Mary Phelps Jacob is a big name in the history of women’s apparel. She is credited as the inventor of the modern bra, as she is the first recipient of the patent for it back in 1914. Before that, corsets were the only choice women had – well, at least that’s what they thought until now. A recent discovery from an ancient castle in Austria has proven, that bras are not exactly new age. In fact, the bras that they discovered, hidden in a vault of the castle, date back more than 500 years. This is from the same period that Leonardo Da Vinci was still walking the Earth. The discovery also revealed that not only is the undergarment older than previously thought but so is the ‘sexy’ This old-school bra were decorated with lace, proving Victoria had secrets half of a millennium ago.

The menacing-looking Langberg Castle in East Tyrol, Austria is where a spicy discovery was recently made

Image credits: Aufbauwerk der Jugend – Berufsvorbereitung Schloss Lengberg

An over 500-year-old bra was found there, in a hidden vault

Image credits: Universität Innsbruck

Even though it was not in the best condition, it’s clear that it’s similar to the modern bra

Image credits: Universität Innsbruck

The intricate piece of undergarment is far from simple, in fact, it’s decorated to add some sex appeal

Image credits: Universität Innsbruck

These panties came in a set with the bra and the lace-decorated parts are visible to the eye

Image credits: Universität Innsbruck

The pre-Victorian Secret

Image credits: Universität Innsbruck

Also, these enormous panties were found, but it’s not yet confirmed whether they were worn by women or men

Image credits: Universität Innsbruck

The findings consisted of four linen bras and it rewrote history because it was universally accepted that bras became a thing only a century ago

Image credits: Universität Innsbruck

Some people pointed out that these pieces of underwear remind them of Raquel Welch in “One Million Years B.C”

Image credits: 20th Century Fox Film Corporation

Others shared their insights about this historical finding