Gintarė Bertauskienė from Kaunas, Lithuania had been dreaming about owning a Komondor for most of her life. When she was little, Gintarė got a postcard featuring one of these majestic dogs and has kept it ever since. However, the time came and Gintarė made her dream come true. Now, she’s a proud owner of Hanga, one of the two mop dogs in the country.

The first thing people notice when they see Hanga is her unusual fur. Only a handful of dog breeds has natural dreadlocks, and the Komondor is one of them. Well, the proper terms for dog dreadlocks are cords, flocks, and mats, but you get the idea. Their long and thick coat requires a lot of care, but Hanga is lucky — her human, Gintarė, is a pet groomer!

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Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Hanga became an internet sensation when LADbible shared a video of the pup swimming in a lake. The clip has received over 19 million views, and, long story short, Gintarė even made some money off of it which she used to pay for Hanga’s surgery.

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Hanga receives a lot of attention on the streets as well. Passers-by are constantly asking Gintarė if they can take a picture of her unique dog. “Sometimes we make our trips to the city in the evening just to avoid all the attention,” the woman told Kas Vyksta. “Hanga is a very protective dog and is wary of strangers. If there are too many of them, she might get tensed.”

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Considering that the Komondor is built for livestock guarding, this is completely understandable. Its temperament is like that of most livestock dogs; it is calm and collected when things are normal, but if the dog senses trouble, it will fearlessly defend the herd. The Komondor was bred to make decisions on its own and act independently.

 

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Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

If you’re thinking about getting a Komondor, keep in mind that because of its size, power, speed, and temperament, a lack of obedience training can result in dangerous situations. Typically, Komondors are good at learning things, especially if they start early (ideally, between 4–8 months).

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Adorable Komondor in Nemunas River (part II) #shaggydog #komondor #dog #mopdog #rasta #carpet #adorabledog

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Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

When Komondor puppies are born, they don’t have dreads, they’re born with a short, white coat that gradually forms into fluffy curls as the dog grows.

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas

When they are around 1-year-old, the curls form into matted patches and that is when human intervention is needed to separate it into individual cords. Once the Komondor reaches age 5, the coat will have reached its full potential.

Image credits: Komondor HANGA Kaunas