The Unseen Art project, which is being run by Helsinki-based designer Marc Dillon, is using 3D printing to give blind people the opportunity to experience classical art that many sighted people might take for granted.

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“Imagine not knowing what Mona Lisa’s smile looks like, or Van Gogh’s sunflowers. Imagine you heard people talking about them and knew they existed, but could never experience them for yourself. For the millions of people who are blind, that’s a reality,” the project explains in a video. They use 3D imaging and sand-based 3D printing to recreate these works of art on a scale and quality that can be put on display in museums.

Though their approach is unique, the Unseen Art project is not the first to have come up with this concept. 3D printing has been used to turn photos into “Touchable Memories” and even to help a blind mother “see” the ultrasound of her unborn child.

Unseen Art is currently running an IndieGoGo fundraiser, so if you like what they’re doing, consider chipping in!

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The Unseen Art project wants to let the blind “see” paintings like the Mona Lisa for the first time

“It would be a revolution to get blind people going to art galleries, people hate them because there is nothing there to touch!” says designer Marc Dillon

He’s raising money to create an online repository where artists could submit their art in 3D formats, letting anyone with a 3D printer print it

If you like what they’re doing, you can help them with their IndieGoGo fundraiser

Watch Riikka feel the Mona Lisa for the first time: