Christoph Niemann is an artist who’s bursting at the seams with creativity. When he’s not drawing clever and insightful cartoons for the New York Times and other prestigious publications, he creates clever illustrations for fun, using everyday objects to enrich and complete his daily creations.

Show Full Text

Niemann calls the drawings his “Sunday Sketches” and fits them in between his more serious illustrations, which include both political cartoons and column illustrations for the Times Magazine and the New Yorker.

We’re big fans of using everyday objects to create drawings because it’s such a fun and inclusive art form! Javier Perez and Gilbert Legrand are just two of the many artists we’ve covered who love this artform!

If you like Niemann’s work, check out his books on Amazon as well! Read on to see his answers to Bored Panda’s questions about his work.

More info: | Facebook | AmazonTumblr | Twitter | Instagram (h/t: demilkedtwistedsifter)

I try to let the object dictate where I’m going,” Cristoph Niemann told Bored Panda. “I pick a random object, put it on my desk and then just start staring at it, desperately hoping that somethings clicks

I try to tackle these images with absolutely no plan regarding the end result. I’m searching for an unusual angle that leads to a visual connection that is surprising for me (and the viewer)

This series started as a very personal side project — I had discovered Instagram and thought it was a nice platform for the visual experiments I often do on the weekends

For most of my regular work (whether it’s a single image, an animation or a story) I come up with a specific idea first, and then try to find the best possible way to get my point across to the reader. This requires a lot of training and routine (drawing, writing and endless rounds of editing)

The more I started working on the Sunday Sketches, I realized it’s a great way to practice the most important skill of a visual artist: being able to look at something long and hard

I wish I could say they are fun to do, but it’s actually a tormenting process: every time I feel like ‘that’s it, it’s too hard — I can’t do it’

Getting nice feedback from readers makes up for the agony though

My idea of art is to have a conversation at eye level with the audience

I always rely on the visual wit of my readers. I’m not interested in sitting on a stage and showing off my artistic skills. The readers have to do the smart thinking — all I’m doing is giving them cues on how put together what they already know in a new and (hopefully) interesting way

Christopher Niemann has released numerous books with his work, which can be found on Amazon