We know every country has their own idioms, which often make no sense to anyone other than those who have grown up with them, but for those in the know, they make perfect sense!

We are bringing you Russia’s TOP TEN idioms, with a helping hand from renowned artist Nathan James. By the time you’ve familiarised yourself with these, we’re hoping you won’t get overexcited… but you’ll jump out of your pants!

#1

Russians Don’t Exaggerate, They 'Make An Elephant Out Of A Fly'

Russians Don’t Exaggerate, They 'Make An Elephant Out Of A Fly'

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Mine Benker
Community Member
5 years ago

In Turkey, we make a camel out of a flea..

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#2

A Russian Won’t Lie To You, He’ll 'Hang Noodles On Your Ears'

A Russian Won’t Lie To You, He’ll 'Hang Noodles On Your Ears'

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Rita
Community Member
5 years ago

it's correct, but in Russia we don't eat noodle from Chinese small box :)

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#3

You Are Not Just Talented Or Skilled, You Can 'Shoe A Flea'

You Are Not Just Talented Or Skilled, You Can 'Shoe A Flea'

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John Tenletters
Community Member
5 years ago

Nono, not a shoe like the one at the picture. A horseshoe.

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#4

It’ll Never Happen – ‘A Lobster Whistles On Top Of A Mountain’

It’ll Never Happen – ‘A Lobster Whistles On Top Of A Mountain’

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Igor Nikeshin
Community Member
5 years ago

crayfish is correct !)

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#5

A Russian Person Doesn’t Swear Something Is True… He Will ‘Give You His Tooth For It’

A Russian Person Doesn’t Swear Something Is True… He Will ‘Give You His Tooth For It’

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Igor Nikeshin
Community Member
5 years ago

This ia just awful jail slang! ) This slang usually use bad educated and dumb people only ! Sometimes use as a joke about dumb people )

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#6

Russians Don’t Show Off… They ‘Throw Dust In Your Eyes’

Russians Don’t Show Off… They ‘Throw Dust In Your Eyes’

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Ana Vrbanov
Community Member
5 years ago

Some of these sayings are used in other countries of Europe too, here in Croatia as well, so it's not just the "Russian" thing. :)

Brian McCall
Community Member
5 years ago

You're all Russians to me. Where I am now, there are Georgians, Serbs, Croats, and an assortment of other Slavic countries. They all have the same way of talking, like every. word. is. forced. down. like. making. a. dog. sit.

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Lana Soboleva
Community Member
5 years ago

This is completely inaccurate. It's not showing off when you actually have a skill, it's attempting to create an impression that you are more than you actually are. Like if the guy rents a ferrari by the hour to show up for a date :D He is "throwing dust in the girl's eyes".

Ahmad AlKhalaf
Community Member
5 years ago

In Syria they go, "how about I make your mind fly away!" Sort of a "blow ur mind" thing

Maysa Niyazova
Community Member
5 years ago

Ugh. That doesn't mean "to show off". That means to present information as more than it actually is. To exaggerate or straight out lie is more correct.

Olivia W
Community Member
5 years ago

knock your socks off / blow your mind (UK)

BoriSlava Stavreva
Community Member
5 years ago

Dust in the eyes' is not showing off but to trick you, to make you a fool

Dima Less
Community Member
5 years ago

Hmm... Not entirely correct. Throwing dust in the eyes, means distract someone from the truth. Pretty much like a car salesman "throwing dust in your eyes" by making up completely bogus facts about the car. Showing off is different.

Kalin Petrov
Community Member
5 years ago

In Bulgaria we have the same : "прах в очите"

Alberto
Community Member
5 years ago

There is the same expression in Italy and in France :)

Alberto
Community Member
5 years ago

Oh, but it is not dust, it is powder ;) "Buttare polvere negli occhi" and "Jeter de la poudre aux yeux"

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Alper
Community Member
5 years ago

in Turkish they (paint your eyes)

Alexandr Lyovin
Community Member
5 years ago

In French it's "jeter de la poudre aux yeux"

Nadya Nazarieva
Community Member
5 years ago

https://fr.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poudre_aux_yeux same thing in french

Nadya Nazarieva
Community Member
5 years ago

https://fr.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poudre_aux_yeux also french

PigMaster
Community Member
5 years ago

In Soviet Russia, dust throw in eyes you!

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#7

A Russian Doesn’t Say He’s In A Crowded Place, He Says He’s 'Like Herring In The Barrel'

A Russian Doesn’t Say He’s In A Crowded Place, He Says He’s 'Like Herring In The Barrel'

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Vela Lightle
Community Member
5 years ago

Packed like Sardines. Same thing really.

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#8

A Russian Doesn’t Get Overexcited, He 'Jumps Out Of His Pants'

A Russian Doesn’t Get Overexcited, He 'Jumps Out Of His Pants'

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Intensive Panda
Community Member
5 years ago

Pants, not undies

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#9

Russians Don’t Have A Snack, They 'Kill The Worm'

Russians Don’t Have A Snack, They 'Kill The Worm'

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Igor Nikeshin
Community Member
5 years ago

Slang too. More exactly that sounds something like this ."To excruciate a little worm to death"

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#10

Russians Don’t Say You Have An Interesting Aspect To Your Character, They Say You Have A 'Raisin'

Russians Don’t Say You Have An Interesting Aspect To Your Character, They Say You Have A 'Raisin'

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Arina I
Community Member
5 years ago

The word used for raisin in this idiom is actually in the diminutive somewhat cutesy form. So if you have something interesting about you, that interesting thing about you is referred to as a baby raisin by this idiom. It is an odd expression, sure, but it is somewhat akin to "the cherry on top" expression in English, which to non-English speakers might seem like a similarly random food item metaphorically used to signify something extraordinary.

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