There’s more to a person than their looks. Or their smell. However, the little ones might not know this yet. So, Singaporean dad, Calvin Soh explained how to answer kids if they complain about a migrant worker who has an unpleasant body odor.

He did it through a comic, posting it on his Facebook page Father and Son, where he also shares his everyday life of being a father.

So far, Father and Son doesn’t have a huge following, but considering Soh’s sincere tone, it’s just a matter of time before the numbers start growing.

Image credits: Father and son

Image credits: Father and son

Image credits: Father and son

Image credits: Father and son

Image credits: Father and son

Image credits: Father and son

It took a while before Soh tapped into his artistic potential. “I didn’t do well in school, did a variety of jobs after the army and finally stumbled into advertising where I did quite well,” he told Bored Panda.” Was ranked the number 1 Creative in Asia and worked in NY before coming back as the youngest President of a regional network.”

His son is 16 now and studying in Helsinki. Soh also has a 13-year-old daughter. “He has a new game to make creativity a habit for kids and she has a new jewelry collection to empower women.”

“I would say my son is curious, creative, thinks critically, is reflective, and unfazed by failure,” Soh said. “An old soul in a teenager. At 6, he pulled me aside and said ‘Dad, don’t always say ‘No’ to me. Let me live a little.'”

Soh started Father and Son to record the conversations the two of them were having. After a while, his daughter also started appearing in the comics. “It’s a collection of the stupid things that happen in all families and our personal musings,” he explained, saying that it can be something his kids will be able to remember him by.

Image credits: Father and son

The Asian nation of Singapore with approximately 5.6 million residents has about 1 million migrant workers from countries like Bangladesh, Indonesia, China, and Myanmar to fuel its powerhouse economy. They usually work in sectors from construction to services and home help.

According to the South China Morning Post, the laborers who build the city’s skyline are paid as little as $15 for a 12-hour shift.

Inhumane labor abuse cases are reported to be rare in the rich city-state, however, campaigners say migrants sometimes have to endure salary delays, having their travel documents withheld and massive debts that rack up in fees they pay agents to get work.

The good news is that most Singaporeans accept that immigration is important to the country. Last year, the Institute of Policy Studies (IPS) conducted a survey of about 4,000 Singapore citizens and permanent residents, and about 9 in 10 of them felt that it was good to have people of different nationalities living in the same neighborhood. Moreover, they said they can learn a lot from the immigrants’ cultures.

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