternal youth

Image credits: bryan_johnson

Taking to his X account (formerly known as Twitter), the 46-year-old showed the eerie results of his new “project baby face” by posting a selfie on Monday (27 November).

He wrote: “I got really skinny the first year of Blueprint and lost a lot of facial volume.

“We started Project Baby Face 10 months ago. How are we doing?”

In 2021, Bryan announced the anti-aging Project Blueprint, claiming to have improved certain biomarkers

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Image credits: bryanjohnson_

Image credits: bryanjohnson_

Bryan’s new selfie followed a previous X post where he had announced: “Hearing my face is not an 18 yr old; commencing project Baby Face.

“In case you’re wondering, we’ve focused on maximally slowing my speed of aging, now at .76 (ranking #1 on leaderboard).

“Caloric restriction (25%) being a primary driver, which also has the harmless side effect of facial volume loss.”

Image credits: bryanjohnson_

We are unclear on what these numbers suggest; however, these might be explained through the Rejunevation Olympics website, which the businessman linked in the post.

“Rejuvenation Olympics was conceived by Bryan Johnson and Oliver Zolman, MD in order to have a public forum to share protocols and validated results for age rejuvenation,” the website reads.

The website further states that certain types of data analysis, lab testing, and algorithms are used to, in essence, reverse people’s aging process.

As part of his Blueprint project, Bryan wears a baseball cap that shoots red light into his scalp

Image credits: bryanjohnson_

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Bryan’s scary results as displayed in his new selfie sparked mixed reactions online.

“It’s astounding that you can’t see yourself the way others see you,” a person commented.

Another X user wrote: “He literally looks his age. He looks tired. I don’t see what the hype is.”

“It’s still like uncanny valley,” an additional critic penned.

While others said the billionaire looked like “there’s a really unsettling aura to him”, and that he appeared to be “synthetic”-looking, others shared their admiration as a person wrote: “You’re gorgeous, angel.”

The biohacker is thought to have undergone a series of plasma transfusions with his son as one of his donors

 

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A post shared by Zero (@bryanjohnson_)

 

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A post shared by Zero (@bryanjohnson_)

A separate individual chimed in: “Honestly you look great, drop the skincare routine, king.”

In 2021, Bryan announced the anti-aging Project Blueprint, claiming to have improved certain biomarkers via dietary practices including caloric restriction and intermittent fasting, large numbers of supplements and medications, a strict sleep schedule, and frequent diagnostic testing, among other methods, Bloomberg reported.

The controversial billionaire also reportedly underwent a series of six monthly 1-liter plasma transfusions with his son as the donor for one of the transfusions, later announcing he wouldn’t repeat the process due to the lack of benefits.

Bryan has suggested that death may not be inevitable

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Image credits: bryanjohnson_

Bryan’s experiments have often been scrutinized and debunked by experts in fields related to aging, such as Moshe Szyf, a professor of pharmacology and therapeutics at McGill University, who told Fortune: “It is unclear, however, whether we have yet the knowledge on how to do this.

“It seems that Bryan Johnson is applying a tour de force of anything suggested to affect longevity and uses a barrage of tests to examine functional changes.

“It is also clear that changes need to be personalized.”

Some people were left impressed by his procedure and wanted to follow in his footsteps

Image credits: bryanjohnson_

In September, the tech mogul revealed that he had spent three years perfecting ways of seemingly living forever.

He admitted that he had splurged more than $4 million developing the questionable Blueprint life-extension project.

Image credits: Bryan Johnson

The system consists of outsourcing every decision involving his body to a team of doctors, who use data to develop a strict health regimen to reduce Bryan’s biological age.

As a result, the biotech enthusiast has been downing 111 pills every day, wearing a baseball cap that shoots red light into his scalp, collecting his own stool samples, and sleeping with a tiny jet pack attached to his penis to monitor his nighttime erections.

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Image credits: Bryan Johnson

He told Time: “I have, on average, two hours and 12 minutes each night of erection of a certain quality.

“To be age 18, it would be three hours and 30 minutes.”

Nighttime erections, Bryan told the publication, are “a biological age marker for your sexual function,” one that also has implications for cardiovascular fitness.

You can watch Bryan’s reasoning below:

While Bryan suggested that death may not be inevitable, experts have strongly disagreed, with Dr. Pinchas Cohen, dean of the Leonard Davis School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California, telling the publication that “death is not optional; it’s written into our genes”.

The doctor reportedly emphasized that living longer in the future is certainly possible: over the course of the 20th century, human life expectancy rose from around 50 to more than 80.

However, he explained: “There’s absolutely no evidence that it’s possible, and there’s absolutely no technology right now that even suggests that we’re heading that way.”

Bryan’s experiments divided people’s opinions

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