Check out the pattern below. What do you see? A bunch of lines and boxes, right? Well believe it or not, there’s actually sixteen circles hiding in there somewhere. We know, it sounds crazy, but you’ll just have to trust us on this one.


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It’s called the Coffer Illusion, and it was a finalist in the 2006 Best Illusion of the Year contest. It was created by Anthony Norcia, formerly of the Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, and it’s called the Coffer Illusion because Coffer is an architectural term used to refer to a series of sunken panels in various shapes.

The picture was recently uploaded by somebody called i124nk8, and it’s been astounding and bamboozling the internet ever since. Some people can see the circles, some people can’t. Can you? Then let us know in the comments below!

Optical illusions work by using color, light and patterns to create images that are designed to confuse the brain. They occur because our mind is trying to interpret what our eyes see, thereby creating a perception that doesn’t match the real image in front of us.

There Are 16 Circles In This Image, And Most People Can’t Find Them Right Away

Check out the pattern below. What do you see? A bunch of lines and boxes, right? Well believe it or not, there’s actually sixteen circles hiding in there somewhere. We know, it sounds crazy, but you’ll just have to trust us on this one.


Show Full Text

It’s called the Coffer Illusion, and it was a finalist in the 2006 Best Illusion of the Year contest. It was created by Anthony Norcia, formerly of the Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, and it’s called the Coffer Illusion because Coffer is an architectural term used to refer to a series of sunken panels in various shapes.

The picture was recently uploaded by somebody called i124nk8, and it’s been astounding and bamboozling the internet ever since. Some people can see the circles, some people can’t. Can you? Then let us know in the comments below!

Optical illusions work by using color, light and patterns to create images that are designed to confuse the brain. They occur because our mind is trying to interpret what our eyes see, thereby creating a perception that doesn’t match the real image in front of us.