Some people go above and beyond the call of duty for their loved ones. Case in point, Twitter user AshciR recently posted online an endearing story about how his significant other leaves him warm, fun and quirky messages all around the house to help him fight against his seasonal depression. Now that’s real love!

AshciR’s incredible story touched a lot of internet users’ hearts and it went viral. It racked up over nearly 50,000 retweets and got more than 292,200 likes on Twitter. That’s honestly more than I could count to. Make sure you’re not eating or drinking anything while scrolling down because these messages will make you awww and chuckle. They sure made me smile. Make sure to scroll down for Bored Panda’s interview with Dr. Erin Michalak from the University of British Columbia.

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One Twitter user, who suffers from seasonal depression, shared that his girlfriend leaves him cute messages around the house

Image credits: AshciR

Image credits: AshciR

Image credits: AshciR

His girlfriend is very kind-hearted and has a good sense of humor

Image credits: AshciR

Image credits: AshciR

Image credits: AshciR

I believe many of us would agree that the Twitter user’s girlfriend is kind-hearted, and an example of what all people should aspire to grow up to be. It’s very clear from such cute notes like “Sweet dreams, my baby. I love you. You’re amazing. You’re the best boyfriend, person, best friend a girl could ever have.” It’s also obvious that she has a great sense of humor. Case in point, her message that says “I love when you poop.” I laughed as though I were back in sixth grade.

Image credits: AshciR

Image credits: AshciR

Image credits: AshciR

Image credits: AshciR

Image credits: AshciR

Image credits: AshciR

Image credits: AshciR

Anyone with loved ones who suffer from depression — any type of depression — can tell you that it’s nothing to scoff at. Support means everything. Seasonal depression or seasonal affective disorder (aptly shortened to SAD) is also known as the winter blues. Mental Health America explains that SAD is a “subtype of depression or bipolar disorder that occurs and ends around the same time every year.” While SAD mostly starts in autumn, there are cases when people suffer from it even in spring or summer.

Around 1 in 20 people living in the United States experience seasonal depression; and around 80% of those affected by SAD are women. This type of depression occurs when you get very little sunlight. Naturally, what can help is getting more sunlight or signing up for bright light therapy. In some cases, antidepressants can also help, but this step must be discussed with your doctor. And we’re pretty sure that getting lots of love, support, and cute notes can help as well.

People were amazed by how strong the couple’s relationship is

Image credits: guruintraining_

Image credits: CuteTish

Image credits: ambitiousleena

Image credits: TheSibbyl

Professor Erin Michalak from the Department of Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia told Bored Panda more about Seasonal Affective Disorder in an interview.

“Many people may feel mildly down during the winter months, but Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD, describes people who experience clinical depression only during the fall/winter seasons. One of the main causes is lack of exposure to sunlight during the winter months — we know from research that light has a biological effect on neurotransmitters in the brain. People with SAD may also have disturbances in their brain’s “biological clock” that controls mood, sleep and hormones — this clock can get “delayed” in the winter months. The good news is that SAD is a high treatment condition, either through light therapy (a safe and easy-to-use medical treatment), medications, or a combination of both — and a good dose of self-care will help manage the symptoms too.”

Dr. Michalak also explained that “SAD appears to be more common the more north you live. Generally speaking, about 1-3% of people in more northern countries will experience SAD, but up to 15% of people will describe having the “winter blues” — winter symptoms similar to SAD, but not clinical depression. In some ways, SAD might be less stigmatized by society than other forms of depression because it’s viewed as having a clear biological cause. But on the other hand, there’s also the risk of underplaying the potential severity of the condition.”

Furthermore, the professor said that “depression, regardless of whether it’s seasonal or non-seasonal, holds the potential to erode and damage relationships. One of the hallmarks of SAD is that the person’s symptoms of depression remit during the spring and summer months.”

“Without treatment, many people with SAD can expect to often (but not always) experience clinical depression or significant lowering of mood during the winter. But the predictability of SAD also offers you and your family the opportunity to plan in advance for when your relationships will need some extra TLC,” Dr. Michalak said. “It helps to remember that, for many people, SAD represents a form of clinical depression.  It’s not a personal flaw or weakness. Self-care and treatment strategies for depression are most effective when they are supported and reinforced by the person’s loved ones and social support network. And people supporting people with depression should always remember their own self-care!”