For her project titled Salt Bride, Israeli artist Sigalit Landau decided to submerge a black gown in the Dead Sea. The gown spent 2 months in the salt-rich waters in 2014, and as you can see from these stunning pictures, the end result is nothing short of magical.


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The project is an eight-part photo series inspired by S. Ansky’s 1916 play titled Dybbuk. The play is about a young Hasidic woman who becomes possessed by the spirit of her dead lover, and Landau’s salt-encrusted gown is a replica of the one worn in the dramatic production of the 1920s.

Landau checked on the black gown various times in order to capture the gradual process of salt crystalisation that you can see in the pictures below. You can also see them at London’s Marlborough Contemporary, where they’ll be on display until September 3rd.

UPDATE: An earlier version of this article said that the gown had been submerged for two years, not two months. Sorry for the mistake.

More info: Sigalit Landau | Marlborough Contemporary (h/t: mymodernmet)

Image credits: Sigalit Landau/Marlborough Contemporary

Image credits: Sigalit Landau/Marlborough Contemporary

Image credits: Sigalit Landau/Marlborough Contemporary

Image credits: Sigalit Landau/Marlborough Contemporary

Image credits: Shaxaf Haber

Image credits: Matanya Tausig

Image credits: Matanya Tausig

Image credits: Sigalit Landau/Marlborough Contemporary