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This Guy Went “Above And Beyond” At Work For 3 Years – Shared How He Was Rewarded By His Boss
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People1 year ago

This Guy Went “Above And Beyond” At Work For 3 Years – Shared How He Was Rewarded By His Boss

Let’s just put it this way: asking for a raise is not the most pleasant thing out there. After all, this survey shows how grim the reality of doing so may be: a whopping 33% of employees who were denied a raise were provided no rationale. And of those who did receive some rationale, just over 25% actually believed it. Do I smell some serious communication issues happening between employees and their employers?

This story comes from an Imgur user who said he had been going “above and beyond” every day for the last 3 years until he finally asked for a merit raise. However, instead of an encouraging approval, the employee received a cold “no” without explanation.

Read the full story below, which for many may sadly sound all too relatable, and be sure to share your thoughts in the comments. Also, whoever has been in a similar position, let us know how you handled it.

Image credits: SSGCatfish

It takes a lot of courage after gathering all your confidence, support and feedback from your co-workers to go to your superior and ask for a raise. So it’s only fair to get very upset after being denied one, especially if you feel and know that you really deserve this one. And you’re far from the only one.

In fact, a PayScale survey found that a majority of companies said that they aren’t planning to provide a meaningful pay increase to their staff this year. Moreover, nearly 70 percent said they plan to provide pay increases of 3 percent or less to some of their employees. But what if you don’t take “no” for the end of conversation and continue the negotiation further?

Asking “why” is a fair follow-up question after being denied a raise. A question like “I’d really love to get a better understanding of why my request wasn’t granted. Is there something I can be doing more of?” is the way to go, according to Lydia Frank, vice president of content strategy at PayScale. And if your supervisor is not able to provide a clear answer, take it as a big bright red flag.

And this is what people had to comment on this whole situation

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Marcellus II
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I like how half the comments are "Jump ship", "look for another place" when the OP already details the two alternatives in their location as being even worse, with no desire to move house over this.

ʕ º ᴥ ºʔ
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Maybe they commented before reading the bottom or the last part could have been an edit?

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Stephanie Cunningham
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I've worked super hard for nearly 17 years at my job, including volunteering for tons of projects that were way above my pay grade, all with the hope of being promoted to office manager when the previous manager retired. Just found out that I didn't get the job; instead, they hired someone from outside the division. I naively thought that loyalty, hard work, and being a team player would get me somewhere, but obviously I was wrong. Now I'm planning to jump ship as soon as I can find an opening somewhere.

Magpie Magoo
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

That's a hell of a slap in the face and I don't blame you one bit!

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WilvanderHeijden
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

If the guy can't get another job or move to get another job, the best thing he can do is to stop doing al the extra "behind the scene" work and stick to his job description. None of his employers or co-workers will be working extra without any compensation, so he'd be a fool if he continued working his @ss off, knowing that it won't get him a better pay. If the hospital suffers because of his inactivity, they might reconsider their point of view. If he's capable of arranging matters in a way that his absence would be noted in 3 years, I'm sure he has it in him to be successful and get a better paying job elsewhere. Even if it may set him back now.

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Marcellus II
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I like how half the comments are "Jump ship", "look for another place" when the OP already details the two alternatives in their location as being even worse, with no desire to move house over this.

ʕ º ᴥ ºʔ
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

Maybe they commented before reading the bottom or the last part could have been an edit?

Load More Replies...
Stephanie Cunningham
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

I've worked super hard for nearly 17 years at my job, including volunteering for tons of projects that were way above my pay grade, all with the hope of being promoted to office manager when the previous manager retired. Just found out that I didn't get the job; instead, they hired someone from outside the division. I naively thought that loyalty, hard work, and being a team player would get me somewhere, but obviously I was wrong. Now I'm planning to jump ship as soon as I can find an opening somewhere.

Magpie Magoo
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

That's a hell of a slap in the face and I don't blame you one bit!

Load More Replies...
WilvanderHeijden
Community Member
1 year ago Created by potrace 1.15, written by Peter Selinger 2001-2017

If the guy can't get another job or move to get another job, the best thing he can do is to stop doing al the extra "behind the scene" work and stick to his job description. None of his employers or co-workers will be working extra without any compensation, so he'd be a fool if he continued working his @ss off, knowing that it won't get him a better pay. If the hospital suffers because of his inactivity, they might reconsider their point of view. If he's capable of arranging matters in a way that his absence would be noted in 3 years, I'm sure he has it in him to be successful and get a better paying job elsewhere. Even if it may set him back now.

Load More Comments
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