I fancy myself a bug and botanical portrait photographer. Sounds strange, but I love showing people the beauty and diversity of insects and spiders up close.


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I spent all summer photographing the diversity of insects and spiders in my backyard and local arboretum in NE Ohio. Here are my favorite 40 images.

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#1 Birth Of An Assassin Bug Nymph (Zelus Luridus)

Birth Of An Assassin Bug Nymph (Zelus Luridus)

I photographed this assassin bug nymph emerging from his egg case at the zoo, of all places. While my family was viewing the snow leopards, I was obsessing over this once-in-a-lifetime shot. When I returned a few hours later, nearly two dozen nymphs had emerged!

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Phemonoe 153 1 year ago

What an amazing moment to capture! Thank you for sharing this!

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#2 Candy-Striped Leafhopper (Graphocephala Coccinea)

Candy-Striped Leafhopper (Graphocephala Coccinea)

Many people are shocked to learn these beautiful leafhoppers are a common backyard bug. Keep a close eye on your garden and you'll likely find one of these beauties jumping from one plant to another!

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Hatsune Chiku 1 year ago

OMG, the stripes look painted on! Nature is beautiful

#3 Carpenter Bee (Xylocopa)

Carpenter Bee (Xylocopa)

Notice the carpenter bee's tongue as it feeds on nectar from milkweed.

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Etienne Pisano 1 year ago

I LOVE bee!!! Brava!!!

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#4 Oak Treehopper (Platycotis Vittata)

Oak Treehopper (Platycotis Vittata)

I always imagined that I would need to travel to exotic places to photograph insects as beautiful as this oak treehopper. I've been lucky enough to find and photography two colonies of oak treehoppers in my local arboretum. Near each colony of treehopper nymphs, I found a single adult. This is mama treehopper - she keeps watch over her nymphs as they develop and grow. Insects with maternal instincts =... Read More

I always imagined that I would need to travel to exotic places to photograph insects as beautiful as this oak treehopper. I've been lucky enough to find and photography two colonies of oak treehoppers in my local arboretum. Near each colony of treehopper nymphs, I found a single adult. This is mama treehopper - she keeps watch over her nymphs as they develop and grow. Insects with maternal instincts = awesome!

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Etienne Pisano 1 year ago

Every photo is a piece of art!! Nature is so amazing!!

#5 Citrus Flatid Planthopper (Metcalfa Pruinosa)

Citrus Flatid Planthopper (Metcalfa Pruinosa)

We don't have a lot of citrus growing in Ohio, but don't be fooled by the name - you can find this planthopper on a wide range of woody plant hosts, not just citrus!

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Patrick Farley 1 year ago

almost looks like the insect version of a snowy owl

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#6 Oak Treehopper Nymphs (Platycotis Vittata)

Oak Treehopper Nymphs (Platycotis Vittata)

These are two of a much larger oak treehopper colony. The nymphs congregate on a single small branch as they develop and grow through five nymphal instars.

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Etienne Pisano 1 year ago

Not a romantic date? :-)

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#7 Mantidfly (Mantispidae)

Mantidfly (Mantispidae)

Probably the most badass of all the bugs I've photographed, mantidflies are basically a mix of praying mantis, dragonfly, and wasp. This one has eyes like the galaxy!

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Kristel Bijnen 1 year ago

Wow, beautiful photo! And love the combinations!

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#8 Crab Spider (Thomisidae)

Crab Spider (Thomisidae)

Crab spiders are appropriately named since they hold their eight legs in a way that resembles a crab!

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BobbyK 1 year ago

As a kid, I used to find Crab Spiders hiding in my mother's roses.

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#9 Planthopper Nymph (Fulgoromorpha)

Planthopper Nymph (Fulgoromorpha)

I'm not sure of the exact species of this plant hopper nymph, but I like to think the species name may be something like "firecracker butt."

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Jenn 1 year ago

FIRECRACKER BUTT!!! too good!

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#10 Honey Bee (Apis)

Honey Bee (Apis)

While they may be everyone's favorite, honey bees represent only a tiny sliver of bee diversity. Did you know there are roughly 20,000 species of bees?!

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Etienne Pisano 1 year ago

Hello Bee!!!