Safaris and oceans are places for nature lovers and keen observers – but never for the faintest of hearts. Contrary to how it is depicted in textbooks, the serene – sometimes violent – beauty of the wild & marine life is far more intense in person than in print, making you miss a lot on the authentic feel of seeing them on the move. To give you a heads up on the true form of the fauna, here are 18 fearless photos of nature in action brought to us by photographers who brave the danger-dominated grounds just to capture wildlife in its full, captivating rawness.

1. Half dry, half wet, full glorious

“We want to highlight the disappearing world, capture and produce projects that not only put the beauty of nature on display, but also explores the stories of what can be done to protect, and preserve it. ” – Chris Fischer, 360 Wildlife Filmmaker

Image credits: travelama.amafeed.com

2. The pincher that should not be named

“While pursuing my studies, I became inspired by the many local conservation workers, and took a strong interest in marine conservation issues.” -Mei Lin Neo, Marine Biologist at St. John’s Island National Marine Laboratory

Image credits: oceanama.amafeed.com

3. This impromptu color palette

“I’m a passionate wildlife fanatic who has travelled all over Africa for many years over both land and sea. I have seen many incredible animals and beautiful sights underwater, on land and in the sky, and I’d love to tell you all about them.” – Courtney Griffiths, Scuba Diver & Amateur Photographer

Image credits: safariama.amafeed.com

4. Sunset, embodied

“I am a South African with a passion for wildlife photography. Anything from dangerous animals to insects can make a fantastic photo.” – Frank Solomon, Former Safari Guide, Wildlife Photographer & Nature Enthusiast

Image credits: safariama.amafeed.com

4. Is it a purple underwater porcupine? A purple scorpion? We’ll never know

“I am an avid science communicator, who strives to share with everyone the wonders of oceans and why we should care about the oceans. I keep a personal website that I write about my research journey.” -Mei Lin Neo, Marine Biologist at St. John’s Island National Marine Laboratory

Image credits: oceanama.amafeed.com

5. The lone ranger

“I worked as a safari guide for a number of years in South Africa and still do regular wild camping safaris in Africa with my wife. Passionate about wildlife and photography, I have stories that will make the hair on the back of your neck stand up throughout this incredible journey.” – Frank Solomon, Former Safari Guide, Wildlife Photographer & Nature Enthusiast

Image credits: safariama.amafeed.com

6. Look at that dessert-looking underwater

“When not doing scientific research, I volunteer with local blue groups such as TeamSeaGrass and Reef Friends to promote marine conservation and educate fellow volunteers. I am also an avid diver that loves underwater photography!” -Mei Lin Neo, Marine Biologist at St. John’s Island National Marine Laboratory

Image credits: oceanama.amafeed.com

7. And this camera-shy waterbucks

“My photography has always been more of a hobby, I would like to sell some of my work but as long as I have the opportunity to take photos and be in nature I will be happy.” – Frank Solomon, Former Safari Guide, Wildlife Photographer & Nature Enthusiast

Image credits: safariama.amafeed.com

8. Oh, some real RAWNESS

“I have been in a few dangerous situations; this will always be the case when working with wild animals. The most important part knows how to get you out of them.”- Frank Solomon, Former Safari Guide, Wildlife Photographer & Nature Enthusiast

Image credits: safariama.amafeed.com

9. This glam clam, mother-nature style

“Through my research projects, I found my favorite marine animal, the Giant Clams. My passion to help the giant clams led to two restocking programmes in Singapore, with the aim to breed and grow young clams for putting back onto our reefs.” – Mei Lin Neo, Marine Biologist at St. John’s Island National Marine Laboratory

Image credits: oceanama.amafeed.com

10. This satisfying single file of real-life Dumbos

“The photo shows an adult Bull elephant and a cow and calf. Notice the size difference and the shape of the head. Females have a more ‘square’ shape head and males a more rounded head.” – Frank Solomon, Former Safari Guide, Wildlife Photographer & Nature Enthusiast

Image credits: safariama.amafeed.com

11. A stampede, but with zebras instead of concert crowd

“Our ultimate goal is to share the beauty and majesty of the natural world with everyone, everywhere. Through the power of immersive media, this is now possible, and we are able to transport viewers to the furthest reaches of the globe, without ever leaving their homes. ” – Chris Fischer, 360 Wildlife Filmmaker

Image credits: travelama.amafeed.com

12. Those mesmerizing all-natural prints

“I feel that my work has led to the awareness of what is going on in the environment. I’d admit that what I have been doing only addresses a small part of the problems, and only for the marine environment.”- Mei Lin Neo, Marine Biologist at St. John’s Island National Marine Laboratory

Image credits: oceanama.amafeed.com

13. The battle of the horns

“I have taken a few photos of animals fighting. This the most recent taken December 2016 in Marakele National Park, South Africa.” –
– Frank Solomon, Former Safari Guide, Wildlife Photographer & Nature Enthusiast

Image credits: safariama.amafeed.com

14. Since when did shaking dust off looked this spectacular?

“The most important thing to look for is that ‘something else’ That one thing that makes the subject more than a subject, what makes them, them. Look for a glimpse that takes you beyond a simple pose. It’s about that one thing that transports them from just another elephant something much more. ” – Chris Fischer, 360 Wildlife Filmmaker

Image credits: travelama.amafeed.com

15. Not your “good boys”

“This is one of my favourite photos, the photo is focused on the main subject yet it still gives the impression of the movement of the African Wild dogs.” – Frank Solomon, Former Safari Guide, Wildlife Photographer & Nature Enthusiast

Image credits: safariama.amafeed.com

16. The eyes that stare right back into your soul

“My job can get quite adventurous for me! I’ve encountered bad weather in waist-deep waters and my boat couldn’t pick me up, had a sea snake wrapped around my ankle while diving unknowingly, got tail-whipped by a massive whale shark because I got in its way, and several of such stories!” – Mei Lin Neo, Marine Biologist at St. John’s Island National Marine Laboratory

Image credits: oceanama.amafeed.com

17. And a piercing gaze that cuts through the bushes

“For me, it’s not about a career in photography or film, it’s about finding a way to use my talents to spark change, real, tangible change in the world. If I can get one more person to care about an elephant, lion or rhino, I have what I set out to do… and that makes it all worth it.” – Chris Fischer, 360 Wildlife Filmmaker

Image credits: travelama.amafeed.com

18. Enough with the fierce eyes — here’s a friendly elephant shooting you friendly stares

“I have been charged by raging wild elephants (among other animals) in South Africa and Botswana more times than I can count and, without exaggeration, on a few occasions I have been lucky to escape with my life.” – Courtney Griffiths, Scuba Diver & Amateur Photographer

Image credits: safariama.amafeed.com