Singapore-based artist Thomas Yang created these unique artworks using a tool normally associated with tracking mud into your flat – bicycle tires. By strategically placing these tire marks, they become perfectly suited to repeat complex structures like the Eiffel tower or the Empire State Building.


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“The idea came up while I was toying around with ideas on how I can paint with a bicycle. Tire tracks were the first thing in my mind. Then I went further to explore the characteristics on each of the tire pattern and realized that I could possibly paint some building structures” Yang explains.

Yang, who is a cycling enthusiast himself, made four different prints – “The Cyclist’s Empire” (the Empire State Building), “God Save the Bike” (Tower Bridge), “Bicycle Mon Amour” (Eiffel Tower) and “The Unforbidden Cyclist” (the Forbidden City), producing only 100 printed copies of each one. Unsurprisingly, all of them were quickly sold out, with the proud owners being listed on 100copies.net (might be useful if you’re desperate to get one).

More info: www.100copies.net

“There’s only one rule in choosing the popular landmarks: there has to be cycling culture in their city.”

“A total of 20 tires were used to create this series.”

Each piece comes stamped with a quirky name and edition number, along with its own special bike-themed description.

“The process in fact was very difficult. Each of the landmarks were made with at least 40 trials to give you the best end result in order to make into 100 copies.”