Time heals all wounds, right? Sure, sometimes. But that is not the case when you forgot to bring the sauce to a BBQ eleven years ago. Your own family will needle you on such an irreparable disaster for the rest of their lives.

People will remain salty about petty injustices, and there's not that much anyone can do about it. Someone might say something about forgiveness, but then no one would get to complain. So where's the fun in that?

Kids are no exception. Recently, Todd Dillard's viral tweet kickstarted a thread where parents share the verbal jabs their kids throw at them for the petty crimes they have committed. And let me tell you, they sting.

Todd said his daughter is a curious and kind girl.

"I remember scraping off the burnt part of the quesadilla and then serving it to her," he told Bored Panda. "The look on her face was like I'd made dinner by microwaving socks! I think I made meatballs for her instead."

This time, she did end up having a quesadilla. However, it wasn't burned.

#1

Parents-Share-Things-Kids-Refuse-To-Forget

BigAlHTX Report

UncleRussian
Community Member
1 year ago

Well hey, at least you got your lunchbox back!

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While research has demonstrated that very young children can recall memories with specific details, for memories of their parents failing to become autobiographical—part of the child’s life story and real to them—there must first be a developed sense of self and personal identity.

Interestingly, children do not fully develop a sense of self until they're around 1 ½ or 2 years of age. Having a sense of self, the “I” separate from others, gives a place for memory to be organized and develop personal meaning.

#2

Parents-Share-Things-Kids-Refuse-To-Forget

denisemassar Report

Marcellus the Third
Community Member
1 year ago

Needing a fiver to pay someone (decades ago, when paper money & physically meeting a person still was a thing, so maybe 2019 or so), I exchanged my tenner for two of their five. They still feel shortchanged, even though they're outstanding at math. I suppose it is a lesson in scarcity-added-value.

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Although memory is not fully developed in infancy, the early childhood period (birth through age 8) is important for children in building and acquiring the development of memory.

Looking at memory development can provide parents with a new way to think about and plan for their children. Think of it like this, memory development not only takes you back to experiences that hold meaning, but it is a complex cognitive ability that is important in many aspects of thinking and learning, such as language and literacy, planning, following directions, problem-solving, reflecting, imagining, and the overall ability to form a positive sense of self. Our memory is vital to our everyday life.

#3

Parents-Share-Things-Kids-Refuse-To-Forget

dandelionbrain Report

Doggo Froggo
Community Member
1 year ago

Well, what do you expect then? Poor kid

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#4

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sydj1405 Report

Luisa Vasconcelos
Community Member
1 year ago

RiP Charlie.

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Remembering starts with understanding. Children learn about memory by talking with others and by experiencing life within their environments. However, if children experience something that they do not fully understand, they are less likely to remember it (or to recall events correctly).

So adults play a significant role in helping children understand and remember.

#5

Parents-Share-Things-Kids-Refuse-To-Forget

_mercyaguilar Report

PandaJon
Community Member
1 year ago

Nice scam. I think I'll head to the senior center today

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#6

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GaabLab Report

Little Ms. Quirky
Community Member
1 year ago

Your son has a point tho

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#7

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ca_london Report

glowworm2
Community Member
1 year ago

This one is cute!

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The most important thing adults can do is to provide responsive, joyful, and nurturing interactions with children. Another quite important, yet simple way adults can contribute is by telling stories and narrating experiences, especially the ones they have shared with children. By doing so, the adult can revisit events, provoke thought, and even help children recall what they cannot remember. In essence, the adult is reconstructing the shared memory.

#8

Parents-Share-Things-Kids-Refuse-To-Forget

Gambler39202 Report

Dooberman
Community Member
1 year ago

LOOOOOOOOL BUUUUURN (AND LITERALLY TOO)

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#9

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dawgplasma Report

Dooberman
Community Member
1 year ago

lol

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#10

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cohmomto3 Report

Doggo Froggo
Community Member
1 year ago

Aaaaawwwww sweet dad

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#11

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ABananaRambling Report

WilvanderHeijden
Community Member
1 year ago

It's a myth that parents don't have a favorite child.

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This brings us to language. It bridges understanding and helps in shaping memory. Adults can foster language with children by telling stories, retelling events, and asking questions that relate to experiences children have had. Questions that tap into the what, the where, the when, the why, and the how really help children gather details, descriptions, and emotions about the experience.

Eventually, children will start to ask themselves the same types of questions that the adults have been asking. As children look inward, ask questions, and try to understand their own thoughts, they are forming memories.

#12

Parents-Share-Things-Kids-Refuse-To-Forget

elle_sapp Report

Ramen
Community Member
1 year ago

maybe its 123? idk

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#13

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Clairebeario729 Report

Kristof De Smet
Community Member
1 year ago

What an awful mom are you! You burned their toys! :-D

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#14

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maureenflaherty Report

Nigel Rodgers
Community Member
1 year ago

Lol twins. The individuality force is strong with these ones.

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#15

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HowlinJustice Report

Hans
Community Member
1 year ago

I mean, they only know life with you. It must be unimaginable that you had a life before knowing them...

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But in order for children to be able to imagine, they must use information that is stored in the brain (things they remember and understand). When they begin to imagine, the details recombine in a new way.

Along with fostering language, adults can cultivate children's imaginative play by using props, materials, and photographs–anything that sparks a connection to both past memories and to form newly imagined ideas. Drawing tools and materials are also good support for documenting, organizing, and illustrating past and forthcoming ideas.

#16

Parents-Share-Things-Kids-Refuse-To-Forget

laura_rudkin Report

Katherine Boag
Community Member
1 year ago

I've had enough therapy to take that deal too XD

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#17

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pumpkinkeely Report

Kristof De Smet
Community Member
1 year ago

lol

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#18

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PeteJolicoeur Report

PandaJon
Community Member
1 year ago

Was it Sole?

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#19

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SheldonJuliana Report

Ramen
Community Member
1 year ago

if you had it why didnt you jus eat it?

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When children start going to school, they must be able to process information to follow directions and remember classroom rules.

To process information, children need to categorize, understand, and respond to the message that an adult gives them.

But remember, before they can process a message, all parts of it must be understood. Since children have limited memory spans, they may miss part of the message, or even all of it, if they have to process too many things at once.

#20

Parents-Share-Things-Kids-Refuse-To-Forget

Taupher Report

Danielle Terese
Community Member
1 year ago

Nice tactic from the kid

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#21

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Mikevago Report

Tiredpossum
Community Member
1 year ago

Yeah! Why didn't you let him throw it away!

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#22

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26aball Report

Paul Budhram
Community Member
1 year ago

lol Burnip

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#23

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mbscott77 Report

Max
Community Member
1 year ago

Make the poor kid some more cookies.

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Again, adults can help children to remember and do what we ask of them by giving directions that are uncomplicated and stated effectively, such as “Please put the books on the bookshelf”. It is much better than “Let’s clean up.”

Also, use clear directives of what to do as opposed to what not to do. For example, it is better to ask children to “please walk” as opposed to “no running”.

#24

Parents-Share-Things-Kids-Refuse-To-Forget

SacTownGrandma Report

Dooberman
Community Member
1 year ago

oww- oww- owww- mo-ow- mom st-ow stop

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#25

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hematocritico Report

Brivid
Community Member
1 year ago

I understand, my mom 74 year old mother still asks me if I (43) need to "go potty" before we leave the house.

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#26

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Choonghagen Report

Max
Community Member
1 year ago

Awww

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#27

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Kristof De Smet
Community Member
1 year ago

My mom once undercooked the eggs she was giving to my dad for his lunch. He still asks her if he needs a straw to eat his eggs.

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We can't stress this enough—it really helps when adults clearly explain the “why” of a direction. For example, when children are asked to put the books away, we might add that, “We need to put our books back on the shelf so we can find them tomorrow.”

The child doesn’t have to use any memory to wonder why they have to put the books away and can focus on the task and not the reason behind it.

#28

Parents-Share-Things-Kids-Refuse-To-Forget

librarythingtim Report

mehoi
Community Member
1 year ago

Sounds like your son was really attached to that ice cream. Imagine what he'd be saying if you had forgotten and driven off with the ice cream on the car roof... xD

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#29

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rebcrawford Report

DogMom
Community Member
1 year ago

Sharp child

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#30

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JessicaSillers Report

Aaron W
Community Member
1 year ago

Poor Dad.

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#31

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kateasterisk Report

Kristof De Smet
Community Member
1 year ago

That must have been quite a tree house.

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Lastly, routines. They can also help children form memory. By repeating behaviors, children’s knowledge base increases and becomes more organized. Through repetitive routines, children can fully process information. Responses are remembered and become more automatic. Keep routines simple and consistent. Consider breaking activities into steps and introducing steps gradually.

#32

Parents-Share-Things-Kids-Refuse-To-Forget

DarkandWondrous Report

Luisa Vasconcelos
Community Member
1 year ago

Yes, what kind of dad do this, anyway? 😜

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#33

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no_maiden Report

Max
Community Member
1 year ago

I had a similar experience when I was five and discovered that chili chocolate is amazing.

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#34

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dopemixtape78 Report

Marcellus the Third
Community Member
1 year ago

Ooh I'd forgotten the time mom cut my sister's hair along with the top of her ear... So Much Blood. That used to come up a lot for a decade and a half, basically until she moved out.

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#35

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_DanceThruLife_ Report

WilvanderHeijden
Community Member
1 year ago

Already ignoring the mental trauma of your child? You burned the waffles!!!

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#36

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cassie8517 Report

Marcellus the Third
Community Member
1 year ago

I googled 'scallop juice' and I still don't know what that is.

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#37

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jssinwashington Report

Katherine Boag
Community Member
1 year ago

It's sooooo hard not to do though, I've clipped myself accidentally so many times

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#38

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NerdRage42 Report

DogMom
Community Member
1 year ago

That might have been the plan all along

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#39

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creaturesbynagy Report

JayWantsACat
Community Member
1 year ago

At least it wasn't scallop juice mac and cheese.

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#40

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JuicyFruit0403 Report

Isabella Vega
Community Member
1 year ago

Lolll

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#41

Parents-Share-Things-Kids-Refuse-To-Forget

ambernoelle Report

Colin Mochrie At Its Finest
Community Member
1 year ago

Awww. I have these protein bars Injust started trying -brownie and chocolate chip cookie dough from Costco, very good - I don't want to share so I say it has coffee and don't show my 7 year old the pic. Surprised she hasn't read the ingredients like she enjoys doing I hope they don't draw pics of my protein bars.

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#42

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Colin Mochrie At Its Finest
Community Member
1 year ago

Ouch! Poor kid.

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#43

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jlq529 Report

Lydia Shen
Community Member
1 year ago

thats why they were so smooth!

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#44

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CelestialBrujaV Report

Tiredpossum
Community Member
1 year ago

Are you sure?

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#45

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Somnii4 Report

Curry on...
Community Member
1 year ago

What's tummy time?

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