In the United States conversations about immigration have reached a fever pitch but for their northern neighbors, the stance on inviting in foreigners is cooler. Home to one of the most diverse cities in the world, Toronto, Canada has been outspoken about how it welcomes those looking for a new home, with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau even tweeting in 2017: “To those fleeing persecution, terror & war, Canadians will welcome you, regardless of your faith. Diversity is our strength #WelcomeToCanada.”

Canadian Raptors superfan Nav Bhatia embodies this spirit with his immigrant story and has become a symbol for the country, proudly celebrating on the sidelines of every basketball game since he arrived. For those not familiar with Bhatia, Twitter user Muhammad Lila took to Twitter to share his story and the beauty of embracing diversity.

Someone took to Twitter to share the story of a Canadian Raptors superfan who embodies the country’s diversity

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: MuhammadLila

Image credits: superfan_nav

In 2017 the BBC announced on BBC Radio that Toronto was the most diverse city in the world. The city has continued to rank as one of the most multicultural cities in the world. Toronto is home to over 200 distinct ethnic groups and was ranked second by the UN as the city with the largest community of foreign-born residents after Miami. The capital of Ontario has over 160 languages with English being the primary dialect.

Image credits: superfan_nav

According to The World Atlas, over 50% of the people living in Toronto come from foreign origins. The majority of residents are from the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Africa. Over 100,000 immigrants are estimated to arrive in the city annually. The city’s multicultural communities can be observed in neighborhoods like Little Jamaica, Little India, Little Italy, Koreatown, Greektown and Chinatown, just to name a few.

Image credits: superfan_nav

The diversity of the city has given way to a diverse fanbase. Not only do immigrants support the team because of newfound Canadian pride but because of the diverse rosters. Whether it is the African players (Serge Ibaka and Pascal Siakam), Canadian-born hooper Chris Boucher or Spanish powerhouse Marc (Big Spain) Gasol there is an array of faces and talent to appreciate.

Image credits: superfan_nav

People in the comments loved seeing diverse representation appreciated