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Woman Offers Advice To People Who Are Staying At Home With Their Spouse During The Coronavirus Quarantine
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People, Relationships2 years ago

Woman Offers Advice To People Who Are Staying At Home With Their Spouse During The Coronavirus Quarantine

Even though social distancing is highly advised during these difficult times and people choose to stay home with their loved ones, staying behind locked doors with your significant other 24/7 may not be as idyllic as it may seem from the first glance. Turns out, many couples who are not used to spending so much of their time together are having quite a hard time being confined in a small space together with their partners. Adding up to the stress of the potential illness and unstable situation of the whole world probably doesn’t help in keeping a peaceful mind as well.

However, digital illustrator and creative development manager Christine Knopp has 6+ years’ worth of experience in how to manage working from home together with your SO and didn’t hesitate to share it on Twitter.

More info: Kikidoodle

Illustrator Christine Knopp has been working from home together with her SO for 6+ years now

Image credits: KikiDoodleTweet

Maintaining a healthy relationship during the quarantine might not be an easy task for everyone since some of us are just not used to being around people 24/7 and cherish our alone time. But no worries, people with more experience on that will help to get you through. While Christine Knopp offered excellent advice based on her own experience in her tweets, we have some more professional advice from Pepper Schwartz, a psychology professor at the University of Washington, as well.

Image credits: KikiDoodleTweet

Thus, she just can’t wrap her head around why people find it hard staying home with their partners during the quarantine

“Scary times have the potential to drive people together or apart,” she says. But not all is lost as she adds that we may find “a new appreciation for having someone to face a scary future with”.

Image credits: KikiDoodleTweet

Thankfully, she has some solid advice to offer on how to manage your relationship during this period

Image credits: KikiDoodleTweet

“If people are stressed out, there are likely to be arguments,” says Daniel Kruger, a social and evolutionary psychologist at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health, adding to Schwartz’s point that dramatic times tend to heighten emotions and outcomes. He advises to avoid sensitive topics: “Don’t talk about politics or religion with your family” is especially worth adhering to during stressful quarantine times. It’s generally good to avoid talking about issues where people know there’s going to be fault lines and contentions,” Kruger says.

Image credits: KikiDoodleTweet

And says that having some alone time is not only important but also manageable even when you are both at home

Image credits: KikiDoodleTweet

He also believes we can take this time and make our relationships stronger than ever. “People get to know each other better and may appreciate these experiences,” he says and if that’s not encouraging, we don’t know what could be.

Image credits: KikiDoodleTweet

Image credits: KikiDoodleTweet

Image credits: KikiDoodleTweet

Most people agree with her but some think it’s healthy not to be glued to one another 24/7

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SirPatTheCat
Community Member
2 years ago

This is true, but we also can cut a little slack for people because just like some of the comments up there were saying, it's a change and people need time to adjust. It's not all black and white like you hate your spouse or your spouse is someone you can never be away from and you have to hang out all the time. Like if you express concerns that you will need to figure out how to be around your SO 24/7 because that's not something you normally do, people shouldn't be like "wow if it's like that, why are you even dating :/" That said I really don't like the "haha I hate my spouse, aren't our problems so funny" humor. Hate is a strong word for "we have disagreements and get on each other's nerves sometimes", and I don't think that's fair to the partner for someone to go around saying things like that. Overall I thought her advice was really good, just some people replying weren't quite getting it.

Daria B
Community Member
2 years ago (edited)

Your comment should be on top, really. I'm glad to see someone gets it and is avoiding the "look at me, I'm better" approach. My husband and I don't really have so much problems being together or together alone, but I understand both sides. It's all about the change of lifestyle, and people and relationships are way to complex to be boxed into "working vs. failure". This post is a sound advice to those who have difficulties dealing with change, no need to point fingers and criticise those who need help.

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Lara Mig
Community Member
2 years ago

One of the most important reasons I married my wife is that being around her, even for prolonged periods of time, does not stress me out. I am finding out during this quarantine that this really is the most important criterion in deciding whom to marry.

BobbyMcD
Community Member
2 years ago (edited)

I've worked from home with my partner for a decade and we both love it and each other. I do sometimes wonder if people who say this sort of thing are just not that into whoever they are with. Also, working from home together doesn't mean you both have to be on top of each other. We like to work in separate rooms and check in with each other several times throughout the day and catch up then.

Daria B
Community Member
2 years ago (edited)

This is the healthy way and I'm happy for you. I believe there's various people with various living situations. Some of those couples, indeed, aren't that much into one another, but some of them just cannot afford to live in a place that would allow them to distance from each other in separate rooms. So many couples live in homes that are literally composed of just one living room which is used as a bedroom, a kitchen (often not even separated from the living room/bedroom), a toilet and, if lucky, a tiny wee little additional room that usually serves as storage. My husband and I live in a place like this, plus a balcony for the laundry. We don't fight or quarrel, and we're okay with staying together, but I do understand the need for some more space.

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SirPatTheCat
Community Member
2 years ago

This is true, but we also can cut a little slack for people because just like some of the comments up there were saying, it's a change and people need time to adjust. It's not all black and white like you hate your spouse or your spouse is someone you can never be away from and you have to hang out all the time. Like if you express concerns that you will need to figure out how to be around your SO 24/7 because that's not something you normally do, people shouldn't be like "wow if it's like that, why are you even dating :/" That said I really don't like the "haha I hate my spouse, aren't our problems so funny" humor. Hate is a strong word for "we have disagreements and get on each other's nerves sometimes", and I don't think that's fair to the partner for someone to go around saying things like that. Overall I thought her advice was really good, just some people replying weren't quite getting it.

Daria B
Community Member
2 years ago (edited)

Your comment should be on top, really. I'm glad to see someone gets it and is avoiding the "look at me, I'm better" approach. My husband and I don't really have so much problems being together or together alone, but I understand both sides. It's all about the change of lifestyle, and people and relationships are way to complex to be boxed into "working vs. failure". This post is a sound advice to those who have difficulties dealing with change, no need to point fingers and criticise those who need help.

Load More Replies...
Lara Mig
Community Member
2 years ago

One of the most important reasons I married my wife is that being around her, even for prolonged periods of time, does not stress me out. I am finding out during this quarantine that this really is the most important criterion in deciding whom to marry.

BobbyMcD
Community Member
2 years ago (edited)

I've worked from home with my partner for a decade and we both love it and each other. I do sometimes wonder if people who say this sort of thing are just not that into whoever they are with. Also, working from home together doesn't mean you both have to be on top of each other. We like to work in separate rooms and check in with each other several times throughout the day and catch up then.

Daria B
Community Member
2 years ago (edited)

This is the healthy way and I'm happy for you. I believe there's various people with various living situations. Some of those couples, indeed, aren't that much into one another, but some of them just cannot afford to live in a place that would allow them to distance from each other in separate rooms. So many couples live in homes that are literally composed of just one living room which is used as a bedroom, a kitchen (often not even separated from the living room/bedroom), a toilet and, if lucky, a tiny wee little additional room that usually serves as storage. My husband and I live in a place like this, plus a balcony for the laundry. We don't fight or quarrel, and we're okay with staying together, but I do understand the need for some more space.

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