Tanks rolled out onto the battlefields of World War I nearly a hundred years ago. Not all of them survived the war to to become museum pieces; many of these lumbering steel behemoths remain stuck where they were rendered immobile. Each was home to three or more fighting men, and not all of them survived the demise of their armored fighting vehicle.

This collection of tanks reclaimed by nature comes from all over the world. From World War II Japanese tanks that found their resting place in the jungles where they struggled against their American counterparts, to the rare German machines now stuck in some forgotten part of Eastern Europe, they're all finally at peace.

#1 Shumshu, Russia

Shumshu, Russia

u-96 Report

AndresTomlin 5 months ago

Looks like a scene from Howl's Moving Castle

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#3 Tank Taken Over By Nature

Tank Taken Over By Nature

imgur Report

DanIbekwe 5 months ago

M41 light tank (1950s, US built, widely exported).

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#4 Saipan, Northern Mariana Islands

Saipan,  Northern Mariana Islands

abandoned.photos Report

DanIbekwe 5 months ago

Another Sherman, E pluribus unum, one of the very many.

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#5 Tank Taken Over By Nature

Tank Taken Over By Nature

Report

NemanjaMitković 5 months ago

This photo was made in firing range of army barracks in Pancevo, Serbia, and vehicle was destroyed long after WW2, as a stationary target.

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#6 Tanks In Antarctica

Tanks In Antarctica

kevinraber.com Report

MilanKrstic 5 months ago

why would someone drive tanks in Antartica?

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#9 Abandoned Tankn In East Germany

Abandoned Tankn In East Germany

Alexander J E Bradley Report

DanIbekwe 5 months ago

T-34/85. WW2-era tank, the USSR kept them in production for export until 1961.

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#10 Abandoned Tank Base In Russia

Abandoned Tank Base In Russia

Alex Klochkov Report

DaveMatteson 5 months ago

T34/85 in the foreground and a T54 in the background. They were probably used as gunnery training targets.

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