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Woman Explains How Millennials Are Systematically Infantilized By Previous Generations And It’s Spot On
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People, Social Issues2 years ago

Woman Explains How Millennials Are Systematically Infantilized By Previous Generations And It’s Spot On

According to the Pew Research Center, today roughly 24% of young adults could be deemed financially independent by 22 years old, compared to 32% in 1980. It was also found that almost half (45%) the adults between the ages of 18 to 29 receive financial help from their parents. Pew Research Center further reports that young adults today are staying in school longer and marrying and establishing their own households later compared to the previous generations.

While it’s easy to jump to reductive claims and say that the current generation is lazy and entitled, the financial independence and other adulthood markers are not so easy to reach for today’s youth. The point was proven perfectly by a young woman on Twitter – Louisa shared her opinion on the so-called adulthood markers. According to her, the system is built to keep people just barely above water while at the same time bullying them for not conforming to the standards set by previous generations. Scroll down below to read Louisa’s tweets and don’t forget to tell us what you think in the comment section.

More info: Twitter

Recently, one woman shared her opinion on the ‘infantilized generation’

Image credits: Can Pac Swire

Louisa argues that today’s young adults are infantilized against their own will and then mocked for not being able to meet the expectations of adulthood. She says that people in power price the youth out of the aforementioned adulthood markers (a house, wedding, nuclear family) and makes them unreachable. Quickly enough, Louisa received praise for her on-point thread, but not everyone was agreeing with her. “Being financially independent is not hard. Pay off your debt. You can easily do this by living without using a credit card and living within your means. Then once your debt is paid off, build wealth. Budgeting will save your life,” one person wrote. Another man argued that the secret is, “kids as soon as you have room in your heart,” and then, “the money works itself out.”

Soon enough, Louisa’s thread on Twitter went viral

Image credits: LouisatheLast

Image credits: LouisatheLast

Image credits: LouisatheLast

Image credits: LouisatheLast

Image credits: LouisatheLast

People chimed in by offering a further extension of Louisa’s list

Image credits: AnonAnemone

Image credits: RealRyanWhorton

Image credits: MadvilNE

Image credits: BigGayYeen

People were particularly annoyed by the forced monetization of one’s hobbies and argued that “any hobbies or sources of enjoyment (i.e playing an instrument, drawing, photography, etc.) [are] only valuable if they are used as a source of income.”

“Don’t forget that the money spent on a said hobby, no matter how small, is a sign of our immaturity and the reason we can’t afford the things they had,” someone added.

People found Louisa’s thread relatable and some even responded with memes

Image credits: MarcCapeMay

Image credits: theladydharma

Image credits: MoriMole

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Monty Glue
Community Member
2 years ago (edited)

Boomer here and I think the article is spot on. We didn't have cell phones, internet, and most of the new electronic miracles back in the day. What we did have is a decent wage, almost free health care, jobs-jobs-jobs that paid real wages and had these weird things they used to call "benefits". Oh yes, and there were pensions so you didn't have to sock away money for your retirement. While interest rates were higher, the cost of housing (and everything else) was WAY cheaper. Examples: gas bill for heat $3.50/month, first cable bill in 1978 was $6.50/month. My grandparents purchased their 1st home in Philadelphia around 1905 for $600. My father purchased my childhood home for $12,000 in 1960. I purchased my 1st home for $49,000 in 1983. My childhood home sold recently for $250,000. See anything wrong with this picture?

Peter Bear
Community Member
2 years ago

Thank you. Lost Generation/Gen Y here (my parents are Boomers and my youngest sister's a millennial, so I'm the 'in-between' that no one bothers to remember exists) and if anything, we have it worse than the millennials. My generation is stuck with all the problems listed above, and we've been stuck there for longer. Saying these same things and having no one listen to us, or even admit that we *are* our own generation. Look, I was born in 1980, and I don't care where your 'arbitrary generational years' are, I'm not a millennial, because I was 20 by the time the millennium happened. But I'm certainly not a Gen Xer either; they're all older than me by a decade. Sorry, got sidetracked there a bit; what I was meaning to say is that you're one of the rare people that not only admits there's a problem, but you want to help fix it. Thanks for that.

Load More Replies...
Alib
Community Member
2 years ago

GenX here and this article is correct. Except! These rules apply to ALL of us. Yes, my generation got a head start. I do have wealthy friends but most of my friends are like me: struggling to keep up and get by every month, and knowing the system is stacked against EVERYone but the wealthy. Many Boomers and Silent Generations are also feeling this pain, if they were working class, if they did not save enough, if they are ill or in an accident (in the U.S., where illness can make you homeless) if they were not rich to begin with. So it's idiotic for anyone to knock Millennials when we are all in the same boat that pits us against each other and is perfectly unbalanced to favor the rich. We need to join forces and take down the systems that harm decent, hardworking people.

Renee Gauthier
Community Member
2 years ago

Gen X was the beginning of the end, thanks to Reagan. I kept wondering when companies would realize that the less they paid their employees, the less money they spent at those companies. However, I didn't count on the same people not worrying about their companies making money, but just gambling with stocks prices & bailing with their golden parachutes. Individual CEOs were making money even as the companies were crashing & burning & laying off people. Then they'd start the next round. I was born in 1963, on the cusp between Boomers & Gen X, so I had a bit of insight on both & was affected somewhat by the financial crisis. I started out okay, then in the late 80's & early 90's, our basic 7% annual raise was changed to 3%. It's now 0%. I did get a pension, but since my salary hasn't gone up much, it won't be much, but I'm still better off than most millenials. However, it wasn't just Boomers who did this. Too many Gen X took the Reagan mythology & greed is good to heart.

Load More Replies...
Hans
Community Member
2 years ago

I find it annoying that political discusions are put under generation tags. This way, it seems it is an issue between younger and older people. In fact, we are looking at political failures of the last 50 or so years.

Peter Bear
Community Member
2 years ago

Unfortunately it is a generational issue, because it's a particular generation of people that were the overwhelming cause of the problem. The postwar 'Baby Boom' generation got what they wanted out of life, but screwed every generation that followed them in the process. And most of them not only won't apologize for it, they blame us for it. Which is patently untrue.

Load More Replies...
Load More Comments
Monty Glue
Community Member
2 years ago (edited)

Boomer here and I think the article is spot on. We didn't have cell phones, internet, and most of the new electronic miracles back in the day. What we did have is a decent wage, almost free health care, jobs-jobs-jobs that paid real wages and had these weird things they used to call "benefits". Oh yes, and there were pensions so you didn't have to sock away money for your retirement. While interest rates were higher, the cost of housing (and everything else) was WAY cheaper. Examples: gas bill for heat $3.50/month, first cable bill in 1978 was $6.50/month. My grandparents purchased their 1st home in Philadelphia around 1905 for $600. My father purchased my childhood home for $12,000 in 1960. I purchased my 1st home for $49,000 in 1983. My childhood home sold recently for $250,000. See anything wrong with this picture?

Peter Bear
Community Member
2 years ago

Thank you. Lost Generation/Gen Y here (my parents are Boomers and my youngest sister's a millennial, so I'm the 'in-between' that no one bothers to remember exists) and if anything, we have it worse than the millennials. My generation is stuck with all the problems listed above, and we've been stuck there for longer. Saying these same things and having no one listen to us, or even admit that we *are* our own generation. Look, I was born in 1980, and I don't care where your 'arbitrary generational years' are, I'm not a millennial, because I was 20 by the time the millennium happened. But I'm certainly not a Gen Xer either; they're all older than me by a decade. Sorry, got sidetracked there a bit; what I was meaning to say is that you're one of the rare people that not only admits there's a problem, but you want to help fix it. Thanks for that.

Load More Replies...
Alib
Community Member
2 years ago

GenX here and this article is correct. Except! These rules apply to ALL of us. Yes, my generation got a head start. I do have wealthy friends but most of my friends are like me: struggling to keep up and get by every month, and knowing the system is stacked against EVERYone but the wealthy. Many Boomers and Silent Generations are also feeling this pain, if they were working class, if they did not save enough, if they are ill or in an accident (in the U.S., where illness can make you homeless) if they were not rich to begin with. So it's idiotic for anyone to knock Millennials when we are all in the same boat that pits us against each other and is perfectly unbalanced to favor the rich. We need to join forces and take down the systems that harm decent, hardworking people.

Renee Gauthier
Community Member
2 years ago

Gen X was the beginning of the end, thanks to Reagan. I kept wondering when companies would realize that the less they paid their employees, the less money they spent at those companies. However, I didn't count on the same people not worrying about their companies making money, but just gambling with stocks prices & bailing with their golden parachutes. Individual CEOs were making money even as the companies were crashing & burning & laying off people. Then they'd start the next round. I was born in 1963, on the cusp between Boomers & Gen X, so I had a bit of insight on both & was affected somewhat by the financial crisis. I started out okay, then in the late 80's & early 90's, our basic 7% annual raise was changed to 3%. It's now 0%. I did get a pension, but since my salary hasn't gone up much, it won't be much, but I'm still better off than most millenials. However, it wasn't just Boomers who did this. Too many Gen X took the Reagan mythology & greed is good to heart.

Load More Replies...
Hans
Community Member
2 years ago

I find it annoying that political discusions are put under generation tags. This way, it seems it is an issue between younger and older people. In fact, we are looking at political failures of the last 50 or so years.

Peter Bear
Community Member
2 years ago

Unfortunately it is a generational issue, because it's a particular generation of people that were the overwhelming cause of the problem. The postwar 'Baby Boom' generation got what they wanted out of life, but screwed every generation that followed them in the process. And most of them not only won't apologize for it, they blame us for it. Which is patently untrue.

Load More Replies...
Load More Comments
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